No Clue What I Am Doing! Help??
 
 

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No Clue What I Am Doing! Help??

This is a discussion on No Clue What I Am Doing! Help?? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        08-01-2008, 02:42 AM
      #1
    Foal
    No Clue What I Am Doing! Help??

    To put this straight in October '07 I bought a 3 1/2 month old colt. He was my first ever horse, and now as I found out owning a horse is A LOT different then reading about them! (Not that I didn't know that before the purchase!)

    Anyway since I've had him, I've taught him to be OK with his ears being touched, okay with being brushed, he does really good with his hooves, and getting better by the day (I am still working on his feet a lot lately.) He is halter broke (he's getting umm not so good with this, but I am making him better with it) and he leads really good (no more running on the lead!)

    But right now I am at a stand still, seems he is learning and getting everything stated above down pack, I have no idea what to do next!

    I know that I need to get him used to having his mouth touched, and having his entire body touched, and getting some light weight on his back. And I was told that I should be lunging him and starting ground work, he is bored, and he is in a pasture, but there is no round pen or separate place to work with him, its just a pasture.

    What should I be teaching him? And how can I do it when all I have access too is his pasture? Anyone have any good links on training or any tips for me?? He's a year old, and the only horse on the property.


    Oh please do not mind his hooves in this picture. It was taken when I got back from a months trip and his hooves needed to be done. They were taken care of about 2 weeks ago (the same day I got back from being away!)

    Sorry for rambling and thanks in advance.
         
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        08-01-2008, 07:17 AM
      #2
    Banned
    You can do ground work.

    Use a longer than normal lead shank and a moderate length whip and start to get him to move his hind quarters over with the front staying in one spot. Do this both sides. Get him to move his front end over while the hind quarters remain in one location, again both sides. Get hin to move over front and back like a leg yield except you are using the whip ( just keep tapping him until he does move) in place of the leg.

    You can get him used to being saddled by using a blanket. Some people will bridle them at this age, again to get them used to the equipment.

    From the picture this horse needs a farrier RIGHT AWAY. The front feet are way way too long. That back are not good either.
         
        08-01-2008, 09:07 AM
      #3
    Showing
    We've only had 3 babys born on our place so I am in no way an expert, but I highly recommend Clinton Andersons Handling Foals, Weanlings and Yearlings. I've pretty much used his methods on all 3. The first one I sold to some folks with young kids who tell me they can walk up to her in a pasture, jump on her bare back and ride her with a lead rope and halter. I find great pleasure in working with young horses. Its so rewarding to see them progress to hopefully fine riding horses. Its the saddling up and jumping on their back that bothers me. I know they are all well trained enough to not have too much of a fit. The older I get the harder the ground is though so I leave the first ride to someone else
    Work with babys should be limited to no more the 10-15 min at a time if anyone tells you different there full of it.
         
        08-01-2008, 09:18 AM
      #4
    Yearling
    Ground work is find for foals. Be careful - he's developing and is not ready for hard work. No lunging, no round penning no circling, it's hard on the joints. Teach him to load in the trailer! It's easier when they're little.
         
        08-01-2008, 12:05 PM
      #5
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spyder
    You can do ground work.

    Use a longer than normal lead shank and a moderate length whip and start to get him to move his hind quarters over with the front staying in one spot. Do this both sides. Get him to move his front end over while the hind quarters remain in one location, again both sides. Get hin to move over front and back like a leg yield except you are using the whip ( just keep tapping him until he does move) in place of the leg.

    You can get him used to being saddled by using a blanket. Some people will bridle them at this age, again to get them used to the equipment.

    From the picture this horse needs a farrier RIGHT AWAY. The front feet are way way too long. That back are not good either.
    Okay I will defiantly try that!

    I didn't know that bridling them at this age was something you could do! I will defiantly look into doing that to him.

    His hooves have been taken care of, here they are the day the farrier came out!!!

         
        08-01-2008, 12:07 PM
      #6
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Vidaloco
    We've only had 3 babys born on our place so I am in no way an expert, but I highly recommend Clinton Andersons Handling Foals, Weanlings and Yearlings. I've pretty much used his methods on all 3. The first one I sold to some folks with young kids who tell me they can walk up to her in a pasture, jump on her bare back and ride her with a lead rope and halter. I find great pleasure in working with young horses. Its so rewarding to see them progress to hopefully fine riding horses. Its the saddling up and jumping on their back that bothers me. I know they are all well trained enough to not have too much of a fit. The older I get the harder the ground is though so I leave the first ride to someone else
    Work with babys should be limited to no more the 10-15 min at a time if anyone tells you different there full of it.
    Thats a book right? Because if so I will go out and try to buy it!

    I want to be able to have him bareback trained as well as saddle trained.. one day.

    So working with him 10-15 minutes at a time, how long of a break should he have before continuing. I was going to start going out to see him LONGER like 2 hours a day.
         
        08-01-2008, 12:09 PM
      #7
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by palogal
    Ground work is find for foals. Be careful - he's developing and is not ready for hard work. No lunging, no round penning no circling, it's hard on the joints. Teach him to load in the trailer! It's easier when they're little.
    Oh okay!!!! So the lunging and stuff like that comes when he is older? Like 2-3 years old or older?

    I don't own my own trailer yet! I've been trying to find one that I can purchase. Last time he was loaded into one was in April/May and he was a little difficult, so I know that's something I have to work on. I've actually been reading a lot on the proper way to get him in when he resists ect. With any luck I will be able to get a trailer in the next few weeks!
         
        08-01-2008, 12:29 PM
      #8
    Showing
    Keep reinforcing the basics, but let him be a horse! Youngsters learn more from being in a herd of horses than you can teach him, as far as body language and respect go.

    Other than that, make sure you can touch him all over. Play with his ears, neck, body, belly, legs, etc etc.
    You can try some leading exercises, like working around an obstacle course of "scary" stuff, like walking over/under a tarp, around cones, over poles, etc. Desensitizing him to this stuff now will pay off big when you're working him under saddle and he doesn't freak out over the wind blowing from a different direction.

    Keep him up to date on all vaccines, farrier work and deworming - that is something, as a buyer, I always look at.
         
        08-01-2008, 03:19 PM
      #9
    Yearling
    Do you have a trainer in your area that could come out and spend a few hours with you and your guy. They could give you some hands on pointers.

    Question? Why would you want to start with a baby if the only experience you have is out of books?

    It may just be the angle he's at, but he looks a bit wormy or hay belly.
         
        08-01-2008, 03:24 PM
      #10
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
    Keep reinforcing the basics, but let him be a horse! Youngsters learn more from being in a herd of horses than you can teach him, as far as body language and respect go.

    Other than that, make sure you can touch him all over. Play with his ears, neck, body, belly, legs, etc etc.
    You can try some leading exercises, like working around an obstacle course of "scary" stuff, like walking over/under a tarp, around cones, over poles, etc. Desensitizing him to this stuff now will pay off big when you're working him under saddle and he doesn't freak out over the wind blowing from a different direction.

    Keep him up to date on all vaccines, farrier work and deworming - that is something, as a buyer, I always look at.
    Okay sounds good, I will try to get him more customed to things that might scare him in the future!

    I've been good at keeping his shots, deworming and farrier care up to date.
         

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