Oh dear, I need help. - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 43 Old 07-25-2008, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Harlee rides horses
I am asking for it correctly and she always picks it up correctly on corners. But I want her to pick it up correctly on straight aways because we don't always get lucky enough to be on a corner when it is asked of us.

Brandon-Circles actually make her speed up.

What I do is,
-I cue with my outside leg.
-Kiss and ask for a lope.
-If I'm doing a circle I turn her head in the direction of the circle, but if I'm not then I turn her head to the rail to get her shoulder out front.

I need the softening exercises to lower her head mlkarel2010...
I will gladly try anything whether or not it's time consuming because eventually we'll have to learn it.

Today I took off my spurs because I gave her a bump on her side, and when I rode without the spurs she did MUCH, much better.


Any tips would be wonderful!!?
...I'm curious if you arent' giving her heel w/out realizing it? If taking the spurs off helped, I wonder if you aren't accidentally spurring her?

I think you are on the right track, you just need to find your patients which of course, is harder then gettign the right lead!!! Are you pulling her up while you are loping?
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post #12 of 43 Old 07-25-2008, 08:42 PM
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I had one doing this this morning. The horse needs to rock back on her haunches and steady her gait. So what we did was canter a few strides - halt - back 4-5 steps-jog and canter again. I had my student do this about 5 times and the horse slowed down considerably. They get too fast when they pull too much with the front and try to coast with the rear. So, with this series of steps we put him back in 4 x 4
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post #13 of 43 Old 07-25-2008, 09:46 PM
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I really like what mayfieldk said about slowing a lope down, and asking for the leads. Here's a slight variation, though, that helped my horses quite a bit, but your horse has to know how to turn on the forehand and hindend very solidly. When loping, especially when refining, I want the hind end in some (varies between horses), that shoulder up (I suspect yours is dropping since she speeds up on circles), and the head straight. If my horse starts to speed up, I force them into a stop with a counter-bended turn on the hind end. So if I'm loping left, I pick up my left rein, bringing it towards my shoulder and forcing that shoulder over to the right. I might use a little left leg, but it's almost all rein. Ideally, this lasts for 180 turn, but if needed to get that shoulder up and moving away to the right, it might be for a longer period. But that shoulder needs to lead the turn to the right, with the head and neck staying bent slightly to the left. Once I get that shoulder moving over, I keep the front 1/2 of the body in the same position, but switch to using my right leg to move those hips over to the left, getting them off of my leg. Once they are off my leg, I ask them to lope off staying in that same position (doesn't matter what direction they lope off in - correct lead, counter canter, just lope off without trot strides). Hip left, shoulder up. I let them go a couple of strides in a good rhythm, then slowly release them and let them hold themselves in that position. If they lose the position or speed, I repeat the above sequence.

Another thing I really love doing is counter-cantering, building up to large amounts of time. If done correctly, it will help keep the shoulders up, and the horse moving off of your leg. Just make sure that the horse is driving from behind, and keeping a good strong rhythm and impulsion. It also really helps create the muscle strength to hold a lope for WP.

If any of this confuses you, let me know and I'll try to explain it another way.
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post #14 of 43 Old 07-26-2008, 03:39 AM
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slump down and lean slightly backwards. We practice this at horse ridng and some horses go slower or stop altogether. Try practicing this at a walk with no reins. Also, if that doesn't work, slightly pull back on the riens, then give her head, then slightly pul;l, then give her her head. Etc.

Good luck!

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post #15 of 43 Old 07-26-2008, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachluvshorses4eva
slump down and lean slightly backwards. We practice this at horse ridng and some horses go slower or stop altogether. Try practicing this at a walk with no reins. Also, if that doesn't work, slightly pull back on the riens, then give her head, then slightly pul;l, then give her her head. Etc.

Good luck!
The problem with that though is that her mare is still young and not an expert at rating her speed depending on how Harlee moves her body and if Harlee does this it'll pretty much just set her off rythm with Lizzy and then it'll look like she is bouncing, which isn't what she wants in a WP show. I've also found that checking your reins doesn't work that great on energetic/young/ or green broke horses.

Just my experience because I've tried both of those before....
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post #16 of 43 Old 07-26-2008, 09:42 PM
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Not only that, but slumping forwards is not the correct way to ride; it places your weight on the horses forehand. How can they lift it if that's where your weight it? It is also not pretty to watch.
Ride in the 'classical' seat, shoulders, hip, heel.
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post #17 of 43 Old 07-27-2008, 04:49 PM Thread Starter
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mayfieldk thanks a lot, I'll try all of that today, but I'm not quite understanding what haunches in is in particular...

Farmpony, when exactly do you think I may be spurring her? Because I'm not quite understanding where you're coming from on that...

Sandsarita...When do I do that circle? Whenever? Like to slow her down? And then when she drops her inside shoulder, I pick up my outside rein so that she straightens out?

Sorry for misunderstanding, this is so much to comprehend... :roll:

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post #18 of 43 Old 07-27-2008, 05:19 PM
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Haha, training can be a challenge sometimes.

Haunches in is when the horse is going down the rail and swings it's butt into the inside. The back feet are on a seperate 'track' from the front feet. The front feet stay straight, the head is a little tucked to the inside. It's hard for a horse to do, so if you teach it, don't push so hard in the beginning.

Cues are: Slight inside rein to curl her head to the inside (so you can see the eyelash!). Slight outside rein, to keep her from turning and to support the shoulders. Then take your outside leg and ask for the butt to move into the arena! Ta-dah, haunches in. :) It is a FABULOUS way for a horse to build muscle.

Good luck!
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post #19 of 43 Old 07-27-2008, 06:16 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks!
Do you have any way to teach headset as well?

"Doing what you like is freedom, liking what you do is happiness."
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post #20 of 43 Old 07-27-2008, 06:41 PM
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In the picture on your avatar, she looks like she has a pretty good headset. Does it get higher the faster you go?

http://i131.photobucket.com/albums/p...orum/thing.png

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