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Old-School Horse Training Approach

This is a discussion on Old-School Horse Training Approach within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Old school western horse training
  • Old school horse breaking

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    02-09-2013, 11:58 PM
  #671
Foal
Just read the whole thread.....very interesting :) subbing....
     
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    03-21-2013, 12:26 AM
  #672
Yearling
Hey Wanstrom, haven't seen or heard you around much lately hope everything is going ok. Hope to hear from you soon!
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    03-21-2013, 10:50 AM
  #673
Weanling
Havent read all the thread, but grew up in a vaquero tradition (and show the top western eq horses in the country). It was progressive from hackamore (or muesero/no serrated serrate) to snaffle to spade. The horses were very much like working equitation horses, collected/ready to move and cut. They were upright/in front of the vertical rather than low necks and 'breaking at the poll' (the poll is the occipital lobe...so a horse does not flex there. They should lift and arc their neck and have a shortened base of support, not flex in the front part of their neck which straightens the hind legs).

It is a methodical tradition, and by the time the horse is in a spade/curb they should be a whisper of neck rein (certainly NEVER two hands on it). NO excessive bending of the neck (from the withers to head) which is often shown by NH. That excessive bending (especially low and closed) puts great pain on the bars, and is a clumsy excuse for control only. It controls the mind through pain and merely poses the horse (in what has become an acceptable western pleasure outline with the neck lower than withers).

Interestingly enough this 'old school approach' is also one which follows from france's dressage heritage. Caveson to snaffle to full bridle (or curb alone). What it does take is knowledge about the figures ridden, preserving the gaits of the horse, and perfected equitation and timing (not the chair seats of many of the pix here). Mho.
     
    03-21-2013, 09:28 PM
  #674
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by equitate    
Havent read all the thread, but grew up in a vaquero tradition (and show the top western eq horses in the country). It was progressive from hackamore (or muesero/no serrated serrate) to snaffle to spade. The horses were very much like working equitation horses, collected/ready to move and cut. They were upright/in front of the vertical rather than low necks and 'breaking at the poll'(the poll is the occipital lobe...so a horse does not flex there. They should lift and arc their neck and have a shortened base of support, not flex in the front part of their neck which straightens the hind legs).

It is a methodical tradition, and by the time the horse is in a spade/curb they should be a whisper of neck rein (certainly NEVER two hands on it). NO excessive bending of the neck (from the withers to head) which is often shown by NH. That excessive bending (especially low and closed) puts great pain on the bars, and is a clumsy excuse for control only. It controls the mind through pain and merely poses the horse (in what has become an acceptable western pleasure outline with the neck lower than withers).

Interestingly enough this 'old school approach' is also one which follows from france's dressage heritage. Caveson to snaffle to full bridle (or curb alone). What it does take is knowledge about the figures ridden, preserving the gaits of the horse, and perfected equitation and timing (not the chair seats of many of the pix here). Mho.
I also think that because of the gaining popularity of this style of riding with it has came the "comeback" of the older style ranch horses and Spanish breeds as opposed to using showpen bred Quarter horses.
The conformation of the older style ranch horses fit what you describe for the body position needed and used much better than the QH that lope with their nose between their knees. With a horse that has a his head betweeen his legs there is more preparation involved for him to get to the next maneuver losing time and wasting energy to get the same job done as the horse who is upright and lifted.
     

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