New problem- bucking/rearing barn sour
   

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New problem- bucking/rearing barn sour

This is a discussion on New problem- bucking/rearing barn sour within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Stop bucking rearing
  • How to stop rearing and bu king

View Poll Results: what do I do to stop bucking/rearing?
turn him back around in opposite direction he wants. 2 33.33%
turn tight circle, kick and make stand still? 4 66.67%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 6. You may not vote on this poll

 
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    01-31-2010, 10:18 PM
  #1
Foal
Unhappy New problem- bucking/rearing barn sour

I have an older horse. He's recently alone- the other boarders left about 2 months ago. Now all he wants to do is eat in pasture, not be rode, he doesn't want to lunge he'll go about twice around and turn into me and stop. When I take him out he's okay going out- but on way back towards the barn he'll buck/rare tries goes fast if you hold him back or turn him around he doesn't care- he still acts up. I don't know what to do to stop this behavior. It use to be anyone could ride him now just me, and he still does this with me.. I need some advice please.
     
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    01-31-2010, 11:50 PM
  #2
Yearling
First off. If he is alone that's not very good for them mentally. Can you find a pasture mate for him? A goat, a mini, a companion horse? I'm not condoning his actions by any means but a horse that's alone has a lot of mental stuff going on and he might just have huge separation anxiety problems. When it's a mental problem like that you're not going to get a whole lot of training done to improve his attitude.

That being said, maybe he's just being a prick. Does he buck then when you pull him up he rears? Or does he rear and then start bucking/hopping around? A horse that bucks and then rears goes from GO to WHOA too fast and has nowhere to go with that frustration but up. So when you feel him start to tense you need to move his feet and keep his head up. If his head is up he can't buck and if his feet are moving he can't rear. So start doing the "drunk walk" or "snake"...many terms for the same principle. Move him a little to the left then a little to the right, or in some cases do a circle to the left and a circle to the right. Don't do small circles, because that slows him down and puts him back on his haunches making it easy for him to rear. Do 10-15 meter circles or if it's on a narrow trail, turn him almost sideways to the trail, then go almost sideways the other way but keep his feet moving. If he tries to bolt, don't just clamp. Use the catch and release method, sharp tug then release for a second, sharper tug, then release or tug one rein, release, tug the other. You want to get him unbalanced and then he will slow down. Best case scenario is to make him go in a huge circle, but like I said I don't know if you're in a small trail or riding through fields. Basically you don't want to completely stop his feet, that lets him buck/rear and all the bad stuff. Keep him moving and occupied but on your terms at the pace you want.
     
    02-01-2010, 01:20 AM
  #3
Trained
The above is good advice but I will add that you should get him moving away from your leg and keep those feet busy all the way home. Do half passes and counterbends and leg yeilds in both directions. Relax a little and if he travels well then leave him alone. If he screws around then do some more.
     
    02-01-2010, 08:41 AM
  #4
Yearling
Kevins, not to steal the thread. But if you have a horse that easily collects enough to rear and/or get his head down to buck. Does it really work to collect them up with leg yields and half passes? I've always found that if you collect them up that much, you're just asking for a rear so I generally play follow the nose with rearers. If they are decently trained, then follow the nose keeps the legs moving and then they are too strung out to get a good rear or buck going. Just my personal experience talking though...always open to new ideas =P. I'm also a an event rider though so to me leg yields and half passes on a nervy or tense horse equals a fair amount of tension on the mouth and collection with your legs. Maybe you do it differently?
     
    02-01-2010, 11:08 AM
  #5
Trained
For a horse to rear or buck it has to be straight from it's nose to tail. If you have a bend anywhere in between you can prevent them from bucking or rearing. I ride western so I don't pull alot on a horses mouth. When a horse does leg yeilds and half-passes and other movements that require a little more though than just walking forward it can work to take the horses mind off of going home. Another thing I would try is to work really hard around the barn then ride away and let him rest. If he doesn't want to rest then that's fine let him go back and work some more.
     
    02-01-2010, 10:56 PM
  #6
Foal
So Niclobaugh have you noticed the common theme in their very sound advice? It's all about work. Getting your horse to relate bucking or raring to having to do extra work is the key. The horse will avoid extra work at all cost if they are completely sure that's what is coming next. As for the safest way to get that done, both kevinshorses and NittanyEquestrian have great ideas that work. I can recall using both types of methods they described, it just depends on the horse. The key though is to have the horse thinking "maybe I should buck or rare to get away from this pressure, um, maybe not because I know there is extra work coming next if I do that".
     
    02-02-2010, 01:45 AM
  #7
Foal
More arena and in hand work at home will help and be sure to add lots of emotional stimuli. Speed, changes, spook work, new lessons, anything that gets your horse a bit upset then bring him down again. A horse that is soft and giving cannot be bucking and rearing.

Take shorter rides and try to just get him to the starting point of being upset, then work the exercises you did in the arena until he is quiet and then leave him alone. Get down if you need to be safe, but work him until he is quiet.

I correct rearing and bucking with the same pre-taught cue, disengaging the hip. Get that cue solid in the arena meaning he does it softly from all gaits. Also, work on shoulders in the arena. The more body parts he is soft and responsive to at home under pressure, the more control you will have away from home.

Go on working trail rides. It is mind draining, but initiate all moves, go around bushes, rocks, whatever. Do circles, serpentine, yield shoulders, hips, stop, back up. Keep him thinking about you and staying soft. As he gets better, let him alone when he is quiet, work him when you see him think about acting up.

Trail riding can suck a lot of training out of your horse because we like to drop the reins and enjoy the ride. The longer you go without asking your horse to do something, even if it is to just softening his jaw, the more time he is spending doing what he wants. This is not to imply you should have constant contact on the bit. Every request should end with softness from the horse and a release of the rein from the rider. The better your horse becomes, the smaller the request can get, but we should always check it now and again to be sure we are on the same ride. : )
     

Tags
bad behavior, barn sour, bucking, rearing up

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