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Old-School Horse Training Approach

This is a discussion on Old-School Horse Training Approach within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Old School Horse Training
  • Approaches to horse training

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    01-01-2013, 07:04 PM
  #21
Yearling
I'd be interested in the video.

That said, your original post was a little bit unfair. "All you see on this forum....?" How much of the forum have you read? Read through the training threads and I think you'll see a variety of approaches. Also, most answers to training queries will be presented to people who are trying to get some minimal degree of control over their horse and not be killed by it. Hence, very few posts discuss the training of a high-level animal; they're trying to communicate the absolute basics to handlers who don't have a clue how horses function.
     
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    01-01-2013, 07:12 PM
  #22
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesilverspear    
I'd be interested in the video.

That said, your original post was a little bit unfair. "All you see on this forum....?" How much of the forum have you read? Read through the training threads and I think you'll see a variety of approaches. Also, most answers to training queries will be presented to people who are trying to get some minimal degree of control over their horse and not be killed by it. Hence, very few posts discuss the training of a high-level animal; they're trying to communicate the absolute basics to handlers who don't have a clue how horses function.
My apologies for seeming unfair. What I was meaning is that you see is this forum has an entire sub-category on NH. I do understand what you are saying entirely, but I have yet to see any old schooling approaches in horse training posted in this forum. And judging from posts, many don't know what the art of making a bridle horse is. Everyone has different takes on training horses and I respect them all, but I would like to share a dying art form in this forum.
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    01-01-2013, 08:57 PM
  #23
Trained
We did discuss this before
Bridle Horses

Im sure there are more, but this was the freshest in my mind
     
    01-01-2013, 10:36 PM
  #24
Banned
Absolutely! I'd love to have a bridle horse....and be able to ride it correctly! Please do show us!! I've seen a lot of stuff, what bothers me more than somene being a little tough on a horse....is someone who coddles and let's a horse get away with too much!

Thank you!!!
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    01-01-2013, 11:15 PM
  #25
Green Broke
Subbing -I would follow a thread on vaquero riding.
     
    01-01-2013, 11:18 PM
  #26
Yearling
Ok!! I will begin ground training tomorrow, (weather permitting). Thanks everyone for your interest and open minds! :)
     
    01-01-2013, 11:45 PM
  #27
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanstrom Horses    
Ok!! I will begin ground training tomorrow, (weather permitting). Thanks everyone for your interest and open minds! :)
Wanstrom my mind is so open you can see what little grey matter I have!!! LOL
ONE DAY I'd like to try training my own bridle horse......
In fact....here's the first question......could an already broke horse (reining) be retrained to be a bridle horse? Providing conformation is correct....and correct me if I'm wrong, but in a perfect world the set of the horses neck into the shoulder, high or low, can affect its ability to be trained for bridle?
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    01-02-2013, 12:06 AM
  #28
Trained
Great question, Muppet
So, what would we look for, conformation-wise, in a horse to be the "ideal" bridle horse?
     
    01-02-2013, 12:21 AM
  #29
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
Wanstrom my mind is so open you can see what little grey matter I have!!! LOL
ONE DAY I'd like to try training my own bridle horse......
In fact....here's the first question......could an already broke horse (reining) be retrained to be a bridle horse? Providing conformation is correct....and correct me if I'm wrong, but in a perfect world the set of the horses neck into the shoulder, high or low, can affect its ability to be trained for bridle?
Well, in my experiences, horses that are already trained can sometimes be easier to make a bridle horse than a young colt. Given they will already be set in their ways some, but most anything is possible. I recently bought a 9 year old buckskin mare, trained for nine years in Parelli methods. She came up for sale at a fatanstic price so I thought I would give the whole retraining thing a shot. It took a lot of time just to get the mare to relax, air out and be a horse again. The mare was previously ridden in a long shank snaffle. I then moved her into a correction bit, then into a two rein with a half-breed mouthpiece. Granted I had to adjust my program. I never use correction bits on my bridle horses I start from the ground, but in this mare's case that is what I needed to do. I then worked from a two rein and she is now push-button and straight up in a spade bit. It took a good four months to get her to that point though. The biggest challenge with retraining a horse to be a bridle horse is to figure out where you need to pick up and start the bridle-making process. If the horse has been ridden in a snaffle it's entire life, then picking up at the hackamore stage would probably be best, or for instance a horse can be ridden in a ported bit, then you could probably pick up at the two rein stage. What type of bit is your horse in at the moment that you are looking to retrain?
As far as your other question goes, horses with higher neck sets just tend to carry their heads higher, which in the bridle horse world, that's fine I have a roan mare and her neck ties in very high into her shoulder, she just carries the bridle in her own way. She flexes at the poll nicely, but carries her head higher than most horses, but she is one of my most favorite horses to ride, just the slightest touch of the rein on her neck and she will move her whole body.
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    01-02-2013, 12:26 AM
  #30
Banned
Thanks for that!
My horse works in a correction bit, recommended that he shows (have yet to show him) in a cathedral bit. I've ridden him in the cathedral bit, he's very very light and 'up' in it.....finger tip control almost.. I pop the cathedral on him about once a month....gives me a gauge to how he feels compared to the month before

Ack.....sorry about all the smiley happy oh so cheerful faces!
     

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