The next step in training horses - question?
 
 

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The next step in training horses - question?

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    03-02-2011, 06:33 PM
  #1
Weanling
Question The next step in training horses - question?

Hey guys! Well, I am planning on bringing my boy home for the summer, which requires me to purchase an extra horse to keep him company. Despite the fact I can get a free pasture pal relatively easily, I am not a big fan of feeding a horse to just walk around the pasture. I also want to move up the "training ladder", so I have been thinking about getting a prospect / project horse to work on. I am by no means a beginner, I've been riding for 12 years, anyway here is my question-

Training wise, what type of horse should I look into? ( despite that fact that all horses are different, and there are exceptions to every rule) generally, in your experience, is it better for a 'first project horse' person to train an ex-racehorse; a younger, newly broke horse; or a rescue? What difficulties will each type of horse pose, and (generally) what types would be more suitable as an eventer prospect.

Hopefully this question doesn't have too many variables. But I'd like to hear any other thoughts on the situation!

Thanks!
     
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    03-02-2011, 07:01 PM
  #2
Weanling
I think you will get a lot of different opinions on this. If I were you, I would find a Tb to work with. Great for eventing, will give you everything they have and try their best for you which is ideal for training. It doesn't have to be straight off the track, you can find an older tb who has already been broken for English riding after racing but still needs to be worked with. From my experience, warmbloods have been more difficult to retrain compared to tbs. Will you have some help with this project horse? Always a good idea to enlist the help of an experienced trainer when you can. Good luck!
     
    03-02-2011, 08:45 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shasta1981    
Will you have some help with this project horse?
I will have 2 people actually, both my dressage & jumping trainer have experience in training horses, so I will be able to get advice from both perspectives. They both know each other ( my dressage trainer is also my jumping coach's dressage trainer) so I won't get too many conflicting views. =)
     
    03-02-2011, 09:32 PM
  #4
Banned
What would you want to do with the horse?
If your reason for a 2nd horse is as a companion, have you thought about a none horse companion like a goat or even a donkey?
     
    03-02-2011, 10:38 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexS    
What would you want to do with the horse?
If your reason for a 2nd horse is as a companion, have you thought about a none horse companion like a goat or even a donkey?
Needing a companion is the reason i'm in the market now - it's insanely easy to find a free pasture pal around here, but I am interested in furthering my training education, which I don't think a goat or donkey would fulfill lol
     
    03-02-2011, 11:03 PM
  #6
Banned
Makes sense, sounds like a good excuse for a 2nd horse to me :)
     
    03-02-2011, 11:06 PM
  #7
Showing
If I was looking, I would look for a green horse that had been well started. They don't need to really know a whole lot, but be solid in the basics like moving off pressure, and being soft and flexible to the bit. Past that, I don't think it really matters what kind you choose.
     
    03-03-2011, 12:23 AM
  #8
Weanling
My first project horse, and the horse that got me into training horses, was a real problem horse. The type of horse that wouldve been barely broken (sat on a few times) then sold to an intermediate/beginer rider with not much training experience, then learnt that rearing/bucking/bolting got people off, then left alone with her vices for several years.

She really tested my horsemanship, and I learnt more on how to softly yet effectively treat, read and communicate with horses from her than any person could ever teach.
     
    03-03-2011, 01:26 AM
  #9
Foal
I would look into rescuing a horse-the "donation" you make for the animal is usually fairly reasonable, plus it's a tax write off :) AND it helps a great cause...there are many breed specific rescues (OTTB is a HUGE one..) and you can usually find that perfect horse. Good luck!
     
    03-03-2011, 04:04 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustbemonroe    
I would look into rescuing a horse-the "donation" you make for the animal is usually fairly reasonable, plus it's a tax write off :) AND it helps a great cause...there are many breed specific rescues (OTTB is a HUGE one..) and you can usually find that perfect horse. Good luck!
Wow! Really? This information may encourage my parents to fund my horse adventures! I haven't looked into it too much, but I've only found 1 or 2 rescues around my area in Alberta, although they only have yearlings for sale/adoption.
     

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