New 3yrold.. wanting some tips.
 
 

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New 3yrold.. wanting some tips.

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        01-27-2013, 08:43 PM
      #1
    Foal
    New 3yrold.. wanting some tips.

    I was wondering if you guys had any tips for me to use on her.. she is broke to ride.. but hasnt been road in a while.. lookn for ways to make her un spooky.. ride better, and to trust me..
         
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        01-27-2013, 10:07 PM
      #2
    Super Moderator
    Wet saddle blankets! Lots of 'em.

    Ride on long rides with a purpose. Ask for a lot, do a lot and look waaaay ahead of where you are and then ride there with a purpose. When a horse is fresh and spooky and green, I like to ride them all day. Not real hard but a lot of miles, go a lot of different places and do a lot of different things. You can get one really broke.
         
        01-27-2013, 10:18 PM
      #3
    Green Broke
    I agree and disagree with the above post. Only when the rider feels comfortable that the young green horse is mentally able to handle long rides an doing a lot of everything.

    When ever I have gotten a new young horse Who is still green I keep it short and simple until I feel I can ask more demanding tasks physically and mentally.

    Young horses can get frapped easily when given a lot to do in large chunks of time.
    Build up the confidence together over simply easy to do things then start adding one or two new tasks in but always end on a postive note with something you both are doing good at.

    Starting and ending with ground work is a smart idea. You can ride and ask new things in the saddle while keeping things fun and postive. Then go back to something your working with on the ground that will transfer to you riding later....

    Starting with something your both fimliar with then going somewhere new is always a good exercise.

    Hope that helps give you some ideas.
    Good luck and have fun!!
         
        01-27-2013, 10:36 PM
      #4
    Super Moderator
    The difference is that we ride out. We might cover 10 or 12 miles of varied terrain. I do not think anything goes as far as getting a horse tired. I have never had one get frazzled unless a person was trying to drill and drill and drill one in an arena or something like that. If we ride in the arena, it is for 10 minutes after we get back home so I can end on a good note, dismount and loosen the girth in the arena and lead the horse out. That is how we end most every ride.

    This particular horse is broke but spooky. The long tiring rides will get rid of the anxiety much more quickly than short rides where the horse never actually gets over being spooky on that particular day. You can ride one like this day after day after day for a short period of time and still have the same spooky, booger hunting horse. At least this has been my experience.
         
        01-27-2013, 11:02 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Do ground work with your horse, do some desensitizing which will help with spookiness and will also help the horse learn to trust you and look at you as the leader......
    Klassic Superstar likes this.
         
        01-27-2013, 11:05 PM
      #6
    Yearling
    I totally agree with Cherie. Get the horse out. I don't care what people say, exposure and miles is the only way to truly get the horse to ride better. Long days in the saddle will get a horse broke, get them exposed to things so they aren't so spooky and build a relationship. If you are not comfortable riding a young horse out on long rides, find somebody who will..
    JaphyJaphy likes this.
         
        01-28-2013, 07:07 AM
      #7
    Foal
    Thank you guys that helped alot!! :)
         
        01-28-2013, 07:43 AM
      #8
    Super Moderator
    Back when I trained for the public and bought, trained and sold a lot of OTTBs and OTTQHs I did the exact same thing. I spent a few days getting more control and guiding working on them and then I headed to the hills. I trained a lot of Arabs for the public for trail riding (mostly competitive), for flat racing and for showing. I did the exact same thing with them. For me to get the most done with them, I wanted them really 'broke' first. That meant going to the mountains. I lived across one irrigation canal from BLM, National Forest and not very far from 2 Wilderness areas that extended well above timber line. I could ride over 3 million acres without hitting a fence. I had the brokest, least spooky hot-bloods in the country. I was coming back to the ranch and starting TBs over fences in brief rides after returning from the trails. [Oh, and did I mention that many of them were stallions, particularly Arabs. It was years before anyone sent me an Arabian gelding. I did not think these people owned knives or knew Vets castrated horses back then]

    These horses rode like they had had a year or more of training after 60 days or less. I was selling hunter, jumping and dressage prospects and people would not believe me how recently they had raced. They were quiet, willing and very controllable. They would all ride on a long, loose rein. Very few were spooky at all. People that do not think this works just have not done it and have babied horses along for months or years. A few wet saddle blankets and long rides out in the rough country would have had them riding like a totally different horse. They come back to the ranch on a long, loose rein, walking out with a low flat neck and are sure not hunting boogers. You just cannot get this done in an arena.

    Oh! And by the way, I did little or no ground work other than training them to move when a where I wanted (most track horses already did this) and teaching them to longe. Well, many of the Arabians had been pets so they took a little more mannering. Come to think of it, the term 'ground work' had not been coined back then. I just called it 'mannering' them and breaking them to longe. It took all of a day or two.
         
        01-28-2013, 08:05 AM
      #9
    Showing
    Totally agree with Cherie about the wet saddle blankets. Getting a horse tired takes the stupid out of them.
         
        01-28-2013, 05:22 PM
      #10
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cherie    
    Back when I trained for the public and bought, trained and sold a lot of OTTBs and OTTQHs I did the exact same thing. I spent a few days getting more control and guiding working on them and then I headed to the hills. I trained a lot of Arabs for the public for trail riding (mostly competitive), for flat racing and for showing. I did the exact same thing with them. For me to get the most done with them, I wanted them really 'broke' first. That meant going to the mountains. I lived across one irrigation canal from BLM, National Forest and not very far from 2 Wilderness areas that extended well above timber line. I could ride over 3 million acres without hitting a fence. I had the brokest, least spooky hot-bloods in the country. I was coming back to the ranch and starting TBs over fences in brief rides after returning from the trails. [Oh, and did I mention that many of them were stallions, particularly Arabs. It was years before anyone sent me an Arabian gelding. I did not think these people owned knives or knew Vets castrated horses back then]

    These horses rode like they had had a year or more of training after 60 days or less. I was selling hunter, jumping and dressage prospects and people would not believe me how recently they had raced. They were quiet, willing and very controllable. They would all ride on a long, loose rein. Very few were spooky at all. People that do not think this works just have not done it and have babied horses along for months or years. A few wet saddle blankets and long rides out in the rough country would have had them riding like a totally different horse. They come back to the ranch on a long, loose rein, walking out with a low flat neck and are sure not hunting boogers. You just cannot get this done in an arena.

    Oh! And by the way, I did little or no ground work other than training them to move when a where I wanted (most track horses already did this) and teaching them to longe. Well, many of the Arabians had been pets so they took a little more mannering. Come to think of it, the term 'ground work' had not been coined back then. I just called it 'mannering' them and breaking them to longe. It took all of a day or two.
    I agree, I was wondering how you teach a horse to lunge on a line, the mare lunges in a round pen but we don't have one..
         

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