Not standing on crossties/Dislikes grooming?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Not standing on crossties/Dislikes grooming?

This is a discussion on Not standing on crossties/Dislikes grooming? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse gets aggressive when being groomed tb
  • Horse standing in crossties

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-18-2010, 12:48 AM
  #1
Foal
Not standing on crossties/Dislikes grooming?

My 4 y/o tb had little experience in the crossties when I bought him. He wasn't ever at the track; raised as a pet. He's used to getting his own way about everything. He has the attention span of a gnat; he knows how to stand tied, and he's good for the first couple of minutes, but after that he spends half of his time dancing sideways, pawing, or tossing his head.

I discourage him when he does these things, but I feel like he doesn't enjoy grooming at all, and it makes me want to rush through it just so that he doesn't go insane.
The only time he stops is when I stop to scratch his withers; he loves that.

Should I be doing anything to make him stand better, and make it a more enjoyable experience?

I've tried taking things slower, but then it seems like his behaviour just escalates. He gets really bored, and then starts doing things like chewing on everything nearby, and digging at the ground.

I don't think its because he's afraid; he isn't generally a fearful horse and he never shows any signs of fear. Overall he's really pushy, we're basically redoing all of his ground manners before we get him back under saddle.

Just noticed that the title should say 'in' the crossties... I'm so clever :p
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-18-2010, 02:43 AM
  #2
Foal
Anyone? :)
     
    03-18-2010, 08:45 AM
  #3
Banned
I deal with young puks alot. They too will not stand quietly for grooming in cross ties. I have a simple solution. When the horse starts moving around I just step right up against him and knee him in the rib cage and yell STAND UP. It doesn't take long before he learns to stand quietly. I see people waving a riding crop in the horses face threatening but that doesn't work. A quick knee, not a kick and knee does far more.
Within the week the horse is standing quietly without moving.
Trying to reason, trying to make it more enjoyable is not the way to go.. they are in cross ties they need to stand quietly and any other behavior is not tolerated.
Be soft, cuddle them and they walk all over you.
Be fair, be firm, set guide lines and the horse will be happier.
     
    03-18-2010, 08:51 AM
  #4
Banned
I know I am going on and on but once more.
I start alot of young unhandled guys and from the minute I get them I start treating them as finished horses. If they don't tie, I tie them immediately, I strip away all the bad behavor and only leave the good. I won't back down from a fight if they choose to start one. From the minute they are cross tied they are expected to stand quietly and any other behavoir meats with discipline.
Now after all this discipline the end up more attached to me then the other's that wave crops in their horses face or put up with less then perfect behavior.
It doesn't drive them away, just the opposite. They respect a strong leader,a fair leader but not one they can walk all over.
Be quiet,easy going until they misbehave and then clamp down quickly and harshly and then forget it.
     
    03-18-2010, 09:54 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Rio... KNEEING THE HORSE IN THE RIB CAGE??!?! There's never any reason to ever do that! Everrr! Just because they don't stand on cross ties doesnt give you the green light to go kicking them around. No wonder they wont move there afraid of getting hurt... dear god!

My advice... I was dealing with a horse like this for a friend. He was moving on cross ties because he was afraid of human touch after being treated horrible. So if he moved forward I was step him back into place where he was then pet/scratch him in his favorite spot then continued. If he stepped back i'd move him forward back to his spots. I made that one spot the relaxation place.. the happy place.

Little would never paw he would grind his teeth which is a displaced behavior, caused by stress, so in order to stop it.. I had to interupt it. So I would push his head or back him up SOMETHING to interupt that pattern. So maybe try it with the pawing? I've never had a pawer so Im just throwing in what I would try. But now that horse will stand for hours for grooming. If he does feel like theres something he sees his needs to move for I just need to raise my hand to shoulder/chest level and he will stop in his tracks and go to where he needs to be.

PLEASE don't 'knee' the horse in the ribs.
     
    03-18-2010, 10:16 AM
  #6
Started
Honestly, I would ignore the dancing and moving (within reason, if the horse starts being truly aggressive, or something like that I'd find a pro trainer to help). The issues is simple -- he wants to move, you want him to stand still. When he moves, stay with him and keep on brushing like nothing is happening, gently but firmly, with rhythm (wear tough shoes so you don't have to worry about getting stepped on). When he stops dancing, pawing, whatever, count to three Mississippi seconds, stop brushing, praise him (maybe treat him or scratch his withers ), and then go back to brushing while he's standing still. If he starts fussing again, just keep brushing until he stands, count to three, praise...

Eventually (pretty quickly, actually, unless the behavior is terribly ingrained), the horse starts to understand that the quickest way to end the brushing is to stand still and allow it. Brushing will not stop because he chooses to dance around in the cross-ties. Timing is crucial to a quick result. As you work on his ground manners and he begins to see you as the "herd boss", I expect that your crosstie issues will get better as well.

Additionally, be sure that you have some kind of safety ties; whether quick release snaps, Blocker rings, or ol' reliable quick release knots securing your cross ties to the wall. ANY horse can spook, and horse tied up and spooking can be a major wreck darn fast. Safety ties are always a good idea. *Climbs down off soapbox*
     
    03-18-2010, 10:17 AM
  #7
Banned
You think that my knee in the rib cage comes anywhere close to another horse kicking him??? I see the guys playing rough all the time, rearing and coming down on each other all the time with iron shod hooves..
     
    03-18-2010, 10:35 AM
  #8
Banned
[QUOTE=Scoutrider;579687] The issues is simple -- he wants to move, you want him to stand still. When he moves, stay with him and keep on brushing like nothing is happening, gently but firmly, with rhythm (wear tough shoes so you don't have to worry about getting stepped on). When he stops dancing, pawing, whatever, count to three Mississippi seconds, stop brushing, praise him (maybe treat him or scratch his withers ),

This reminds me of allot of people I have seen over the past 25 years.. People who don't have a clue and never get a horse that truely behaves. They constantly put up with things. 20 years down the road they are dealing with the same crap.
Clamp down right from the get go. A horse praised into doing something is never as reliable as the horse that met a little discipline.
In a week using the knee you will be further ahead then a lifetime of praising. I still ride with 2 older ladies with older horses and they are still putting up with crap while my new 4 year old stand quietly no matter what.
Play a game if you want , horses are not reasoned with, they are led by a strong leader.
     
    03-18-2010, 10:48 AM
  #9
mls
Trained
I don't think booting a horse in the belly is going to teach patience. Scratch that - I KNOW it won't.

The horse is young, mentally maturing. He needs consistent handling - not force. Now if he was being naughty or dangerous - then yes - get after him. There is a line and the handler needs to know the difference.

Patience comes with time and maturing.

We stand our young horses in the cross ties and let them be while we start chores. Dumping grain, setting hay, bedding stalls, etc. We can keep an eye on them and they learn fussing isn't going to get them anywhere.
     
    03-18-2010, 10:55 AM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosDad    
this reminds me of allot of people I have seen over the past 25 years.. People who don't have a clue and never get a horse that truely behaves. They constantly put up with things. 20 years down the road they are dealing with the same crap.
Clamp down right from the get go. A horse praised into doing something is never as reliable as the horse that met a little discipline.
In a week using the knee you will be further ahead then a lifetime of praising. I still ride with 2 older ladies with older horses and they are still putting up with crap while my new 4 year old stand quietly no matter what.
Play a game if you want , horses are not reasoned with, they are led by a strong leader.
I assure you, Rio, that I do not tolerate "crap" from my horses. They will behave, or there will be consequences. The consequences are befitting of the action that the horse took. My current horse, Scout, come to me with not a clue about crossties (only ever been single tied) and danced much as the OP is describing. Within three days of "reasoning" he stood like he'd been born crosstied, and has not challenged my request that he stand quietly since. This is fact, not boast.

As you often point out, we women lack a level of strength, a fact that I will not dispute. Perhaps I have a death wish for clinging to my snaffle bits and groundwork, but such tactics work for me with great success. If I start a physical battle with the horse I darn well better know that one knee or smack will do the job, because if it doesn't and the horse ups the antie past what I can dish back, I'm in trouble. I choose to use my brain. The most recent articles that I've read show that the horse has roughly the intelligence of a 2-3 year old human. I've never met a toddler I couldn't outsmart; and if the research overestimates equine intelligence so much the better for me. My horses are disciplined, and I am frequently complimented on how well mannered they are. They stand like stones to be tied, they stand like stones to be mounted/dismounted, they do not buck, rear, bolt. My farrier comments that he enjoys working on my guys because they are so quiet and prepared for the visit. I'm not asking that you take my word for any of this, we do not know each other beyond a few posts on a forum and you have no reason to believe a word I type. I defer to your obviously superior experience and years of training horses on most matters, but I do ask that you do not assume that because I do things a little differently than you that my horses are ill-mannered or disrespectful, or that I "don't have a clue". Thank you.
     

Tags
bored, crossties, green, training

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tex Tan saddle like or dislikes? FriesianSH Western Riding 8 03-28-2013 04:43 PM
CrossTies Nita Horse Training 86 11-15-2009 02:59 PM
Breed Likes and Dislikes Current Displeasure Horse Talk 10 07-24-2009 12:05 AM
Outdoor crossties? goldilockz Horse Grooming 7 07-21-2009 08:00 PM
Saddle bags -- likes and dislikes NorthernMama Horse Tack and Equipment 10 08-18-2008 03:10 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0