Once again more trouble with SIL yearling filly - Page 2
   

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Once again more trouble with SIL yearling filly

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  • Having trouble with yearling
  • How to intimidate my sil

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    06-19-2012, 09:02 PM
  #11
Weanling
It sounds like you are over your head. I'd sell her if you are having doubts, but you need to get her attitude fixed if you plan on moving her quickly.

My suggestion is to find a professional to send her to to prepare her for a sale.
     
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    06-20-2012, 03:37 PM
  #12
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakotababii    
In my opinion, yearlings are a pain in the butt. They remind me of teenagers in the human world. They test test test the boundaries. They have a lot of energy and a lot of spunk, and they don't yet know all of the things a more mature horse does.

That's why when they are foals, I try to prepare them for this stage of life, because the more you prepare for the yearling stage, the less of a pain in the butt they are.

So I will ask you this. What is your experience with yearlings? Ever trained on before? How confident are you that you can get her back to where she needs to be? What has already been done with this filly?

And btw, not to sound harsh, but just because she is sweet some of the time means nothing. If she feels like being sweet, she will be, but when she decides she's done being sweet, she becomes a monster. Just because she's putting up with you does not mean she is trained. Looks can be deceiving. A well trained horse does not do things as you described, they behave all (if not a vast majority) of the time, whether they want to or not.

In my humble opinion, yearlings are the hardest stage to train. They are the most time consuming, have shorter attention spans, have a lot of energy, and take a lot of steps forward, mixed with a lot of steps backwards. However, this age can be the most rewarding come the 2 or 3 year old years, when the training truly pays off as they are introduced to saddle.

Honestly this all depends on what you believe you can handle. She is going to need consistent, straight to the point, no bull crap handling. And expect to spend a lot of time with her on a single issue. Once you start with her, you need to end on a good note, getting your point across no matter how long it takes. At this stage in her life, it is vital that she learn good things. She needs to be taught RIGHT NOW that this behavior is unacceptable, as she is only going to get bigger and stronger with age.
I worked with her and her half brother everyday for alteast an hour at a time for each. Until my mare had a hoof injury and had to be separated and constantly kept up with. Since then I haven't been able to get her back on the schedule we had. Her half brother is totally different, and a total opposite. She is my sister in laws filly, and she's more worried about other things and I think it may be best if we just get rid of her to a good home, where she'll become something other than just a pet. I would love to keep up with her, but I have 4 of my own that I need to work on as well. I'm kind of torn.
     
    06-20-2012, 03:38 PM
  #13
Yearling
Unhappy

Quote:
Originally Posted by spurstop    
It sounds like you are over your head. I'd sell her if you are having doubts, but you need to get her attitude fixed if you plan on moving her quickly.

My suggestion is to find a professional to send her to to prepare her for a sale.
I think i'm beginning to agree with you.
     
    06-20-2012, 03:42 PM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueSpark    
I agree. Just like a teenager you need to consistently enforce rules. She is trying to figure out where her boundaries are and it sounds like you may not be consistently enforcing rules. Yes needs to mean yes and no, no, in all circumstances, everytime.
Everytime I enforce the rules, she comes at me, and I do the best I can to keep her from kicking me in the face or running me over. Its as if she learned nothing the first year of her life.
     
    06-20-2012, 03:51 PM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Palomine    
Horse has figured out you don't know what you are doing. And horses don't have "jealousy issues" either. Not sure what horse was doing there, but it is not for jealousy. It is dominance pure and simple.

Every time you attempt something with her and she gets by with something? You are making it worse for the next time.

Honestly, you need to sell this one. Take some lessons from good horsepeople, and then find an older well trained horse, after you have gotten it out of your system to try and analyze what the horse is doing and wanting to be buddies.

If you approach horses, ANY horses as wanting to be friends, and assigning human emotions to them, without first establishing you are the leader, they will almost all act just as this one is. It is a rare horse that won't take over if let to do so.

This horse will keep on with this, until you are having reconstructive surgery, or possible waking up dead. It has gone on too long now. This horse should have had a HCTJM the FIRST time she acted up.
Yes horses do have jealousy, my moms mare hated me because I was born, I rode her once by myself, and she threw me and dislocated my arm. And even before that she would shoulder into me, charge me in her stall when I went to feed her, kick at me. That horse just hated me. She was nice to my brother though and my mom of course.
So it wasn't jealousy when my SIL went out and just spent time with the momma and baby got mad and reared at her and kicked her??? I'll just agree to disagree...
     
    06-20-2012, 03:59 PM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
I definitely vote for selling her. You may feel obligated to keep her because she was born there, but it's honestly just NOT worth it when it comes to safety. Sell her, or give her away to someone that has the time and consistency to put into her.

My feeling is, at 18 months, she should already have all her ducks lined up in a row, manners in place and be a willing partner. If she doesn't, I feel that falls back on the owner for not putting enough effort into training at a young age.

Yes, some horses are just difficult. But that just means you have to buck it up and put more time and effort into their training. If you can't, you need to be responsible and find someone that can before someone gets seriously hurt and the filly gets ruined.

They just get bigger and heavier as they age. If they don't have manners at a young age, they won't have them as a mature adult. It only gets worse.
I know, I worked with her everyday until my mare got injured, and now its like she learned nothing in her first year and some months. I just don't understand what happened or went wrong. She was doing well, and now its like she knows nothing. Her owner didn't even do anything when it came to training her, she just sees her as a pet, and to say that she owns them. We had hour long lessons, some grooming and manner enforcement. And now its like she learned nothing. I was working with her on the side of training/exercising my 4 horses. And now I don't think I can keep up with her demands. I think she's going to be better off in a new home, its getting to be too much for me.
     
    06-20-2012, 04:02 PM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizabeth Bowers    
I worked with her and her half brother everyday for alteast an hour at a time for each. Until my mare had a hoof injury and had to be separated and constantly kept up with. Since then I haven't been able to get her back on the schedule we had. Her half brother is totally different, and a total opposite. She is my sister in laws filly, and she's more worried about other things and I think it may be best if we just get rid of her to a good home, where she'll become something other than just a pet. I would love to keep up with her, but I have 4 of my own that I need to work on as well. I'm kind of torn.
*i have never worked with a yearling until now. I don't have much experience with anything younger than 2. Though our yearling that my husband got is turning out very well, couldn't ask for a more willing partner. And believe it or not I worked with him from the ground up too.
     
    06-20-2012, 06:45 PM
  #18
Foal
Just a tip if you do sell her. I would not use any word or combination of words like "get rid of her" or "I need her gone". When I see someone using that kind of language, I am completely turned off and would likely not go see their horse.

The connotation of getting rid of something is that it is defective or bad or worse. While she has behavior issues, an experienced horse person could likely turn her around in less than a week. So, I think it might be unfair to label her as something to get rid of. But just an opinion. I just have a pet peeve about language like that. Reminds me of getting rid of the garbage or getting rid of lice or rodents....
     
    06-20-2012, 07:06 PM
  #19
Trained
Elizabeth, I know how difficult training a young horse is.

We had a filly born here. We did so much training with her from the day she was born (May 23rd) up until it was very cold out. Probably November/December. Then we stopped working with her as much. We don't do much with out horses in the winter time. Feed them, love on them but they are rarely worked or ridden.

That was our mistake. That winter, she NEEDED to be worked with, and we didn't do it. Ever since that first winter, she was difficult to deal with. When it came time to her being started under saddle, she was a pain in the ass. I sent her to a professional trainer, she did great at the trainers but every time she came home, she was a different horse. She KNEW she could get away with it. I have started numerous horses under saddle and never been afraid. I even wore a helmet. (Which I don't do for whatever reason...lol...I should) But this mare intimidated me. She had my number and I knew it.

I stuck it out with her for 5 years. Sent her to a professional trainer 3 times. We did great there, but at home she was such a little b*tch to deal with. I finally threw in the towel with her and I gave her to my trainer to find a new home for her. I knew that I was not capable enough for her. I've never had issues with any other horses, just her. I knew she had my number and I knew I wasn't qualified to be on her back. I was going to either get hurt or lose my temper.

I did feel obligated to keep her because she was born here. Because we had been the ones to basically "ruin" her.

After my trainer found her a new home, she passed away 10 days later due to acute kidney failure. No one ever figured out how it happened. My vet thinks she was born with an autoimmune disease that finally took over. She was always "off" so maybe she always tried to tell me something? Maybe she had been in pain for a long time? Maybe she just took advantage of me? I'll never know the answers.

I only feel guilty for one reason. I feel that if I hadn't gotten rid of her, she wouldn't have passed away. But I don't regret giving her to someone that had the ability and time to make her into something...anything. Except a danger to people.

Don't get me wrong, my mare had good ground manners and I could do whatever I wanted to her from the ground. But she was a pain in the ass under saddle and I couldn't handle her.

There comes a time when enough is enough and you need to move on and do what's best for the horse. At that point in time, I did what was best for my mare.

And I hope that you will be able to do what's best for this filly. She's young enough that someone with time and knowledge and turn her into something and teach her some respect. And that's exactly what she needs.
     
    06-21-2012, 10:35 AM
  #20
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
We don't do much with out horses in the winter time. Feed them, love on them but they are rarely worked or ridden.

I knew that I was not capable enough for her. I've never had issues with any other horses, just her. I knew she had my number and I knew I wasn't qualified to be on her back. I was going to either get hurt or lose my temper.

I did feel obligated to keep her because she was born here. Because we had been the ones to basically "ruin" her.

I only feel guilty for one reason. I feel that if I hadn't gotten rid of her, she wouldn't have passed away. But I don't regret giving her to someone that had the ability and time to make her into something...anything. Except a danger to people.

There comes a time when enough is enough and you need to move on and do what's best for the horse. At that point in time, I did what was best for my mare.

And I hope that you will be able to do what's best for this filly. She's young enough that someone with time and knowledge and turn her into something and teach her some respect. And that's exactly what she needs.
I think I agree with you whole-heartedly. My sister in law is terrified of her, and tries to work with her, but after a few antics she just quits. And I don't want to keep her just because she's pretty and was born here. I don't want anyone getting hurt. She had wonderful ground manners at one time. And personally I don't think i'm capable of helping her or training her at this point. Its getting to the point where i'm beginning to be intimidated by her as well, only because she tries to attack when you correct her. I usually don't fool with mine in the winter either, but every spring they new the drill, that lessons and riding was coming up and to behave, and also to be ready for rotational grazing. I really appreciate your words of wisdom and advice. Your story rings so close to whats going on with this filly. And I think its just best if I throw in the towel, and send her to a trainer, and hopefully to a better, more capable home. I believe she deserves better than whats going on now, and what has happened already. Now the hard part is going to be convincing my SIL that she deserves better. And as usual, i'm going to get the blame on why she was ruined and turned out the way she did. But i'd rather she went on to something better, rather than staying here and being a total disaster. How do I find a good local trainer?? I really don't know if any in my area.
     

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