New horse doesnt stand to be mounted
   

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New horse doesnt stand to be mounted

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  • Why horse is wont move when mounted
  • Horse doesnt stand still to mount

 
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    06-27-2011, 01:14 PM
  #1
Yearling
New horse doesnt stand to be mounted

If you look in the critique section, I put a post about Possible 2nd horse- please critique- which I have now put a deposit on. I have the vet going to see him Wednesday and that will determine sale or not.

The only vice I know of is he doesnt stand to be mounted. He is 19 years old, so is this something I have to learn to deal with or something I can probably break him of?

He is awesome otherwise. I sometimes get stage fright right before getting on a horse. But my current gelding is awesome and wont move til i'm on. I taught my guy to stand though. Is it a lost cause since he's 19? Or just something to work with him on?
     
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    06-27-2011, 01:29 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
If you did it once, you can do it again. I know there are some threads on teaching a horse to stand for mounting. I have not done it but have worked with horses that aren't good for mounting, but aren't horrible either.
     
    06-27-2011, 01:38 PM
  #3
Foal
Try flexing him before you get on by the mounting block then once you're on him flex him some more so he doesn't think that as soon as you get on he's supposed to go. It worked on a 20 year old appy I used to ride.
     
    06-27-2011, 01:45 PM
  #4
Trained
One thing you can do is mount up and instantly demand a step backwards. It works with my boy. If they're being particularly antsy you can also bring their head around towards you because the only thing they can do then is go in circles - nowhere near as dangerous as the potential for them to go galloping off when you've only got one foot in a stirrup!

Something else that may work is to get on and get straight back off again, and keep doing it until he stands nicely - and then you don't ride, because the aim of even getting on was to get him to stand for you to mount him, and he gave you that, so he needs to be rewarded for it.

Another tactic that one of Western Australia's top horsemen uses, is to use the horse as an armchair - he will literally read a book and have a beer on horseback! In the round pen of course. It's incredibly effective. This horseman can start a horse and have it calm and settled under saddle with CHAOS going on around it in 4 days. Mind you he spends 7-8 hours a day in the saddle and will spend as long as it takes to get what he wants out of the horse.

Not standing for mounting is actually a very common vice with older schoolmaster types. They know their job so well that they know that when you get on they have to work and so they do so without even being asked. What YOU need to do, is break that connection between mounting and moving forwards. That's where the backing and the 'armchair tactic' are useful. It may take some time, but it works.

Also, if you can, having someone hold him for you to mount is very helpful. Very very few pro horse trainers go it alone for the first few rides. Most of the GOOD ones don't even ask the horse to move the first few times they mount up. It's scary enough to have a person up there without the added pressure of trying to find your balance now that your weight's going in different places!

Oh, also - do EVERYTHING 3 times. Every session. Even if it's an instant of standing still, if it's an improvement, you praise it. On the 3rd session, be prepared to settle for a little less. 3rd time anything is tricky with horses. I don't know why - it just IS.
     
    06-27-2011, 10:53 PM
  #5
Foal
I think that even though the potential new horse is 19 y/o, he can still learn how to be mounted properly. It may take a little longer to teach him, but he can still learn for sure.
I liked the posts about flexing each side and then flexing once you get into the saddle, so you don't take off and ride right away. The only extra tidbit that has worked for me in the past is to make their feet move if they try and walk away. For example: I will slightly flex my left rein and have the horses head to the left so that when I mount and they want to move, I can flex them around and their hindquarters will go the opposite way and avoid stepping on me. Once they have moved their feet, I will take my foot out of the stirrup and MAKE them WORK from the ground. I will have them yield their hindquarters or lunge a few circles and change directions. Once they have calmed down, I will repeat the process. They learn that it is just easier to stand still and moving means more work. Good luck!!
     
    06-28-2011, 09:16 PM
  #6
Weanling
I bought a 17 year old mare about two months ago who would move off as soon as you mounted her (often when you were still in the air), would not stand still on the lead or when you were on her back, and within a week or two she would stand quietly and does not move off until I tell her to. I got her over it simply by backing her up every single time she tried to move without my cue, whether I was on her or not. Every action she makes that I don't ask for gets a reaction from me. Granted, she wasn't terrible at it, and it's not like she bolted every time I got on, but I would say definitely you can teach your guy to stand.
     
    06-28-2011, 09:52 PM
  #7
Weanling
Don't worry about age... my mom's horse was "unridable" until he was 20. He's been happily trained and had a long winning stint as a barrel racer, and is now learning english. He's 27 now, and i'm still doing training rides on him. You teach a horse something every time you interact with it, even old horses... it might just take ( a lot) longer. Patience will be needed =)
     
    06-29-2011, 08:32 AM
  #8
Yearling
Thanks everyone. I do want to point out, he's not galloping off, or any of the sort. He just slowly walks away from the mounting block. I think it should be a relatively easy fix (though I do expect to put time and effort into it). Today is the day I do a vet check on him, and if all goes well, he'll be mine!!!

I'm so excited!! Now to find someone time ride with so I can take both my horses out together ;)
     
    06-29-2011, 03:53 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LetAGrlShowU    
Thanks everyone. I do want to point out, he's not galloping off, or any of the sort. He just slowly walks away from the mounting block. I think it should be a relatively easy fix (though I do expect to put time and effort into it). Today is the day I do a vet check on him, and if all goes well, he'll be mine!!!

I'm so excited!! Now to find someone time ride with so I can take both my horses out together ;)
It sounds like he won't be too difficult. Good luck
     
    06-29-2011, 05:25 PM
  #10
Showing
I mount from the ground not with a block, but for me I've always used backing up to teach them to stand still for mounting. If they take a step as you are going to put a foot in the stirrup, back them up. Also once you've mounted, make him stand quiet for 30 seconds or so, walking right off essentially teaches one to move while mounting. I'd guess at his age that's probably where his problem stems from. Whatever method you try, be consistent & it will turn around in no time!
     

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