No Brakes! - Page 4
 
 

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No Brakes!

This is a discussion on No Brakes! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        07-08-2013, 10:19 PM
      #31
    Trained
    I only watched a minute or so of the first video posted, so this is based on what I saw.

    Like Deserthorse said, braced legs and arms. When you brace for a stop you will get the same out of the horse. Relax, and drop your ribcage, LIFT your hand with a curb bit( if you still insist on using one) if you want to send a signal. Do not try to set the head by pulling the head down-it is counterproductive. Again like Deserthorse said lots of circles and stop on the bend, and instead of asking for the back up try reversing using the bend you stopped on. She will already be setup for it. On the bend it is harder for a horse to brace rather than going straight and asking for backing. Horses that have the habit of bracing get sticky there.
    If you rode cutting horses you should know that when cutting the rib and shoulder is lifted up away from your cowside leg. If not, he falls into the turn losing ground and time. So think of it that way. Stopping with a slight bend and switching directions.
         
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        07-09-2013, 01:36 AM
      #32
    Started
    I was working with that but she out smarted me lol. My bf would trot (and later on lope) the horses towards the fence and ask them to stop. Their options where ether to turn or stop. His horses have a dead stop. Tried it with her and she will refuse to stop and just turn. So I did that with turning her right after she stopped (like rolbacks). Worked for about two days and then she was done with it. Ill try it with just turning and see how that works. She was getting a better stop (walk only) when I was working with her on the trail (did not have a safe arena for a year) and she got it. Then I had to start over after we put back shoes on her because she has NO idea how to balance after that (and was no longer in pain. Had no idea she was in pain). As for the asking her to drop her head I don't pull, I gently ask. She for the longest time did not how how to give. Whenever you slightly pulled on the reins all she knew was to put her head up, I think the hack had a lot to do with that. (head up was not good for her back). So now that she has learned its ok to put her head down I have noticed she keeps her head lower than she used to, and will stop with her head down at a walk.
         
        07-09-2013, 02:07 AM
      #33
    Banned
    What im seeing is you pulling back and not giving the horse any relese at all.. when I ask a horse to stop I give a light jerk of the reins untill they come to a complete stop.. the constant pull makes them throw the head up and will cause them to start ignoring the bit and make them hard in the mouth-- I never give a constant pull unless im wanting a lateral flex (pulling their nose to mt knee)

    Id try giving light taps instead of full on pressure.. same for backing- don't hold the pressure on the bit like that just give the light taps.. I do this for turning too. Its more efficient and is very clear what you're asking of them.

    Start this with what she's familiar with (the sidepull) then once she gets what you want switch to the smooth snaffle and you can work your way into the bit you want to keep riding her in.
    rookie likes this.
         
        07-09-2013, 02:25 AM
      #34
    Started
    I don't have the side pull anymore. After she took me for one too many wild rides I gave it back to my friend (and after I was convinced she was going to have a permanent indent in her face). I can ride her in the mustang halter though. I have tried that in the past and she dose not like it. Ill try again though.
         
        07-09-2013, 09:27 AM
      #35
    Started
    I think toto has said it well. The thing that gets my boy to stop is relaxation of the rider and a squeeze on the reins followed by a release. Its the release that is more a stop cue than anything else.
         
        07-09-2013, 01:28 PM
      #36
    Super Moderator
    I am in agreemant with Deserthorsewoman. The braced manner of your riding has a great deal to do with the horse bracing up.

    If you have taken the hrose from an abused Charro situation and got her this far, you've done well. That's a lot of work.
    But the mare is still a very worried being, and the whole stopping worries her the most. It must have been something painful for her during her past training. Or, she was punished if she didn't stop fast enough , or ? But, she has a lot of anxiety about it.
    I also think that the saddle may very likely be causing her discomfort at the trot or canter, and the harder you ride into the cantle, the more it hurts. Its a really hard habit to break when you learn to ride with your knee braced. It's that bracing that makes you pogo up and down when she canters.

    I guess I am really just repeating what others have said, but basically it's get the horse comfortable and responding to the bit at the walk before doing a trot. That could be a LOT of walking, a LOT of small circles. Then when you go to trotting, if possible, let her trot out for awhile, wihtout stopping her. I mean let her cruise around the arena until she relaxs and drops her head on her own. She might trot the first 5 minutes all bunched up and tight, but just keep her going, figure eight, circles, whatever, not too tight, not much rein contact . Just let her go. When you're pretty sure she wants to stop, then kind of tell her she can and let her ease into the stop slowly on the loosest rein you can offer, and you DON"T brace you knee. You can "quit riding" without bracing. In fact, bracing is not quiting, it's actively doing something.
    deserthorsewoman likes this.
         
        07-09-2013, 03:26 PM
      #37
    Green Broke
    I watched the video until I could not stand anymore.. and I will watch the others later.

    First of all, that is the most boring ride I have ever seen and you probably don't see it! You put her in a trot and at the SAME PLACE you ask for the turn to the center and the stop. Then you pet her and back her up. Oh my.. she is a smart looking horse too. Then you changed direction and did the same thing the other way. All at the same pace. All the same number. YAWN!

    This, BTW, is a very human thing to do (stop at the same place.. rinse and repeat). Problem is the horse will get bored out of her skull. On top of that you sit on her like a block of wood.. braced and not light at all. She is a nice light horse.. you need to be as well.

    Meanwhile the horse travels with her nose poked up and her back hollow. She has no idea what you want and looks like her saddle does not fit well.. like she is in pain. This may be a saddle fit issue or it may be the wooden way you are riding.

    So.. here is what I would do. First of all, forget the trot and the lope for now. Just walk. Change direction.. complete 180 degrees.. every 1/4, or 1/3 or 1/2 or 3/4trs they way around that pen. Get her thinking you are crazy. Throw in some 90 degree turns toward the center of the arena.. then a 90 degree back to the rail. Just keep yourself light in the saddle.. weight in your heels not your butt.. and your hands light and easy on the reins. I would try her in a french snaffle. Again.. no trotting.. just walk.. keep turning.. keep asking for nice long strides.. build an active and engaged walk by actively engaging her mind.

    Keep control of her feet. If you ask for the halt and she doesn't halt, turn her. Turn her. Turn her. Ask for the halt. No halt? Turn turn.. keep the straight strides a different amount. Make her EARN everything. Keep her engaged. Keep her wondering what you are going to do next.

    If she breaks into a trot, turn her.. turn again.. turn again.. make it a lot of work.

    Keep her interested. No more boring. At all.

    You don't need caveletti at this point. She isn't ready. You aren't ready. Learn to sit her lightly and to be light with your hands. Get her forward and engaged at the walk.. not just dragging along.. get her interested and forward at that gait.. and very responsive.

    The trot will come later.

    You can do this. You have an athletic build.. and you have a nice horse.
    Stichy and 6gun Kid like this.
         
        07-09-2013, 05:57 PM
      #38
    Banned
    ^ I agree about the cavalettis.

    Id say the saddle aint fitting right by the way she draws her head up like she's in a panic at the trot- and I noticed its kind of pinched up like a 'V' in the back.. I think the bars are too big on her and its too long in the back.. its a bear trap saddle so I think its sinking you forward but holding you in an awkward position- from what I saw.

    I used to ride a 'crazy' arabian that didnt stop to good but when I used the light jerks on the reins it stopped the horse instead of them biting down and running through the bit anyway.. and come to find out that arabian wasnt so 'crazy' after all it was the way shed been trained.

    A sidepull is about like using a nylon halter to ride in so I agree- its not for her if you notice its digging into her face.. id start all over with a smooth snaffle bit- you can even use a mullen (straight bar) and see how she likes that.. if its the saddle throwing off your posture kick it to the curb!
         
        07-09-2013, 07:05 PM
      #39
    Foal
    You sound like your making excuses for your horse. She doesn't like to stop, she doesn't like the bit, she doesn't like this, that, etc. If you've ruled out pain, then it doesn't matter if she doesn't like it. That's her problem. I rode a mare once who could "only be ridden in a [special] rope halter" because she didn't like bits and she didn't like hackamores and it was all a bunch of bs...the mare was just throwing a fit because that got her what she wanted. I rode her in a snaffle anyway and she tossed her head and backed up and threw a fit about it and I just ignored all that and didn't release driving pressure with my legs until she moved forward. Eventually she was fine in a snaffle. That's just my experience but don't make excuses for her. She may just not like it because it's new and she doesn't understand something so instead of assuming it doesn't work, work her through it.
         
        07-09-2013, 07:28 PM
      #40
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mangomelon    
    You sound like your making excuses for your horse. She doesn't like to stop, she doesn't like the bit, she doesn't like this, that, etc. If you've ruled out pain, then it doesn't matter if she doesn't like it. That's her problem. I rode a mare once who could "only be ridden in a [special] rope halter" because she didn't like bits and she didn't like hackamores and it was all a bunch of bs...the mare was just throwing a fit because that got her what she wanted. I rode her in a snaffle anyway and she tossed her head and backed up and threw a fit about it and I just ignored all that and didn't release driving pressure with my legs until she moved forward. Eventually she was fine in a snaffle. That's just my experience but don't make excuses for her. She may just not like it because it's new and she doesn't understand something so instead of assuming it doesn't work, work her through it.
    Youve rode this (OPs) horse before?
         

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