New Colt!! Help?? xx
   

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New Colt!! Help?? xx

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  • When will may pony stop being coltish after being gelded
  • How long does it take for a gelded pony to lose coltish behaviour

 
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    05-23-2011, 04:22 PM
  #1
Foal
New Colt!! Help?? xx

Just after any advice, suggestions, personal experience, opinions...

So yesterday I bought Romeo... a stunning liver chestnut welsh section D colt (just turned one)... He is almost untouched and until yesterday never been led round or tied up and hadnt left the field in which he was born.. HOWEVER he loaded in less than 5 minutes and travelled perfectly and remained calm as I stabled him the first night. Such a good boy!!

This morning I went to the stables and he was lovely... let me groom him all over and took him for a walk he was perfect UNTILL he saw the other horses... he didnt do anything nasty or naughty he just got a bit wound up (but I expected that)... He then started acting very 'coltish' grunting rearing, stamping..

I decided to turn him into the field and for the 5 minute walk down he kept biting me my arms are bruised all over! He settled into the field within 10minutes (on his own) and I went to see him in the evening he came trotting over when I called him but just kept biting me!!!

I don't expect our journey to be 'easy' and im not naive to think I wont encounter any problems... I have owned my mare for 6 years... and had horses from foal-to-filly-mare but I have never had any experience with Colts! Does anybody have any comments or advise or stories they would like to share with me :)

When will he stop being 'coltish'... is it common for colts to keep biting??... will he grow out of it?? Shall I punish him for misbehaving? Or ignore it? Thanks for reading (and replying)
THE CHOP IS BOOKED FOR THURSDAY!!
     
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    05-23-2011, 04:35 PM
  #2
Weanling
If you ignore it, he won't stop. YOU are the herd leader. In the wild, the herd leader would never tolerate a young colt biting him. The herd leader would obviously punish the colt by biting him back. I'm not saying to bite your horse, but to give him a whack and say "NO!" when he tries/does bite you. This is what I did with my 11 month old colt.
     
    05-23-2011, 04:47 PM
  #3
Yearling
Is he gelded? Stud colts are often very mouthy and 'selfish', so to speak.

IF HE BITES: PROMPTLY. The SECOND he does it, SMACK HIM. Hard. On the nose. Don't just flick him and go "Oh stop!" give him a good whack and go "NO."

He will be very surprised and offended at this. I punish for the behavior, let it sink in a second, then rub them on the forehead or between the ears. Act as if nothing ever happened.

Your not going to injure your colt doing this :)
Consider it this way, if he where to bite him mother, or even an older gelding, they would likely turn around and chomp right back at him, or even send a hoof in his direction. One liable to connect.

I had the same problem with a stud colt, it got better after he was gelded. It took maybe, two times? For him to understand that no, I am not edible, and yes, I am bigger and stronger then you.
Even after gelding he attempted a little nibble, but a loud "NO" stopped him right in his tracks without me so much as touching him.

Youngsters are quite difficult to deal with, they have attention spans the size of a flea :roll:
     
    05-23-2011, 04:59 PM
  #4
Yearling
We do the "AH AH!" sound, even my kids do it which is pretty funny. If the sound doesn't work a sound slap should and get him to back out of your space.

Like twogeldings said NO other older horse would tolerate that behavior, neither should you. You have to think from a leaders perspective so he doesn't quickly realize he's bigger, stronger and can throw his weight around however he likes. But he can't learn if you don't lead and teach. I'd like to meet a baby who hasn't tried at some time or another to take a nice nip out of someone. It's how baby horses interact, running, nipping and playing with each other :) He just wants to play but that's a BIG no no way to play with a person.

BTW I wanna see pics! I just love liver chestnuts.
     
    05-23-2011, 08:20 PM
  #5
Weanling
I agree. You need to nip the behavior in the bud. If it continues, you may very well see the biting get worse.
I can almost guarantee you that if he is allowed to continue to assert dominance over you, his behavior will get worse, possibly to the point where he is dangerous. I have seen it time and time again and don't want people getting hurt.
You need to be firm with him and let him know that you are alpha mare in your herd of two.
Sounds like he is a smart colt, that will help. Once his lower brains are removed, he ought to be a tad easier to deal with as far as the biting goes. Horses are herd animals that need a pecking order to be comfortable. Don't allow yourself to be anything less than top of it.
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    05-24-2011, 03:39 AM
  #6
Foal
I will get pictures soon... he is beautiful!

One more thing.... I came on my period yesterday - 2 days early (co-incidence I hope) but will he be frisky around me...?? I remember years ago my mums friend wouldn't let me go near her stallion when I was 'on'...
     
    05-24-2011, 08:11 AM
  #7
Weanling
Your period has nothing to do with your horse's behavior. By that time, your hormone level has balanced back out.
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    05-24-2011, 08:25 AM
  #8
Foal
I agree, ignoring dangerous behavior will bring nothing but the horse trying you more and more and see how much he can get away with. You need to exert your dominance, let him know you're the boss :)
I just bought a yearling stud colt last month, so I sympathize :) Fortunately he has not tried anything dangerous/quick like biting or kicking or rearing, he does slow motion using his strength, so as my teacher/trainer has told me "can't ever be stronger than a horse, have to be smarter" LOL he's getting better about respecting MY space, it's a daily lesson :))

And I ALSO am anxious to see pics of your little guy. My colt I thought was a liver (tobiano) when I bought him, but he has shed out, and now i'm thinking either silver dapple or smoky black, but I'm told he could still possibly be a liver chestnut.
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    05-24-2011, 11:52 AM
  #9
Foal
He was sooo lovely today... I spent time with him in the field just poo picking, had lunch, moving electric tape... he kept follwing me about wherever I went n occasionally went in for a nip... so I just 'shhhhd' him n threwmy arm towrds him... in the afternoon he didnt even try it.... ANNDD let me giv him I cuddle when he was laying down! I LOVE HIM <3
Obviously being a colt I am keeping him on his own untill he loses his manhood but he has made good friends with the cows in the next field...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg romeo n cow.jpg (90.5 KB, 134 views)
     
    05-24-2011, 12:02 PM
  #10
Foal
His colour looks lovely in the sun
Attached Images
File Type: jpg romeooo.jpg (85.2 KB, 124 views)
     

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