Once again more trouble with SIL yearling filly
 
 

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Once again more trouble with SIL yearling filly

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    06-19-2012, 01:38 PM
  #1
Yearling
Angry Once again more trouble with SIL yearling filly

My sister in law's filly is once again giving us trouble. We did finally get her over her jealousy fits, and we're now into the I will not lead in a halter fits. She is now about 18 months old. And she can be the sweetest little filly you'd ever want to meet, until you halter her. Then she rears, kicks, shoulders into you, paws and tries to run away until she jerks her head around because you still have the rope. We worked with her everyday to get her over her jealousy, but now since the whole herd has been moved into a new pasture its like she forgot all of her training. She is so herd bound its not funny, and it seems to be nearly impossible to break her of it. She's already ran through the fence because her mother was taken out for some light work (i caught her about 15min later in my yard). I'm at my wits end here now. I'm seriously considering selling her to someone who is more experienced and willing to work with her. I really don't want to risk mine or my SIL life fighting with her. Even though we've had her since she was born here on our farm. I just don't know what to do anymore.
She used to be such a perfect little angel, you could lead her anywhere, and now I don't know what happened.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Words of wisdom are nice too..
Thanks
     
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    06-19-2012, 01:54 PM
  #2
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizabeth Bowers    
My sister in law's filly is once again giving us trouble. We did finally get her over her jealousy fits, and we're now into the I will not lead in a halter fits. She is now about 18 months old. And she can be the sweetest little filly you'd ever want to meet, until you halter her. Then she rears, kicks, shoulders into you, paws and tries to run away until she jerks her head around because you still have the rope. We worked with her everyday to get her over her jealousy, but now since the whole herd has been moved into a new pasture its like she forgot all of her training. She is so herd bound its not funny, and it seems to be nearly impossible to break her of it. She's already ran through the fence because her mother was taken out for some light work (i caught her about 15min later in my yard). I'm at my wits end here now. I'm seriously considering selling her to someone who is more experienced and willing to work with her. I really don't want to risk mine or my SIL life fighting with her. Even though we've had her since she was born here on our farm. I just don't know what to do anymore.
She used to be such a perfect little angel, you could lead her anywhere, and now I don't know what happened.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Words of wisdom are nice too..
Thanks
In my opinion, yearlings are a pain in the butt. They remind me of teenagers in the human world. They test test test the boundaries. They have a lot of energy and a lot of spunk, and they don't yet know all of the things a more mature horse does.

That's why when they are foals, I try to prepare them for this stage of life, because the more you prepare for the yearling stage, the less of a pain in the butt they are.

So I will ask you this. What is your experience with yearlings? Ever trained on before? How confident are you that you can get her back to where she needs to be? What has already been done with this filly?

And btw, not to sound harsh, but just because she is sweet some of the time means nothing. If she feels like being sweet, she will be, but when she decides she's done being sweet, she becomes a monster. Just because she's putting up with you does not mean she is trained. Looks can be deceiving. A well trained horse does not do things as you described, they behave all (if not a vast majority) of the time, whether they want to or not.

In my humble opinion, yearlings are the hardest stage to train. They are the most time consuming, have shorter attention spans, have a lot of energy, and take a lot of steps forward, mixed with a lot of steps backwards. However, this age can be the most rewarding come the 2 or 3 year old years, when the training truly pays off as they are introduced to saddle.

Honestly this all depends on what you believe you can handle. She is going to need consistent, straight to the point, no bull crap handling. And expect to spend a lot of time with her on a single issue. Once you start with her, you need to end on a good note, getting your point across no matter how long it takes. At this stage in her life, it is vital that she learn good things. She needs to be taught RIGHT NOW that this behavior is unacceptable, as she is only going to get bigger and stronger with age.
     
    06-19-2012, 02:02 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Quote:
She is going to need consistent, straight to the point, no bull crap handling. And expect to spend a lot of time with her on a single issue. Once you start with her, you need to end on a good note
I agree. Just like a teenager you need to consistently enforce rules. She is trying to figure out where her boundaries are and it sounds like you may not be consistently enforcing rules. Yes needs to mean yes and no, no, in all circumstances, everytime.
     
    06-19-2012, 04:11 PM
  #4
Yearling
The first question (IMO) would be are you willing to put the time, effort, and sweat into working this filly? Depending on the answer is where I would go. No? Sell her yesterday. Yes? Start her yesterday.
     
    06-19-2012, 05:27 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Young fillies are the wooooorst haha. I know some of the mares/fillies I've worked with are just so buddy sour and so herb bound they would make it impossible to work with.

Have you thought of supplements maybe? We used to give the really bad ones Moody Mare or Mare Magic. But you can't just depend on supplements. You just need to have patience.

It sounds almost like she's just trying to test you and see what shell get away with. Just keep reiterationg and reenforcing all her training. Eventually shell get it.

Instead of doing long training sessions trying to pound something into her brain, do one or two 15 min sessions (found that 15 minutes is like the max attention span for them ;P) and give her a break. She's a youngin so shell have lots of energy. And that's what she's using to fight you so turn it to something different. Lunging is good for bonding, and working on voice commands, plus itll work some of the energy out.

Work on things like ground poles and desensitizing to keep her mind occupied so she has less time to think about acting up
     
    06-19-2012, 05:44 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
so buddy sour and so herb bound they would make it impossible to work with.
More often than not this is the result of not building enough trust/respect, either being too rough or not having enough boundaries.

Out of the dozens of horses I've owned or worked with I have never had a horse(weanling, yearling or otherwise) stay herd bound.

Quote:
lunging is good for bonding
Bonding it may be good for, but young joints it is not. I would never do any amount of lunging with a yearling.

I agree with the poster that said if you were up for the work, keep her, if not, let her go.
     
    06-19-2012, 05:51 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Quote:
More often than not this is the result of not building enough trust/respect, either being too rough or not having enough boundaries.

Out of the dozens of horses I've owned or worked with I have never had a horse(weanling, yearling or otherwise) stay herd bound.
i was talking about the mares that were brought to us so we could fix that problem. Not so much the young horses.




Quote:
Bonding it may be good for, but young joints it is not. I would never do any amount of lunging with a yearling.
and again. I wasnt talking about young horses I was talking about any horse with bad ground manners and no boundries. Im not talking 20 straight minutes of loping her in circles im talking get her on a line and work on ur commands for her to walk. Stop. Back. Etc. any kind of non stressful non harmful ground work that will take her mind off everything else and get it onbehaving and listening to your instructions
     
    06-19-2012, 06:07 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Horse has figured out you don't know what you are doing. And horses don't have "jealousy issues" either. Not sure what horse was doing there, but it is not for jealousy. It is dominance pure and simple.

Every time you attempt something with her and she gets by with something? You are making it worse for the next time.

Honestly, you need to sell this one. Take some lessons from good horsepeople, and then find an older well trained horse, after you have gotten it out of your system to try and analyze what the horse is doing and wanting to be buddies.

If you approach horses, ANY horses as wanting to be friends, and assigning human emotions to them, without first establishing you are the leader, they will almost all act just as this one is. It is a rare horse that won't take over if let to do so.

This horse will keep on with this, until you are having reconstructive surgery, or possible waking up dead. It has gone on too long now. This horse should have had a HCTJM the FIRST time she acted up.
     
    06-19-2012, 09:15 PM
  #9
Trained
I definitely vote for selling her. You may feel obligated to keep her because she was born there, but it's honestly just NOT worth it when it comes to safety. Sell her, or give her away to someone that has the time and consistency to put into her.

My feeling is, at 18 months, she should already have all her ducks lined up in a row, manners in place and be a willing partner. If she doesn't, I feel that falls back on the owner for not putting enough effort into training at a young age.

Yes, some horses are just difficult. But that just means you have to buck it up and put more time and effort into their training. If you can't, you need to be responsible and find someone that can before someone gets seriously hurt and the filly gets ruined.

They just get bigger and heavier as they age. If they don't have manners at a young age, they won't have them as a mature adult. It only gets worse.
     
    06-19-2012, 09:33 PM
  #10
Trained
Sure horses have jealousy issues, however, not when you are handling them, they are supposed to listen to you, don't matter what issue they have, the issue is what you are telling them to do. That is a trained horse, how well trained is up to you.
     

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