New to lunging and VERY proud!
 
 

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New to lunging and VERY proud!

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  • Horse sore back lunging fart
  • horse forum lunge whip length

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    11-08-2011, 04:58 AM
  #1
Weanling
New to lunging and VERY proud!

I've been so slack lately with getting to see my horse and ride due to personal circumstance and when I saw her on Saturday I decided to put her on the lunge before taking her out because although she is 6 years old, she is very green and at 17hh she has potential to be very strong!

She was free lunged when she was broken in but has never been on a lunge line. She looked at me like I was mad (I'm rather inexperienced with lunging too) and even the whip didnt encourage her. Eventually I just used the end of the line in a swinging motion and she got going.

She started off really fast at a trot, almost making me dizzy! She had her buck and then settled down. I used a single pole to slow her down a bit and help her concentrate.

I never over did it. Baby steps, but she did so well and we ended on a really positive note and I was really proud of both of us. I must admit, due to her strength and pulling me on the line I was very sore the next day! I'm 50kgs against her! Ha ha!
     
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    11-08-2011, 05:26 AM
  #2
Green Broke
:O
Mine is a 6yo 18.1hh WB and I'm only 56kgs ;)
How do you lunge?? Don't make her scared of the whip, but let her know it is there, and she needs to have a bit of respect for it, even if it the end just touches her slightly.
When you stand in the middle of that circle, you need to position yourself at the hind quarters of the horse for 'forward' and the shoulders for 'woah stop/slow'

I would advise lunging in a good headcollar, even if her bridle is underneath. If you're both inexperienced it will help make sure you don't accidently jab.

Do you have a round pen, or an indoor school that you can mark half off with high jumps so she's enclosed? That way you can do the proper lunge work, then free lunge a bit afterwards as a reward to her.

Make sure her inside ear is on you and she's listening. When she goes too fast, position yourself in front of her shoulder (whilst still being in the middle of the school ;) ) and use your voice to bring her down, a half halt on the inside rein, just work in walk and trot till you're confident you have your tranisitons and she's listening to you.

Lunging is a great great work out for them providing done properly, and a quicker work out then riding!!

Well done to you for trying something new though :)

Oh, and wear gloves :) If for whatever reason she does pull, you won't get rope burn!
     
    11-08-2011, 07:25 AM
  #3
Weanling
After that session I will be wearing gloves!

Unfortunately I have to use the jumping arena as we don't have a proper lunge ring :( I use the corner and there were jumps blocking it off nicely so the area is confined to a point

She did a lot of Natural Horsemanship work when she was broken in so she was desensitised to the whip which I feel is good. Before I started I made sure she was ok with the whip touching her all over her body and the rein as well. She didn't mind it at all. But I left it on the ground eventually and worked without it because she was happy to work without it.

Im lucky enough to have a proper fitting lunge cavesson that doesnt move and fits nice and snug due to her size. As she gets the hang of it I plan to introduce other aids but I want to use the correct ones so as not to do more harm than good and I will get proper advice before I use anything else. She was only broken in at about 4 or 5 years old so she is new to all this and Im proud she did so well.

I think her rushing was pure excitement and pent up energy! After 5 minutes and a pole she slowed down slightly.

Any advice on teaching her the verbal commands such as "woah"? Even when I moved towards her front she kept moving and it took a while to get her to stop! I like the half halt idea although due to her inexperience she still needs to learn those properly.
     
    11-08-2011, 08:00 AM
  #4
Green Broke
Sounds like you've made great progress

Personally for me, I like the whip to be my form of defence, so to speak. Don't need to freak the horse out with it, but if the horse gets too close, I can send it out, send it forward, use it to help stop. If I free lunge and a horse charges, I can use it to send the horse away (Whilst running around screaming.. happened last christmas with a stallion!! Let it off, and it just charged me!) and therefor, if anything were to happen, I has a whip :)

For stopping, you need to be assertive. Not aggressive, that when a horse will back up, hop up, or spin around to get away. Again, make sure you have whip in hand, and pointed to the bum to try and prevent any turning. I ask, Waaallkkkk and take a step forwards towards the horse, but infront of where the horse is going.. you get what I mean? That way, if the horse doesn't, I can position myself infront of the horse, not directly, that would be silly lol, but enough to block the path. This is another good reason to have the lunge whip as they're less likely to barge past you.
Duffy had some REAL bad manners, would do her own thing, and when I asked her to do my things, she'd go up, flash pretty hooves at me, spin, and gallop off as fast as possible in the other direction! Long lunge whip against her butt twice sorted that out.
If she doesn't listen the first time, I give the lunge line a good ol tug, which is why using a headcollar is good for green horses, I've never used a cavesson before so can't comment on them :)
     
    11-08-2011, 08:26 AM
  #5
Weanling
Great advice :) thank you so much! I get exactly what you mean :)

I like te cavesson because it doesnt move around or slip at all and is padded nicely. The rings on the top of the noseband make changing legs easier as it swivels.

I must say, when she started to work and I felt that power on the end of the line and saw how beautifully she moved it was an incredible feeling :) I will get someone to take some photos next time.

Perhaps I can introduce the whip as we go along. I need to get her fit, start working her slowly in jumping and eventually I aim to get her to her first training show :) I feel very positive about her future :)
     
    11-08-2011, 08:29 AM
  #6
Green Broke
No problems, glad I could help!

I might try one out :O

It is amazing to watch how much power they really have.. especially when they have a buck and a fart!! You think to yourself.. you dare do that under saddle and you're sausages!!

Lunging is great to build their fitness up, and means you don't have to ride if you're having a lazy day xD x
     
    11-08-2011, 08:54 AM
  #7
Weanling
That is EXACTLY why I put her on the lunge before getting on! Ha ha!

The cavesson is great in my opinion. It has a brow band as well so it fits well.
     
    11-08-2011, 09:55 AM
  #8
Showing
Well done :) Yeah lunging on the lungeline is a form of art :P haha

But with the stopping thing, she won't have a clue what you mean until you teach it to her.
So even when you hand walk her to the barn or you're bringing her in from the fields, practice the stop! Say whoah or ho or whichever one you use when you are about to stop and make sure she does. Then when you go back to lunging and you're just asking for a walk, she'll have a better idea of what stop means.

And I'm not sure how well she knows the other words like trot, canter, reverse (turn and go the other direction... probably not a good idea on a lungeline), over. But start teaching those transitions every chance you get. Like if she's tied up, push on her side where your leg would go and say "over" or "move" and then when you go back to lunging.. the dots will start connecting in her horsey mind :)

Then you can start teaching her if you stop all motion, she stops. If you point to her ribcage she moves over, if your steps get wider she gets faster, etc.
     
    11-11-2011, 07:55 AM
  #9
Weanling
That is really helpful advice - sometime I overlook the simple things like teaching commands when we arent training. She is a fast learner, but totally green so she knows nothing! And she can be a real tank at times and bowl me over when she decides to do her own thing so perhaps these commands will help her on the lunge and in hand generally.

Thank you for all the advice! I will be training tomorrow and sunday so I will update how it went!
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    11-11-2011, 09:14 AM
  #10
Showing
Yeah we forget that they don't speak English nor understand that any of the stuff we use on them actually is :P

But yeah I've been training my greenie so I know quite a lot about ground handling.. so if you need any pointers, I'm willing to offer what I know and you can decide what to do with it :)
DuffyDuck likes this.
     

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