The New "In" Thing--Riding Yearlings (rant)
 
 

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The New "In" Thing--Riding Yearlings (rant)

This is a discussion on The New "In" Thing--Riding Yearlings (rant) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Riding a long yearling tb at walk
  • When yearlings jump fences

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    01-12-2013, 06:55 PM
  #1
Yearling
The New "In" Thing--Riding Yearlings (rant)

Where oh where to I start....


Is it just me or have you noticed that people are riding their yearlings more often? No I'm not talking about the futurity horses, race horses, etc. I'm talking about back-yard breeder, rider, etc. people.

I have been on facebook and I've noticed that people think its somehow okay to ride a yearling, some of these people have a lot of experience but others don't even know what a gelding is!

I mean...I don't know where people get the idea that its okay to ride a yearling. You wouldn't ask a 1 year old kid to carry a 25lb bag would you? If you answered yes, I feel for you child.

But am I the only one whos noticing this?
Please don't start a fight.

Thanks.
WickedNag, Army wife and Cane Toad like this.
     
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    01-12-2013, 06:58 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I have not witnessed it, and hope I never do!
     
    01-12-2013, 07:01 PM
  #3
Started
Some people do it for the money, some people do it because they are uneducated...

People seem to get the impression that by overpowering a horse by riding it as a yearling, they have somehow mastered the art of breaking. Yearlings are so small and unbalanced, they hardly put up a fight, and are too dumb to know what's really going on.

It's just people who are too coward to teach their horse anything and think they need to overpower it to train it. I have the same beef with people who "tie-train" month-old babies. It's not training, it's just because they wear out faster and give up.

It's a dangerous way of thinking, because you'll always have to "up" yourself to overpower your horse, bigger spurs, bigger bits, bigger chains.

But the fact is, a human cannot overpower a horse kindly. I prefer humans use their superior "brains" to be educators, not masters.
     
    01-12-2013, 07:04 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
Some people do it for the money, some people do it because they are uneducated...

People seem to get the impression that by overpowering a horse by riding it as a yearling, they have somehow mastered the art of breaking. Yearlings are so small and unbalanced, they hardly put up a fight, and are too dumb to know what's really going on.

It's just people who are too coward to teach their horse anything and think they need to overpower it to train it. I have the same beef with people who "tie-train" month-old babies. It's not training, it's just because they wear out faster and give up.

It's a dangerous way of thinking, because you'll always have to "up" yourself to overpower your horse, bigger spurs, bigger bits, bigger chains.

But the fact is, a human cannot overpower a horse kindly. I prefer humans use their superior "brains" to be educators, not masters.
Couldn't have said it better.
barrelbeginner likes this.
     
    01-12-2013, 07:14 PM
  #5
Started
I agree in the same vein I cringe when a FB friend posts pictures of their 3 year old jumping 3 ft fences. I know that's not huge in the whole scheme of things but on the other hand they are still babies. I know I can't throw stones as harness horses are raced as two year olds. That said when our boy started having "growing pains" and got bad gaited the trainer gave him time off. He did not make the races this year, he can try again next year as a big 17 hand three year old.
PunksTank likes this.
     
    01-12-2013, 07:21 PM
  #6
Super Moderator
It's horrible. And in part, big trainers can be blamed. They start youngster as long yearlings, to have them ready for the big money in time. And the lay person says, if the big ones do it, it must be okay.
As for standies, yeah, they race as two year olds, but from what I've seen, the initial training is slow and steady and, they don't carry weight!!!!
     
    01-12-2013, 07:26 PM
  #7
Yearling
I backed a couple of long yearling TB's. I was asked/hired to and I spent under ten minutes on their backs. He wanted me to do more but as I was working with these colts with the saddle I could tell they were not developed. I ended up backing them bareback and only ever walked them. I won't ever do it again. I have done more research and know better now. These horses went to the track the next year (small 'bush track' Marquis Downs in Saskatoon).
I am coming to realize what ages are young for horses. I always thought five was old (not really old, just middle aged). Now I'm finding out that they're actually still considered babies at five.
     
    01-12-2013, 07:36 PM
  #8
Started
True standies don't carry weight in the USA. They are also warmed up a whole lot better (IMHO) before a race than a thoroughbred is before a race. Which means they are less likely to get a traumatic injury. They also race at a "slower gate", which does help in some ways.

Part of the trend is the result of these amazing winning horses that are winning big shows at 2-3 year olds. The lay horse person sees them win, thinks hey how about that, I should do that. These horses go on to stallion or brood mare careers at age 5. Which is good because those that continue showing into an advanced age end up with not just physical but mental issues (burnout/ring sour).
     
    01-12-2013, 08:12 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
A friend of mine had one of those, one that didn't make the cut for the big-$$$ reining futurity. This particular trainer worked with one in Germany and sold the burned out horses for big money to him. The mare became broodmare, had a nice filly who we put in training for the weanling futurity. Trainer thought it would be cute to have the owner's kid do showmanship with the mare. Everything went fine at the training facility, the boy was all proud that he could do it. When he entered the arena at the show, the mare COMPLETELY freaked, we had to pull her out, no show for the kid. She was a fine husband horse for slow trails, but as soon as you asked for something, she would shut down and nearly had a heart attack. She was physically sound, but mentally destroyed.
     
    01-12-2013, 08:18 PM
  #10
Super Moderator
Heck, I don't like to see people riding their two year olds.
     

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