Novice riders and green horses
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Novice riders and green horses

This is a discussion on Novice riders and green horses within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Is it a bad idea as a novices rider to but a just broken horse
  • Green rider and green horse

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-20-2010, 06:54 PM
  #1
Yearling
Novice riders and green horses

Let me begin by saying that I know this question is impossible to answer accurately as you can't see my riding or the horse involved. What I'm asking for are general guidelines that I could use to give me an idea of when the horse's owner and I could discuss me riding her.

I am a novice; I've been learning to ride for three summers. I can walk, trot, canter and leg yield, but I'm rusty. I do not have a very strong or stable lower leg yet, but my hands are soft. I still have some trouble with bouncing in the canter due to losing all my riding muscles over the past eight months, but when I get it I have a reasonably light seat. I do not yet have much individual control over each of my limbs and cannot control each leg of the horse separately and so on.

Megan is a five or six year old cob/thoroughbred (I'm not sure on her exact age, but she's young). She was broken at four, and soon after had a foal. That foal is now a yearling, and Megan is being brought back into work.

My friend Amy is a good and experienced rider, and the horse's owner has basically been putting Amy on her back for her first rides. Megan is learning quickly, and is much more focused on the road than she is in the field, where every little thing is a distraction. She's becoming much better at listening to leg, and is unused to contact (she has a very sharp halt!) but Amy is slowly introducing it and she's responding well. Right now the focus is on getting her to listen to the rider and concentrate on the task at hand, as she has the basics for stop, go and steering. Amy's only done work in walk and trot so far, no cantering, as Megan's still a little unpredictable in what she will find scary or distracting. When she's startled, she weaves about a bit rather than bolting.

The original plan was for me to help bring Megan back into work, but I felt my skills weren't nearly up to the level required and after discussion and observation it was decided to give the task to Amy. However, we would like me to be able to ride her too in time.

What I'm wondering is if you experienced riders and trainers out there have an idea of some milestones Megan should be reaching before someone like me can ride her very briefly (ten minutes max), in a safe, controlled environment. We feel that I could get on her now, but I'm choosing not to as I don't want to disrupt these important formative lessons. What kind of things do you think a horse should be capable of before someone like myself can ride her without having detrimental effects?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-20-2010, 07:20 PM
  #2
Trained
Here's a great math equation to describe the situation:

Green + Green = Black + Blue

Green horse and a green rider means someone is going to get hurt. A green rider is always detrimental to any horse, you need to be riding something that will tolerate you so you can learn. Once you have the core strength, individual limb control and "feel" of the horse (ie knowing what they are going to do before they do it) would I then say that you could ride a slightly younger horse.
When the horse is over 8 or 9 years old, has been everywhere and done anything and even then only under supervision and instruction, would I say it would be OK for you to ride the horse, at your current level, and not get injured (I say this with 90% certainty).
You should find an entirely different horse and wait a few years for this one to get some experience under her belt. A small, easily sitable spook for this Amy girl could potentially unseat you very quickly if you were at all tense.

Good luck!
     
    05-20-2010, 07:34 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
Here's a great math equation to describe the situation:

Green + Green = Black + Blue

Green horse and a green rider means someone is going to get hurt. A green rider is always detrimental to any horse, you need to be riding something that will tolerate you so you can learn. Once you have the core strength, individual limb control and "feel" of the horse (ie knowing what they are going to do before they do it) would I then say that you could ride a slightly younger horse.
When the horse is over 8 or 9 years old, has been everywhere and done anything and even then only under supervision and instruction, would I say it would be OK for you to ride the horse, at your current level, and not get injured (I say this with 90% certainty).
You should find an entirely different horse and wait a few years for this one to get some experience under her belt. A small, easily sitable spook for this Amy girl could potentially unseat you very quickly if you were at all tense.

Good luck!
I agree with this also. If you aren't up to the task of handling anything this horse can give you then one fall from you may scare the horse and make training much harder. Once she has a good base where she is comfortable going pretty much anywhere or doing most anything then you could try doing some walk work with her in a safe place. It may take anywhere from 3mths to 3yrs before she is ready for a novice rider.

I would also suggest getting yourself up to a point where you are comfortable doing anything on a horse. Once you can sit spooks of different sevarities then you will be able to ride this horse.
     
    05-20-2010, 11:48 PM
  #4
Foal
Congradulations on how you think! The word you seek is confidence. If the horse is confident and so are you the both can learn together. Its the glue that keeps things together.

Be sure to stay with how you think and use the word in that way.

Remember the goal is for her to give you control of her feet. That has to be earned.
     
    05-21-2010, 05:29 AM
  #5
Yearling
Thanks everyone. I figured the advice would be 'don't', and none of us want to do anything that will damage Megan's training (or hurt me!) so I fully understand why I shouldn't ride her. I just wondered if there was something I didn't know that might give me an opportunity to ride her instead of just working with her on the ground.

Just so you guys know, the horse I'm currently riding is fully schooled and broken, excellent manners, can handle experienced and complete and utter novice riders, and is teaching me a lot.
     
    05-21-2010, 05:52 AM
  #6
Weanling
Lol ok i'm a rusty noivice rider to lol and i'm terrified of thourobreds even when I could completly control horses hehe n.n' so if its young AND a thourobred I mean if you think you can handle it but it takes nerves and lots o experience
     
    05-23-2010, 03:26 AM
  #7
Trained
Sure you could hop on her and just have a walk around, maybe to cool her down for your experienced friend. However I wouldn't be getting on and having a proper ride if you haven't established a 'fee' yet. Say if you put your leg on, she's just learnt that leg means forward, and she jumps forward, you'll lose your balance and whack her in the mouth accidentally. Little things like that can really undermine a horse's training, particularly one that is so green. Once they have a negative experience it is very hard to re-establish what you already had and the horse may shy off an aid for some time before it's confidence is re-gained.

With an unstable lower leg, you will be sending her mixed messages and 'dulling' her reactions. She needs someone who can ride very quietly, still hands and legs, so that any aids she is given are intended to get a response. Rather than having your legs on and off on her sides continuously.

Hope some of that made sense, I have a terrible hangover and probably shouldn't be on the computer haha!
     
    05-23-2010, 05:25 AM
  #8
Yearling
Thanks Kayty :) I know I am definitely not skilled enough to give her a proper ride yet. I am not a teacher, I am the one being taught. My friend has been worried that I feel she may have 'usurped' me as she's come in and is being given all this responsibility, but my ego isn't that fragile xD I know I am a novice, I am learning much more basic things than she is, and our responsibilities and privileges match out abilities.

For now, I'll stick to working with Megan on the ground. Whilst it seems like I might be able to hop on her back for a couple of minutes with a loose rein and no leg, I don't want to be responsible for any mishaps that make it harder to bring Megan back into work or muddle her training.
     
    05-23-2010, 07:42 AM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by claireauriga    
Let me begin by saying that I know this question is impossible to answer accurately as you can't see my riding or the horse involved. What I'm asking for are general guidelines that I could use to give me an idea of when the horse's owner and I could discuss me riding her.

The original plan was for me to help bring Megan back into work, but I felt my skills weren't nearly up to the level required and after discussion and observation it was decided to give the task to Amy. However, we would like me to be able to ride her too in time.
I believe you already have the answer...discuss and plan with the trainer and instructor.

Folks always talk about green on green not being a good match, but remember that not all experienced riders are 'good' riders, and a good, seasoned horse can be ruined by a bad, 'experienced' rider, too.
     
    05-23-2010, 08:15 AM
  #10
Foal
I have to say I agree with the theory that it's dangerous in a sense, however I do believe that sometimes (depending on both the individual horse and rider) the duo can learn together. In a controlled environment it gives the rider the opportunity to use the small cache of skills they posses to guide the horse. I strongly believe trying to teach Mean anything should be left to a more experienced rider but the reinforcement of basics can be covered without much fuss.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I didn't even know horses could have green eyes!!!? Piaffe Horse Breeding 10 04-07-2010 11:07 PM
Why Green Riders and Green Horses DON'T Work. ChingazMyBoy Horse Training 16 04-05-2010 09:07 AM
Do the riders and horses that you know match? matzki Horse Riding 20 03-25-2010 08:15 PM
PBS show on Horses and their riders on tonight ridesapaintedpony Horse Talk 1 08-16-2009 01:23 PM
Wanted: Calm well trained horses and their riders ivyschex Horse Shows 0 03-07-2008 04:23 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0