New Colt misbehaving badly need help - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 04:10 AM Thread Starter
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New Colt misbehaving badly need help

hi everyone , I just purchased a new colt about 2 months ago , he behaved perfectly before and now all of a sudden he is kicking at me and biting out of no were. I plan on getting him gelded but I am not to sure what to do about this behavior he turns 2 in march and he is bred to be a cutting horse. He kicks at me while lunging him while walking him. He wont let me groom him anymore. I have had horses all my life but I've never had a colt before. I am lost on what to do . I just want to fix things before they get even more out of control . I also have him in a stall for the winter. He is well fed and taken care of
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post #2 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 04:24 AM
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Geld the horse ASAP which is your first problem and then get a trainer to help you. A few lessons with a trainer to show you what to do would be a great help in getting this guy back in line. He may try to hurt you at first depending on how bad its become. He could kick you or strike you if you do not have the ability to recognise his disrespectful body language right now. Not just the kicking but barging his shoulder into you, getting into your space, etc...All that has to be nipped in the bud and he must walk the line of being respectful.

I guarentee this horse didnt just start doing this out of the blue. He pushed and tested his limits with you over the last 2 months you have had him and you didnt recognise it enough to nip it in the bud. Now he has taken over as is natural. A young stallion is not something an inexperianced handler should be dealing with becaseu of these types of problems. As was said before on another thread, you can't take anything out of a horses head once its in there. So making a bunch of mistakes is not the best way to start a young horse.

Mind you, im not saying you arent a good horseperson. Im saying you are in over your head with this particular guy and real live help even if just a few times would be a great boon so you know what is appropriate. Geld him and teach him groundwork for respect in a nutshell.

Also, Clinton Anderson has some great roundpenning and groundwork videos that can help you learn to earn this guys respect and make him a great member of equine society worst case. His demos are very easy to understand.

Last edited by Trinity3205; 02-14-2011 at 04:29 AM.
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post #3 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 04:52 AM
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I don't think your young cold would have started doing this suddenly, did you notice that your horse started becoming more pushy as time went by? I would reccomend getting the horse gelded sooner rather than later, because as you mentioned you planned on getting it done so it would help with the process of training.

I think - that by yourself you are not ready to handle a young colt and that you should get a trainer to help you work with the horse and show it the correct way of working and respect as if you let the horse simply get away with the incorrect behaviour or if you don't resolve it correctly it ill cause more damage in the long run. I hope everything goes well and please keep us updated.

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post #4 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 04:58 AM
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trinity3205 brings up some worthy points.

Also, you mention he's "well fed", perhaps (depending on his performance future and where he is in his physical development) temporarilly you should get him onto a low energy diet.

Of course this should never be a replacement for good horsemanship, but having said that, X horse with not much energy/fizz is far easier and safer to teach basic ground manners too than X horse with plenty of energy/fizz.
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post #5 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 05:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher View Post
trinity3205 brings up some worthy points.

Also, you mention he's "well fed", perhaps (depending on his performance future and where he is in his physical development) temporarilly you should get him onto a low energy diet.

of course this should never be a replacement for good horsemanship, but having said that, X horse with not much energy/fizz is far easier and safer to teach basic ground manners too than X horse with plenty of energy/fizz.
I agree with this alot, a horse with less energy is alot safer and easier to work with. What are you feeding the horse? What is their paddock like? How long do they spend out on the pasture?

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post #6 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 12:37 PM Thread Starter
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His being agressive and all that did just come out of the blue he wasn't testy at all before , I will follow your guys's advice and geld him and perhaps change his diet he is on alfalfa and a. 4 way mix hay. I went out of town for a week and when I got back his behavior was like this. I am worried about investing in a trainer when he's still a year away from being able to start riding. Sory about the bad gramar and such I'm sending this from my phone. So after he is gelded will he calm down allot or just slowley?
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post #7 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 12:37 PM Thread Starter
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post #8 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 12:38 PM Thread Starter
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Oh and he is in an indoor stall. Not much pasture time but I do lundge him
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post #9 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by ChingazMyBoy View Post
I don't think your young cold would have started doing this suddenly, did you notice that your horse started becoming more pushy as time went by?
Sorry but I disagree. Colts do have testerone surges and do start acting up seemingly over night.
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post #10 of 16 Old 02-14-2011, 05:14 PM
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Sorry but I disagree. Colts do have testerone surges and do start acting up seemingly over night.
lol just think of a teenager in puberty :P all of a sudden they don't like there parents anymore, start rebelling and testing authority. He probably feels like he owns the world right now!

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