No Really.. that thing someone said about there being no problem horses is true
 
 

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No Really.. that thing someone said about there being no problem horses is true

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  • "there are no problem horses, only problem riders" quote
  • mental issues horse forum

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    08-19-2011, 01:30 PM
  #1
Weanling
No Really.. that thing someone said about there being no problem horses is true

Everyone must have heard this quote before:

There are no problem horses, only problem riders.

If I'm not mistaken it comes from a book somewhere. Anyways, so I've been thinking about this quote a lot recently as I've recently been teaching my horse to free jump on the lunge line.

Now he'll easily jump anything shorter than his knees, but when it comes to the taller jumps (about 2 feet) I find myself really having to get after him and drive him forward. Okay, not a big deal... but there were several times when he would get right up to it and just stop dead.

And I would growl, mutter, and then circle him around and approach the jump again. Now I noticed that he would jump it about 1/3 times. And when he jumped it he was beautiful... I mean his form sucked, but I was exstatic and I could tell he was proud of himself too.

So I stepped back and I wondered what on earth was going on as he still dug in his heels sometimes. I could even tell when it would happen.

And I was even more baffled by the fact that when I rode him he would jump it easily and with no qualms at all.

What was happening??

So I got a friend to video tape me... and then I saw what was happening and I admit I felt horrible for grumbling all those nasty things at my poor horse, who was doing exactly what I asked of him.

You see I've taught my horse when lunging that the hand I hold out away from my body is that one that drives him forward. When I switch hands he is to reverse directions... and when both hands come up he is to stop.

I looked at the video, and to my horror I saw my hand holding the lunge line to lift up as he approached the jump. I did so to give him extra rein to get over the jump with, but unconciously I was also telling my way-too-smart TB that he should stop.

*headdesk*

The next time I asked him to jump, I kept my hand down and just moved with him, and he jumped beautifully (in his awkward way) again and again.

So it really is true... no problem horses... only problem lungers.

***
Moral of this story, if your horse isn't doing what you ask when you ask, take a step back. Look at yourself. Ask yourself what you did just there. Video it. Take pictures.

I'll bet a bag of carrots that you'll see some cue that you didn't realize you gave (or sometimes a space for a cue you should have gave)

Then you can readjust yourself and try again... and I'll bet double or nothing that you'll find yourself on the road to improving again.


Argh!! Look at me!! LMAO
     
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    08-19-2011, 01:46 PM
  #2
Weanling
Very true. I have never encountered a problem with my two horses that wasn't actually my fault. Sometimes it sucks to be so incompetent, but at least I am able to change. Imagine how much our lives would suck if it were the horses' faults...nobody would ever be riding
     
    08-19-2011, 02:37 PM
  #3
Doe
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerchiesKisses    
Everyone must have heard this quote before:

There are no problem horses, only problem riders.

If I'm not mistaken it comes from a book somewhere. Anyways, so I've been thinking about this quote a lot recently as I've recently been teaching my horse to free jump on the lunge line.

Now he'll easily jump anything shorter than his knees, but when it comes to the taller jumps (about 2 feet) I find myself really having to get after him and drive him forward. Okay, not a big deal... but there were several times when he would get right up to it and just stop dead.

And I would growl, mutter, and then circle him around and approach the jump again. Now I noticed that he would jump it about 1/3 times. And when he jumped it he was beautiful... I mean his form sucked, but I was exstatic and I could tell he was proud of himself too.

So I stepped back and I wondered what on earth was going on as he still dug in his heels sometimes. I could even tell when it would happen.

And I was even more baffled by the fact that when I rode him he would jump it easily and with no qualms at all.

What was happening??

So I got a friend to video tape me... and then I saw what was happening and I admit I felt horrible for grumbling all those nasty things at my poor horse, who was doing exactly what I asked of him.

You see I've taught my horse when lunging that the hand I hold out away from my body is that one that drives him forward. When I switch hands he is to reverse directions... and when both hands come up he is to stop.

I looked at the video, and to my horror I saw my hand holding the lunge line to lift up as he approached the jump. I did so to give him extra rein to get over the jump with, but unconciously I was also telling my way-too-smart TB that he should stop.

*headdesk*

The next time I asked him to jump, I kept my hand down and just moved with him, and he jumped beautifully (in his awkward way) again and again.

So it really is true... no problem horses... only problem lungers.

***
Moral of this story, if your horse isn't doing what you ask when you ask, take a step back. Look at yourself. Ask yourself what you did just there. Video it. Take pictures.

I'll bet a bag of carrots that you'll see some cue that you didn't realize you gave (or sometimes a space for a cue you should have gave)

Then you can readjust yourself and try again... and I'll bet double or nothing that you'll find yourself on the road to improving .
Great story, well said !!
     
    08-19-2011, 02:50 PM
  #4
Foal
Great story!
     
    08-19-2011, 04:03 PM
  #5
Weanling
Props for taking the time to really investigate the issue! Thumbs up!

I heard a quote once that I just love:

Riding is like nuts and bolts. If the rider is nuts, the horse bolts.
     
    08-19-2011, 04:06 PM
  #6
Foal
Great story! :) I absolutely agree with this statement ! ;) I heard comparison that horses are like computers: they do everything we ask them, but not what we want from them.
It's great that you were able to see your influence on horse, some people just don't see or don't want to see their fault.
     
    08-19-2011, 06:45 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerchiesKisses    
Everyone must have heard this quote before:

There are no problem horses, only problem riders.


I looked at the video, and to my horror I saw my hand holding the lunge line to lift up as he approached the jump. I did so to give him extra rein to get over the jump with, but unconciously I was also telling my way-too-smart TB that he should stop.

*headdesk*

***
Moral of this story, if your horse isn't doing what you ask when you ask, take a step back. Look at yourself. Ask yourself what you did just there. Video it. Take pictures.

I'll bet a bag of carrots that you'll see some cue that you didn't realize you gave (or sometimes a space for a cue you should have gave)

Then you can readjust yourself and try again... and I'll bet double or nothing that you'll find yourself on the road to improving again.


Argh!! Look at me!! LMAO
I love this story...I am looking inward myself now as I realize the horse is truly reflecting back to me. Brilliant for you to spot the problem and have the willingness to see it.
     
    08-19-2011, 07:15 PM
  #8
Weanling
So true! If your horse isn't answering your question. You're either asking the question wrong or asking the wrong question! I often step back and readjust myself and realize it's all my fault.. Great post!
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    08-19-2011, 11:38 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerchiesKisses    
There are no problem horses, only problem riders.
Actually there are problem horses out there. Some are taught/allowed to be like that so they develop all kinds of problems even a good trainer is refusing to deal with, some just have that kind of mind (should I say "mental issues"?).
     
    08-20-2011, 04:25 AM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
Actually there are problem horses out there. Some are taught/allowed to be like that
who does the teaching/allowing?
     

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