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New Owner; 23 month old Horse & 9yr old tips?

This is a discussion on New Owner; 23 month old Horse & 9yr old tips? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horseandtenn

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    12-21-2011, 04:40 PM
  #11
Foal
I was thinking the same thing as HUSAngel. He looks younger but he may be a pony....
     
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    12-21-2011, 06:55 PM
  #12
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppaloosaLover88    
I was thinking the same thing as HUSAngel. He looks younger but he may be a pony....
Supposed to be Quarter Horse and Tenn Walker. That is unconfirmed though so I can't be 100% on that.
     
    12-21-2011, 08:01 PM
  #13
Foal
They looks like a mare and foal pair, with the youngster being about yearling age. Et them wormed though, for all types of parasite. I don't like the look of that belly on the foal if they have been on a restricted diet.
     
    12-26-2011, 07:59 AM
  #14
Foal
If they were really short on rations for a long time, the youngster may be stunted. Which will be okay in the long run once you get him back to proper chow. I'm wondering if I see a "wormy" potbelly on him, and if he has worms the other one would too. I'm glad you've got worming started, but remember it can take a while and different medications to get them all. The vet is going to be your friend.

The older horse definitely looks skinny enough to me that I'm sure 20 minutes of riding really did exhaust him. Get a couple hundred pounds on him, then you could start riding him on some walks. They're a great way to build up muscle and endurance, and would get you some riding & training time too. Short walks at first, 15 minutes, then 20, then half an hour at a time. Once he can walk at a good pace for half an hour without seeming tired, you can mix in some trotting. The young fellow needs to know how to stand tied, how to pick up his feet for the farrier, and how to be away from his friend without pitching a fit. All for just 5-10 minutes at a time. The rule of thumb I've heard is train for no more than 15 minutes at a time, and the number of times per week is the same as the horse's age. So since he's not yet two, twice a week would be plenty (and only once a day). He still needs to be a baby.

Thank you for rescuing this pair! I think they found their angel.
CecilliaB likes this.
     
    12-26-2011, 11:35 AM
  #15
Green Broke
I'm glad you saved them, that was their lucky day.
The baby should be seen by a farrier ASAP for those front legs & does the gelding have something wrong with his eye?
Have you named them yet?
     
    12-26-2011, 12:56 PM
  #16
Started
First off, safety first. Get those halters off. They should only be on when you are with them or working them. They will leave pemanent scars on the 2 year olds head as his skull is still growing and the halters can get caught up in fencing, hoofs when scratching their heads... and they can snap their neck. The 2 year old will grab the older horse's while playing and get his jaw wedged under it and not be able to let go. If you're leaving them on because you can't catch them, than that's the first lesson they need.

Agreed that the baby needs some work with his front feet yesterday. Your farrier will be your best source of advice on that one but limit his first farrier visit to his front feet. He won't have the skills to stand there and behave for all 4 feet. Keep the other horse right next to him to keep him quiet and to reassure him.

Weither he's 20 months or 23 months is immaterial at this point. Was he born in Jan or in April? Doesn't matter. What does matter is he is behind and at his age he can do some major catching up with good nutrition and managment. The key is to do it over a period of time. Measure his height and take pictures of him every month to make sure he's not growing too fast. Your pasture looks like it's still in decent shape. How much forage is it providing? Are you having to supplement hay? What is the feed they are eating? The 2 year old needs to be on a higher plane of nutrition than the older horse to provide everything he needs to grow and catch up so one size fits all does not apply here. Give him his own place to eat at his own pace. The older horse will probably not share with him as they both improve plus you need to know how much they are both eating as individuals. Pull the older horse out at meal time, tie him up and let him eat. Younger horses typically take more time to eat so give him an extra 15 minutes to clean things up. The bloated look they both have could be worms and it could also be from eating very mature, high fiber forage. Add a pre/probiotic to both of their diets for a month to get a nice bacerial flora going that can help digest all the feed they're getting.
     
    12-26-2011, 12:59 PM
  #17
Yearling
Everyone has given great advice and I have just one bit to add. If malnutrition is involved please be careful to ease them into their new diet, especially when dealing with ridding them of parasites. Be sure that there is a steady progress toward a better diet, not to much to soon. They are lucky to have a kind caring owner now :)
     
    12-27-2011, 10:12 PM
  #18
Foal
Thank you everyone for the advise. The kids were so very happy and totally shocked that I got them the horses for Christmas. Since getting them we have been spending lots of time with them. I can see that we are gaining their trust. Esp with the little horse.

Today was the first day that we was able to actually lead Trigger (young horse) around with the lead rope. Yesterday me and the kids spent ALL day out there with them and we really noticed that they were starting to love on us....rubbing their heads on us and other things.
Today when we went out there after work Trigger ran right up to us and we put the lead rope on. After a min of him locking his front legs refusing to go forward we walked him in some circles and then he followed like a puppy. It felt good to know that he finally let us do that.

On a side note....I got bucked off Man-Man (big horse). I found that when we first went out there they expected to be fed and then they didnt want to leave the food area. I fed them and then after a while I saddled him up and tried to ride him to the back. I walked about 150 yards and all was good but when I turned around and he seen the feeding area he took off like a rocked and gave one good buck which was enough to send me flying. Landed on my hip and my head slammed the ground and I was just about knocked out. He ran to the food but I did go gather him up and got back on him just to show him that it was not okay.

At the note of some people on here....I am going about some things differently. One, we are not feeding them right when we go out there but waiting a while. We are just walking them around right now building up their strength and stamina. I have walked the kids around on him but no more than 10 min. He has done fine.

I don't think he was being mean and trying to buck me off because I seen him do the same thing heading to the feeding area without anyone on him.

Me, learning as I do and with the help of forum members realized that I need to do more ground work with him before I attempt to ride him myself.
He does do good with the kids though.

Trying to still set up the vet this week.

Have not noticed any worms in their poop. (not sure if I would or not)

Still open to any pointers as I am learning and enjoying doing so.
     

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