Need Help with My Rescue Horse
   

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Need Help with My Rescue Horse

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  • Where do you get your rescue from horse forum
  • A horse's food obsession

 
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    11-11-2011, 07:20 PM
  #1
Foal
Need Help with My Rescue Horse

My rescue, Copper, that I adopted about a little more than a month ago has a HUGE problem with leaving food since had to go the first 3 years of his life without it.

I just wanted to ask, if anyone had any ideas on how to teach him that he doesn't always have to stop when he sees hay on the ground.

I think he might grow out of it but he is only 4 and has went his entire life without knowing that food will always be there.

I also, want to teach him to lounge(sorry for my spelling) in the round pen.
Is it better to start on or off the lead line?

Also, I can get him to go to the left but not the right when I try he just follows me. He goes to the left at a walk only. I have gotten him up to a trot once, but he doesn't know verbal ques. How do I teach him verbal ques for walk, trot, and canter? He knows whoa.

Okay, last question. How do you teach a horse to trot beside you? I want to show Copper in hand but I can't get him to trot next to me. I looks at me like he knows what I want, but won't go more than a fast walk.

Thank- You!
     
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    11-11-2011, 09:20 PM
  #2
Foal
You might want to invest in some of the range of dvd's out there for the basics you need. Clinton gives you the most bang for the buck and he's a hoot to boot.
As to the feeding, it will take a while I've had many rescues and they are so food focused and bolt their food thinking it won't be there. Sometimes it will take 2 years, but if they have hay most of the day, they will get over it.
     
    11-11-2011, 09:40 PM
  #3
Foal
Thanks! I will look into that. Also, I figured it would take him some time; I tried to avoid all hay whenever I have him out.
     
    11-11-2011, 09:48 PM
  #4
Banned
I would question whether his food obsession actually stems from being starved, or if he's just a piggy food hound who has your number. You'd swear some of mine are currently starving, the way they'll try to dive for grass on a trail ride, but it's just a bad habit that has to be broken. Demand his attention and his respect, period.

Longeing--personal preference. I always used to start with the horse free in a small round pen, but nowadays I'd just as soon start in the open on a longe line. Use the whip to direct him. Don't be afraid to pop him with it, but of course not beat him, if necessary to get him moving out.

Once you establish some of the above, and have him well halter broke and responsive to pressure, the trotting in hand thing should come naturally.
     
    11-11-2011, 10:00 PM
  #5
Foal
Yes, Thank-You.

I do not give in what so ever to his food obsession and only let him eat or give him treats after I have worked him in the round pen. He can be ridden also, but I want to improve his ground manners and gain some more respect from him. Since I have gotten him, he has begun to challenge me so I have increased our round-pen time.

I will try to start him on the lounge line then, I think our relationship might improve better that way since well be kind of connected.

Thanks again!
     
    11-11-2011, 10:23 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by bubba13    
I would question whether his food obsession actually stems from being starved, or if he's just a piggy food hound who has your number. You'd swear some of mine are currently starving, the way they'll try to dive for grass on a trail ride, but it's just a bad habit that has to be broken. Demand his attention and his respect, period.

Longeing--personal preference. I always used to start with the horse free in a small round pen, but nowadays I'd just as soon start in the open on a longe line. Use the whip to direct him. Don't be afraid to pop him with it, but of course not beat him, if necessary to get him moving out.

Once you establish some of the above, and have him well halter broke and responsive to pressure, the trotting in hand thing should come naturally.
Took the words right out of my mouth. :P

My rescue pony was the same for food, he'd get a flake a day if he was lucky before I got him. He'd get stressed and upset if you went near him when he was trying to eat (Used to get beat with things when he was fed) and when food arrived he'd take every opportunity to just mow down as much as possible. Over time he got over it. He loves being rubbed when he eats now though if he doesn't know the person he might pin his ears at most. He also isn't as crazy frantic about every little thing of food, but does get quite excited for supper. XD It'll take some time for him to settle in and realize the foods not going anywhere. He could just be a bit of a piggy pony like said, but over all, I wouldn't overly worry about it and just give him time. :)

As per lunging in the round pen I always start horses without the line first. If you have a lunge whip you can send him with that, or even if you have rope you can also use that to. I'll see if I can't get my friend to take a video tomorrow of me lunging Shnook to help give you some extra tips on starting a horse to lunge. When you send your horse on its "bad way", make sure you're not getting in front of the horse if you want it to go forward. A trick I was taught was when sending the horse out, have your belly button face a little behind the girth area. When your horse is out and at the pace you want you want your belly button to face the girth area. When you want your horse to slow or stop face it more near their shoulders. When starting a horse into lunging, it's important not to get ahead of them. Otherwise they may (and most the time) take it as you blocking them from that direction. If the horse is following you then you're definitely far too ahead of your horse. Don't get behind your horse enough to be in kicking range, but you do need to make sure you're a little behind the girth area to send him out.

As for teaching your horse vocal commands, ask with your body language and pressure/whatnot but also start saying what you want the horse to do when you ask it with the rest of you. Keep doing it and with enough time and work your horse should know what you expect by vocal commands.

Hope this helped! :)
     
    11-11-2011, 10:41 PM
  #7
Foal
Copper is not aggressive at all with his food. The only time he seems obsessed is when he is out of his paddock. I usually stand next to him while he eats his dinner and brush him or braid his mane. Sometimes I even sit on his back. The only time he acts up around food is when. I am taking back to his paddock or to the round pen. But, I am sure he will get over it with time. I knew it would only take time and so I am not too worried. He is such a respectable horse.

Thank-You!
I think the video will help alot!
     

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