Oh dear, I need help. - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Oh dear, I need help.

This is a discussion on Oh dear, I need help. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        07-27-2008, 08:29 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Harlee rides horses
    sandsarita...When do I do that circle? Whenever? Like to slow her down? And then when she drops her inside shoulder, I pick up my outside rein so that she straightens out?

    Sorry for misunderstanding, this is so much to comprehend... :roll:
    I do the circle whenever she gets out of sorts. Either strung out behind, too fast, dropping the shoulder, just not keeping her body together. And remember - it's a turn on the hind end to pick the inside shoulder up (turning away from the lead), then holding the shoulder in place and driving the hindend around the forehand then loping out in that position.

    When she drops her inside shoulder, I pick up on the inside rein and do an indirect rein - so bring that inside rein towards your outside hip. Then use your outside leg to move the hip to the inside. Together, those should help pick up her shoulder. Remember - when they drop their shoulder, they are leaning in the direction of travel. So you want to block that direction, and find an easy way to for them to stay balanced. Usually this is a gentle bend in the dirction of travel.

    Let me know if you have any more questions. I wish I had a video to show you what I mean since it's hard to explain, but I just don't have a way to make one right now. Best of luck!
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        07-27-2008, 09:34 PM
      #22
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amightytarzan5
    In the picture on your avatar, she looks like she has a pretty good headset. Does it get higher the faster you go?

    She does once she relaxes, but whenever we transition into a faster gait she throws it up.


    Sandsarita-I think I got it, thanks a bunch.

    Also,
    Is there any tips you all may have that I can use to get Lizzy to transition into the lope quicker? What she does is she sometimes will pick it up automatically and then other times she goes into an extremely fast extended trot and then throws her head. Any ways to keep her head down and transition fast?
         
        07-31-2008, 11:15 PM
      #23
    Started
    Anyone?
         
        07-31-2008, 11:31 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Transitions work. Don't let her run into it, as soon as she runs, steady back to normal trot then ask again
         
        08-01-2008, 02:48 AM
      #25
    Yearling
    Headset:

    You said you're having trouble keeping her headset during transitions, which most people do. When green horses go from walk-to-trot, trot-to-canter, or walk-to-canter, they will throw their head up. You can't really punish a horse for this, because the reason why they do it, is because they are lifting their head, neck, and forehand to push with their hindquarters. Once the horse builds muscle in their back, then they will be able to go through transitions with a smooth headset. With that being said, don't look for a change over night (or over a week or two). It takes at least three weeks to build solid muscle, and although you can get a horse to perform a walk-to-trot without tossing it's head in one week, it will not be CORRECT.

    With that being said, start at walk to trot, obviously. With two hands, pick up your reins and establish contact. You can keep your hands low and wide (called 'funneling') to help her place her head low and keep it their. If you put contact on the reins and she doesn't give at the poll, DEFINITELY work on that first!
    When she gives at the poll, she is calm, and her neck is level (you can start this with a higher, more 'dressage' head carriage to make it easier on her), ask for her to jog/trot. KEEP the contact in your 'funneling' position. Don't let her speed her walk up into the jog--if she does, stop her, back her up, and try again (and just like last time, don't punish her! Just show her that was not the right answer, lol). As she makes the transition into her jog, if her head comes up, tighten your hold until she stops and DON'T let go until she gives her head (breaks at the poll). Once she does, release pressure and immediately try again. Ask her to walk, 'funnel' with the reins, and ask for the jog. When she moves into the jog and listens to your rein cue that is telling her to keep her head down, release slowly as you let her move into the gait. Once she does this consistently, you just wean her off of the funneling hand position until you can just pick up the reins with one hand, and cue.
    The same goes from jog-to-lope. Take a hold of her face, and when she gives, put her in the position to lope and kiss. If she tries to hurry into a trot, IMMEDIATELY stop and back her. Again, not a punishment, just a "wrong answer!". Do not let your horse get sloppy with this! Then go and ask her to lope again from a jog. If she does nothing, give her a little extra outside leg to 'pop' her into a lope. If she canters, don't reprimand her and just let her move out for a few strides so she knows she did the right thing. Then again--back to the jog.
    It is harder to teach the jog-to-lope and walk-to-lope because your hands need to follow her head as she moves, because you have contact with her mouth. You'll get to the point where as soon as you know she's set in the gait and not going to move her head, you can release your rein pressure.
    Also do it in this order-- walk-to-jog, jog-to-lope, walk-to-lope. Don't move on to the next one until you have gotten a hold of the first one, and try not to drill her so bad so she can use and build the correct muscles.
    Downward transitions are pretty much the same; 'funnel' with your hands. It's an interesting feeling, but as your coming from a lope-to-jog, you need to follow her mouth and 'guide' it to stay long and low. It is not a tug-of-war or steady, unrelenting hands--you need to have very good hands to be able to teach this!

    Anything else?
         
        08-01-2008, 02:58 AM
      #26
    Yearling
    Oh, and other thing for the lope transition just to make it a little better for you:

    Ask her to lope from walk/jog/whatever. When she goes to speed up, like mentioned, stop and back her. She needs to know that the extended trot was not what you asked for.
    Go back to walk/jog/whatever. If she does nothing (or 'debates' your cue to canter), give her a smart tap with your spur that means, GO NOW! You don't have to kill her, just make her react. Don't WORRY if she explodes or go too fast, just give her a pat for loping/cantering, which was what you asked. Give her a little breather, then try it again.
    After you kiss for your lope, she has a second to respond. NO MORE. If you're counting to two, three, four or five from the time you give the cue to the time she actually does the manuever, it is too much time! You'll notice that after just one or two smart taps with the spur, and she'll transition into the lope in a SNAP.
    If she starts making the transition into a jog-to-canter (and not a jog-to-lope, lol), then just gently take your reins and hold her a little as she makes the transition. Now you are showing her that although you want her to transition quickly, that doesn't mean SHE has to go quickly.
         
        08-01-2008, 04:48 PM
      #27
    Started
    That makes sense, thank you.


    She doesn't have problems at all with slowing down like jog-walk lope-walk/jog/halt. Just going into the lope is the only problem she automatically picks up the jog and walk its just getting her to not extended trot into the lope. And when she does pick it up, her head is so incredibly high because she's trying to focus on working off her hind quarters that she's not paying attention to her headset..
    Oh well, I'm probably expecting too much in such little time.

    Thanks for everything..
         
        08-01-2008, 05:10 PM
      #28
    Yearling
    No problem! Just be consistent with her and patient, and she'll perform for you when she gets the muscle. Good luck!
         
        08-01-2008, 10:27 PM
      #29
    Started
    New problem.

    Lizzy gets really really touchy with the spurs but they are the only way I can get her to get into the lope faster. Like, she starts anticipating the lope whenever I use them and she acts like I'm beating her senseless when all I do is apply pressure until she lopes, I never kick her..

    Any suggestions? :roll:
         
        08-02-2008, 12:27 AM
      #30
    Yearling
    A lot of horses do get touchy with the spurs. Wean YOURSELF off of them!

    When you ask her to lope, ask her to move her haunches in, but just use your calf, not your spur. Keep her in this position (she may anticipate a lope out of this position... don't let her go!) UNTIL she calms down. Once she relaxes, then kiss and have her lope off. Don't apply ANY different leg/spur pressure. The cue is the kiss, not the spur!
    When she DOESN'T go, then use as little as spur as necessary. You want your cues to be with your legs, not your spurs. Some horses get really spur-nasty where they swish and pin their ears whenever you use them... so it's better to use them ONLY when needed (to fix something) and not for the initial cue.

    Make sense?
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:49 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0