New Attitude Problem
 
 

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New Attitude Problem

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  • Horse attitude problem
  • My horse has an attitude problem he bucks

 
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    01-06-2011, 02:41 AM
  #1
Foal
New Attitude Problem

So this past month and a half, the weathers been awful. My horse hasn't been able to be worked every day because of that. Well, the weathers been getting better since about two weeks ago. So, my trainer and I started working him again under saddle. He was doing fine. Then, one day, he developed an attitude problem. He doesn't want to walk forward and will throw a buck. At that point, I had my trainer ride him instead of me and see what was going on with him. She's been riding him every day for the past week and a half. His attitude has seemed to be getting better, however, he is still bucking. No longer at the walk, but he'll throw a couple of bucks at the trot, and at the canter. He is not in pain. The saddle fits him fine. I have no idea how to get through to him. On the ground, he is perfect. Its just undersaddle, he's changed. I know I need to just show him i'm boss and work him through it, but I don't have the confidence to ride out the bucks and get through to him. Any advice? By the way, he is a five, almost six year old horse. Before when he was worked consistently, he was amazingly perfect. But now, he has an attitude about moving forward and working. I haven't ridden him in around two weeks, instead having my trainer ride him and me working on groundwork/lunging with side reins with him. I am really stuck and don't know what to do. Thank you!
     
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    01-06-2011, 03:06 AM
  #2
Foal
You know, I had a situation that sounds very similar to yours. I had a horse, that totally was fine, then had some inconsistent work, and a lot of sitting around. I go to get on him one day, and he figured out that if he bucks, I got a little frightened and backed down. I'm not a very assertive person by nature. The problem escalated and he got it into that little equine brain of his that bucking=no work! But after I worked him through the issue: Meaning I rode him through the bucks pushing him forward and making him work. We haven't had that bucking problem since. You know, your horse may just work himself out of the problem ion his own, I've found that when they've been on a break for awhile, most are just lazy and don't wanna work. But once they get back into the swing of things, they generally get much happier and settle down to do their jobs. In any case, I hope you and your horse work your problem out. Main thing is don't get frustrated, you guys will get through it! :)
     
    01-06-2011, 09:09 AM
  #3
Foal
Has your trainer suggested that you carry a crop or dressage whip? Your horse won't physically be able to buck if he has sufficient forward motion. Perhaps your trainer can see what his response is to the crop so you don't end up more fearful than you are now. More than anything, he should obey your command to go forward so you can use the crop to reinforce your aids and get him to to tune in and listen.
I have been having this problem. My perch/tb, 4 years old, hasn't had time off but has been more stubborn as of late. I carried a crop for one ride and have seen improvement. I ask in my consistent fashion for my horse to trot, making it very clear what I am asking for. I give him two chances to listen and then I holler at him to get his attention. If he still doesn't wake up to voice, I use the crop.
Since using the crop for even one ride, my horse associates my consistent cues with the fact that I mean business. I think it was important for me to use the crop in conjunction with my normal cues so that it would serve as a reinforcement, and not just a random swat. Since your horse is also somewhat young, he could also just be a bit intolerant of inconsistent cues. Your trainer may have better luck with him because she is more direct and is therefore communicating more clearly. Make sure you are matching your cues to your trainers' so your horse also has consistency between riders.
     
    01-06-2011, 09:48 AM
  #4
Showing
At 5 or 6 your horse is in his "teenage" years and they are typically defiant at that age. This is a turning point in his training and you need to gain control now before it becomes habit. This is what you have a trainer for and if she isn't doing the job, then you need to either find a trainer who can or you need to replace your horse with an older "been there, done that" horse.

Your fear and/or lack of confidence in your ability to handle him will only escalate unless you gain control. I've been passionate about horses my entire life and I've owned them for ~30 years but I have no problem in replacing a horse that isn't working for me - same for trainers.
     
    01-06-2011, 12:41 PM
  #5
Foal
This situation sounds VERY similar to my 3 YO TB. He had the "im not walking forward issue" and then would buck. He would only want to walk and not go into the trot. He thought of it more as a game. I would get on, and kick, and kick, and kick, progressively getting harder each time. He would just stand there. When I would use the crop after that he would move foward. There were even sometimes when he would not move forward at the hit of the crop.

When that happened, and some might cringe at this, but it worked for me....I would get off, crop in hand and hit him on the rear all while talking to him in a stern voice and say "move forward" making him go in a circle until he got the idea. I would then re-mount and ask him to move forward again.

After that if he wouldnt move forward I would have the crop, and smack him with it to let him know that I had it, and then walk him once around the ring with it and then throw it (i don't like to ride with a crop) off to the other side of the fence and keep riding. He didnt know that I didnt have it.

Through all that we have little "hiccups" here and there but he has never had the problem like he did before.

Believe me, I don't get confident with buck either, my TB had a major issue with bucks, I mean major, so I am always a little nervous that he will again throw a huge buck, but he is just testing you, hang in there, it will get better. Show him that he has to do what you ask.
     
    01-06-2011, 01:36 PM
  #6
Foal
RansomeTB, that is exactly what we've been doing. When he refuses to move foward, and we have given him the chance to respond to our leg, we (my trainer or me) hop off, take the dressage whip and give him a smack on his rump and tell him to move foward. That seems to work, as he does associate bucking/not moving foward with a smack on the rump. The bucking now is not nearly as bad as it was a week and a half ago, however it is still there in the back of his mind. I know I just need to stick it through and show him i'm confident and in charge. I don't want to give up on him as I know he has the potential and talent to be an amazing horse. I just hope this is a short phase he is going through and that we will be able to work through it.
     
    01-06-2011, 04:26 PM
  #7
Started
My horse had the same problem, only he bucked when we cantered or full out ran. His bucks were huge too, so there was no way I was staying on! If I so much as felt back round up or saw his head lower I would stop him, hop off, and make him work from the ground such as everybody else has said they've done. This showed him that even if I'm not on his back he's still going to have to work. He got the picture fairly quick!
     
    01-06-2011, 10:49 PM
  #8
Trained
We should just all pile onto the same cold weather = bratty horse thread. For some reason, winter just makes horses more opinionated. Patience works best. If you can ride it out, do it. Otherwise just wish for spring!
     
    01-07-2011, 09:31 AM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovepavani    
RansomeTB, that is exactly what we've been doing. When he refuses to move foward, and we have given him the chance to respond to our leg, we (my trainer or me) hop off, take the dressage whip and give him a smack on his rump and tell him to move foward. That seems to work, as he does associate bucking/not moving foward with a smack on the rump. The bucking now is not nearly as bad as it was a week and a half ago, however it is still there in the back of his mind. I know I just need to stick it through and show him i'm confident and in charge. I don't want to give up on him as I know he has the potential and talent to be an amazing horse. I just hope this is a short phase he is going through and that we will be able to work through it.

Just hang in there! It will get better, Ransom is to the point now where I don't even need the crop, he is moves off my leg beautifully, but I see when I don't ride him for a few days, about a week or more if the weather is bad, he will try again.

There was about a week or two stretch that he would not move forward at the beginning of winter. That's when I had to get off of him and smack him to get him to move forward, it was funny because as soon as I would dismount crop in hand you could see it in his face "oh @!*%$ mom got off, maybe I should have just moved forward that would have been easier"

Glad to hear that I am not the only one who uses that method, after you assert your dominance and the respect is there they become a lot easier.
     
    01-07-2011, 11:30 AM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by RansomTB    
Just hang in there! It will get better, Ransom is to the point now where I don't even need the crop, he is moves off my leg beautifully, but I see when I don't ride him for a few days, about a week or more if the weather is bad, he will try again.

There was about a week or two stretch that he would not move forward at the beginning of winter. That's when I had to get off of him and smack him to get him to move forward, it was funny because as soon as I would dismount crop in hand you could see it in his face "oh @!*%$ mom got off, maybe I should have just moved forward that would have been easier"

Glad to hear that I am not the only one who uses that method, after you assert your dominance and the respect is there they become a lot easier.
haha, that sounds like Sunny. Once we even take our feet out of the stirrups, he has that look and we can tell he's thinking about what he just did and that he should've walked forward. It's getting a ton better with him now. Yesterday, he threw one buck when asked to trot, but it wasn't a full-hearted buck like the previous times. I'm glad were getting through to him. Thanks so much for the encouragement :) Glad to know i'm doing something right.
     

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