Old-School Horse Training: The Snaffle Horse - Page 5
 
 

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Old-School Horse Training: The Snaffle Horse

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  • Women bending under horse pictures
  • The steps of progression with bitting a ranch horse

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    01-25-2013, 02:34 AM
  #41
Trained
I do a heap of walk through spins. Getting correct bend and then just going round step by step just off seat, a lifted inside rein and the outside leg blocking the hip.

I also find doing a rollback then pushing them forward out of it, al least a lope, helps them set back as they need that butt under them to power out, and most of them find it fun so they get motivated.
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    01-25-2013, 10:48 AM
  #42
Weanling
Thanks everyone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
I do a heap of walk through spins. Getting correct bend and then just going round step by step just off seat, a lifted inside rein and the outside leg blocking the hip.
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Okay, quick question about this. I use my outside leg to move the shoulder. Am I doing something wrong, or are we talking about different moves? Or do you block the hip so the horse doesn't kick it out?
     
    01-25-2013, 06:55 PM
  #43
Yearling
I have a question about bits. What are your thoughts on the differences of the action of a bit that has the chains attached to the bit so they can swivel under the shanks as opposed to bits that have the chains attached to the bit so they are hanging from the back of the shanks? So the fist picture compared to the second picture. (if the pics don’t work let me know Ill try to repost them.
     
    01-25-2013, 06:56 PM
  #44
Yearling
     
    01-26-2013, 01:00 AM
  #45
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
I find this all really interesting. I campdraft, which I suppose is similar to the cow section of working cowhorse.

Campdrafting is done, on the whole, in snaffle bits. From the greenies right up to the open horses. I honestly can't even imagine doing a draft in a curb bit with a draped rein.

I wonder if the training of our draft horses is not as good as it could be because of the lack of progression in bitting. Or wether the use of a spade bit wouldn't be compatable with drafting.

I have always wanted to train a horse to a curb bit and/or a bosal, but I am always worried it will compromise their performance in a snaffle, which is what we have to use for competition.
I don't think there is any difference in the quality of training, regardless of bit progression. It's just a different style of training. From the videos I've seen of campdrafting (would love to see it live someday or even compete...I may just show up at your door someday LOL), there is quite a lot of rein/bit involvement and much of it is done on contact; therefore, the use of the snaffle bit.

Given training for both rider and horse on how to use and understand a curb bit properly, it would be the same result, just with less contact; i/e a draped rein.

Wanstrom, it is so nice to have you here! For a long time, it was basically just me and W_S (who I quoted above) who shared the same basic training philosophies and experiences with the cattle and ranch type work, then along came Cowchick, and now you're here. It is really nice to meet other women who share my ideas and ideals regarding horses and their training .
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    01-26-2013, 04:49 AM
  #46
Trained
LisaG, it depends on the horse. I mostly move the shoulders with my reins and back up with leg if I need to. So to start a rollback/spin, I set back in my seat, open my rein, look over that shoulder, and my outside leg/spur sits around the back end of the rib age to hold that hip in. If she is sluggish with her front end I will bring my leg forward and roll my spur up behind the girth to quicken up her front. Her biggest problem is coming to forward to early out of the turn, so we do a fair bit of backing into the turn, which is where dropping the hip out becomes more of a problem. When I'm in the camp and she is thinking forward and focused on the cow, then my spur will be more toward the shoulder pushing for that speedy depart.
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    01-26-2013, 04:50 AM
  #47
Trained
I actually went and looked up the rules for our campdraft organization. Turns out you can actually use any bit or bit less you like as long as the horse has free use of the head, ie no rings or head checks.
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    01-26-2013, 01:11 PM
  #48
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnrewPL    
I have a question about bits. What are your thoughts on the differences of the action of a bit that has the chains attached to the bit so they can swivel under the shanks as opposed to bits that have the chains attached to the bit so they are hanging from the back of the shanks? So the fist picture compared to the second picture. (if the pics donít work let me know Ill try to repost them.
Good question Andrew, all of ours have the swivel buttons like your second picture.
     
    01-26-2013, 01:15 PM
  #49
Yearling
I have bits with both. I don't really see too much difference, although, the shanks in on with chains tend to have just a touch more movement. But it is so slight, it doesn't make much difference. I have both, I like th chains just for looks. But as far a functionality it doesn't matter, IMO. Thanks Smrobs!! :)
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    01-28-2013, 08:12 PM
  #50
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
LisaG, it depends on the horse. I mostly move the shoulders with my reins and back up with leg if I need to. So to start a rollback/spin, I set back in my seat, open my rein, look over that shoulder, and my outside leg/spur sits around the back end of the rib age to hold that hip in. If she is sluggish with her front end I will bring my leg forward and roll my spur up behind the girth to quicken up her front. Her biggest problem is coming to forward to early out of the turn, so we do a fair bit of backing into the turn, which is where dropping the hip out becomes more of a problem. When I'm in the camp and she is thinking forward and focused on the cow, then my spur will be more toward the shoulder pushing for that speedy depart.
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Okay, thanks. I'm not the most refined rider sometimes, and I really need to think about what I'm doing. And this mare moves so fast, I'm sometimes not sure about my form, etc...

It would be great to have a ranch horse subforum on here. I wonder if there are enough people to justify that.
     

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