The New "In" Thing--Riding Yearlings (rant) - Page 3
   

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The New "In" Thing--Riding Yearlings (rant)

This is a discussion on The New "In" Thing--Riding Yearlings (rant) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        01-13-2013, 08:26 AM
      #21
    Foal
    I've seen this alot, mostly under my own roof. My family used to race Tbs. So my dad is always on me to ride my filly, when I got her she was about a yr old. He said "you should have been on that horse, out and about". Well I've been waiting, she is now about 4, NOW I need to be doing stuff with her. Not big heavy duty stuff just a few laps out in the small back pasture.
         
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        01-13-2013, 08:52 AM
      #22
    Foal
    All I can say is "Thank the show world" and thank you for bringing it up. I raise proformance bred reining horses and constatly hear the line that they should be getting started at 18 months old. Sorry, I think too much of the long term welfare of the horse. As yearlings, they are still babies, mentally and physically. Will my horses ever make the "big time", probably not at the futurity level. I have a reining bred mare that went through this as a youngin". Didn't make the cut for the futurity and it took me two years to get her to just be a "horse" again. Took another year to get her deprogrammed of reining patterns. Its all she knew and yes she was a serious handful the first time I rode her out of the arena! Is she still a reiner? Yes, but one that won't freak out when out of the reining environment. Good on ya for speaking out on this subject!
         
        01-13-2013, 09:01 AM
      #23
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    heck, I don't like to see people riding their two year olds.

    Totally agree let them be babies. I wont back a horse until they are at least 3 and only then if well grown.
         
        01-13-2013, 01:16 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    It's about business. Horses are stock. Some of us love them as pets, but I'm not going to fault someone for doing what makes a successful business. It's like having a pet pig and getting mad at people who butcher their pigs. But we all still eat bacon
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        01-13-2013, 01:21 PM
      #25
    Foal
    I think this is a very good article and everyone wanting to back a horse should read it first:

    http://www.distanceriding.org/php/ar...h/Function.pdf
         
        01-13-2013, 01:27 PM
      #26
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tiffanyodonnell    
    It's about business. Horses are stock. Some of us love them as pets, but I'm not going to fault someone for doing what makes a successful business. It's like having a pet pig and getting mad at people who butcher their pigs. But we all still eat bacon
    Posted via Mobile Device

    But if you damage your stock by treating them incorrectly then that is simply management and bad for business. Yearligs are no way ready to be ridden their bones are not developed enough.
    Red Cedar Farm likes this.
         
        01-13-2013, 01:43 PM
      #27
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Clava    
    But if you damage your stock by treating them incorrectly then that is simply management and bad for business. Yearligs are no way ready to be ridden their bones are not developed enough.
    Sorry that should read "bad management"

    (and yearlings)
         
        01-13-2013, 01:47 PM
      #28
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tiffanyodonnell    
    It's about business. Horses are stock. Some of us love them as pets, but I'm not going to fault someone for doing what makes a successful business. It's like having a pet pig and getting mad at people who butcher their pigs. But we all still eat bacon
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Kind of like fighting dogs, right?

    I eat meat...and my animals that I raise to butcher live happy, healthy lives as stress free as possible. Just because they're livestock destined for my freezer doesn't mean that they should receive any less consideration. They are LIVING beings, and are deserving of my respect as such. In fact, I treat them as well as, if not better than, the way I treat the animals that are my pets.

    If all you can see is dollar signs when you look at your young horse and will do whatever it takes to achieve those dollar signs, then maybe you should play the stock MARKET, and leave the living stock to those who can see beyond the instant gratification of getting to the pay window.
    Eolith, Clava, LynnF and 4 others like this.
         
        01-13-2013, 03:24 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    Just thought Id add that my meat animals live better than most people. That is my income and the food that feeds my family. If I treated them badly I would lose money and food. I completely 120% agree with Red Cedar Farm and am appalled people would risk their horses long term health for a short term goal.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        01-13-2013, 03:38 PM
      #30
    Yearling
    My old trainer started jumping her youngest at 2. He was cantering by 1 1/2 years. She started him at 10 months. I hated watching Rowdy put under that pressure ...
    And what I found was, the more she rode him, the worse he got. We had gone to a show in Oklahoma, so we were gone for a week, therefore Rowdy had a break. When we got back, and she rode him, he did great! She was quite proud of him, and 'took it easy' on him... Which was going through all gaits and riding for about half an hour. I was disgusted.
    The day after, she rode him again. He was worse, she rode him harder. This continued for the whole week. By the 5th or so day, he was bucking, and she was riding him for 1 1/2 hours+. How is this helping him? It's not! They just get frustrated, and put into pain because of it. It's ridiculously uneccasary, and I promise Rowdy likely won't be sound at 10 years of age. It's just sad.
         

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