Once again more trouble with SIL yearling filly - Page 3
   

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Once again more trouble with SIL yearling filly

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  • Difficulty leading yearling filly

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    06-21-2012, 11:10 AM
  #21
Weanling
If you keep her: Is there any where she can be put each day out of sight from the rest of her herd? Take her there for your daily sessions. Put new and different stuff around you so her mind is taken away from her herd. As soon as she gives you her attention, praise her and calmly lead her back to her herd. Do it several times a day so she learns as long as she is calm she gets to go back to her herd.

If she is ill mannered leading away take a long whip with you while you lead and insist on having her attention by pushing her rear away from you in turns on the forehand, backing up, going sideways, forewards, stop, back etc. don't give in to her manickness. If she acts rough by trying to lash out or kick, come down on her like a tonne of bricks and get rough back at her! Force her to pay attention to you otherwise she will get 'kicked' by your whip. Be dominating and a force to be reckoned with so she learns you do not tollerate bad manners.

As soon as she is listening, praise her. Make the right thing easy, the wrong thing hard.

Finding a trainer: Word of mouth is best. Go to your local tack store/ place where there are horsey people and ask for their opinions. Find a livery yard and ask the lasses there who they would reccommend. Get the name then go meet up with them and ask lots of questions along the lines of problem horses, youngsters, methods, success stories (too good to be true? Perhaps they're exaggerating to win you over??) and also ask if they've ever had any horses they couldn't train. Try them out and see how your filly reacts to them. If she shows signs of improvement, stick with them!
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    06-21-2012, 12:04 PM
  #22
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by OwnedByAlli    
If you keep her: Is there any where she can be put each day out of sight from the rest of her herd? Take her there for your daily sessions. Put new and different stuff around you so her mind is taken away from her herd. As soon as she gives you her attention, praise her and calmly lead her back to her herd. Do it several times a day so she learns as long as she is calm she gets to go back to her herd.

If she is ill mannered leading away take a long whip with you while you lead and insist on having her attention by pushing her rear away from you in turns on the forehand, backing up, going sideways, forewards, stop, back etc. don't give in to her manickness. If she acts rough by trying to lash out or kick, come down on her like a tonne of bricks and get rough back at her! Force her to pay attention to you otherwise she will get 'kicked' by your whip. Be dominating and a force to be reckoned with so she learns you do not tollerate bad manners.

As soon as she is listening, praise her. Make the right thing easy, the wrong thing hard.

Finding a trainer: Word of mouth is best. Go to your local tack store/ place where there are horsey people and ask for their opinions. Find a livery yard and ask the lasses there who they would reccommend. Get the name then go meet up with them and ask lots of questions along the lines of problem horses, youngsters, methods, success stories (too good to be true? Perhaps they're exaggerating to win you over??) and also ask if they've ever had any horses they couldn't train. Try them out and see how your filly reacts to them. If she shows signs of improvement, stick with them!
Ok. I will try, and if nothing is to avail then I will most likely be sending her away to someone. She isn't even mine, her owner is terrified of her, and hardly does anything with her. That's why I was leaning so hard on selling/giving her to a trainer to rehome/retrain. Thank you for your advice.
     
    06-21-2012, 12:20 PM
  #23
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizabeth Bowers    
I think I agree with you whole-heartedly. My sister in law is terrified of her, and tries to work with her, but after a few antics she just quits. And I don't want to keep her just because she's pretty and was born here. I don't want anyone getting hurt. She had wonderful ground manners at one time. And personally I don't think i'm capable of helping her or training her at this point. Its getting to the point where i'm beginning to be intimidated by her as well, only because she tries to attack when you correct her. I usually don't fool with mine in the winter either, but every spring they new the drill, that lessons and riding was coming up and to behave, and also to be ready for rotational grazing. I really appreciate your words of wisdom and advice. Your story rings so close to whats going on with this filly. And I think its just best if I throw in the towel, and send her to a trainer, and hopefully to a better, more capable home. I believe she deserves better than whats going on now, and what has happened already. Now the hard part is going to be convincing my SIL that she deserves better. And as usual, i'm going to get the blame on why she was ruined and turned out the way she did. But i'd rather she went on to something better, rather than staying here and being a total disaster. How do I find a good local trainer?? I really don't know if any in my area.

Not your fault necessarily. It's not your horse, and unless you were the one exclusively working with her, then it is not exclusively your responsibility. You said it yourself, you have your own horses to worry about, and it is the owner of the horse's responsibility to judge whether or not they can handle the horse. You may be more experienced, but don't take the blame for this. It's not your horse, there is only so much you can do.

The owner is intimidated by her. You are intimidated by her, and I don't blame you, she's dangerous. But just the fact that you stated that the owner "gives up" when she is pressed by the filly, makes me believe that is where the problem started. If she gave up on something small, the horse would naturally push harder and harder until she got at the stage she was now.

I'm not blaming anyone, as I really have no idea (not knowing the full situation or the horse personally) but I am just saying it isn't your fault. If your SIL couldn't handle the filly on her own, then maybe it was unwise of her to have a foal in the first place because she wasn't ready for it. Just a guess.
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    06-22-2012, 10:54 AM
  #24
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakotababii    
Not your fault necessarily. It's not your horse, and unless you were the one exclusively working with her, then it is not exclusively your responsibility. You said it yourself, you have your own horses to worry about, and it is the owner of the horse's responsibility to judge whether or not they can handle the horse. You may be more experienced, but don't take the blame for this. It's not your horse, there is only so much you can do.

The owner is intimidated by her. You are intimidated by her, and I don't blame you, she's dangerous. But just the fact that you stated that the owner "gives up" when she is pressed by the filly, makes me believe that is where the problem started. If she gave up on something small, the horse would naturally push harder and harder until she got at the stage she was now.

I'm not blaming anyone, as I really have no idea (not knowing the full situation or the horse personally) but I am just saying it isn't your fault. If your SIL couldn't handle the filly on her own, then maybe it was unwise of her to have a foal in the first place because she wasn't ready for it. Just a guess.
Her dad bought her(SIL here is only 16), a mare, and we didn't know she was bred, and that's how all of this came about. I personally never had experience with a foal either, I had my mom helping me with my husbands colt, because I had no idea. Thank you for your kind words. And no I wasn't the only one working with her, I was showing her owner how to take care of her, and work with her, but like I said she would give up on any little fit the filly threw. And little by little, she started to stop working with her because her fear was getting the best of her and the filly knew it. I think its best if she goes off to a new home/trainer.
*i would take what my mom showed me to do, and would show her what to do with her horse.*
     
    06-22-2012, 11:14 AM
  #25
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizabeth Bowers    
Her dad bought her(SIL here is only 16), a mare, and we didn't know she was bred, and that's how all of this came about. I personally never had experience with a foal either, I had my mom helping me with my husbands colt, because I had no idea. Thank you for your kind words. And no I wasn't the only one working with her, I was showing her owner how to take care of her, and work with her, but like I said she would give up on any little fit the filly threw. And little by little, she started to stop working with her because her fear was getting the best of her and the filly knew it. I think its best if she goes off to a new home/trainer.
*i would take what my mom showed me to do, and would show her what to do with her horse.*

Yeah unfortunately that does happen. Babies are harder, because they are so cute when they are born that it is easy to spoil them. But then they grow up, and they learn that they can push you around. You have to be tough love on them from the start basically, otherwise they learn very quickly that they can dominate you.

Yearlings that have been spoiled can be brought back, but it takes a lot of experience and know how to do it. I think it would be wise to sell her to someone who can really help her.
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    06-22-2012, 11:20 AM
  #26
Started
Animals do not have human emotions.......... They have herd instincts, horse instincts, animal instincts. We, as humans, but human emotions on animals. They do not think about yesterday, tomorrow or anything but what is happening right now.
Shoving into you, bucking you off, pushing you around, that is no jealous, that is an animal moving up in the ranks of the herd, she is shoving, bucking, throwing fits because she wants to outrank you. Going through fences is because she is herd bound and wants to be with the herd.
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    06-22-2012, 11:32 AM
  #27
Showing
Horse read people and know if someone is a friendly pushover or will take a leadership role. From what I've read, even your mother's horse figured this out. Nothing to do with jealousy or hating that you were born. It was something the mare sensed. Before the filly is put up for sale, why not take some lessons in groundwork. A few good lessons can go a long way to changing your relationship with horses. When working with this filly ask only of something she can do even if it's just walk 10' and whoa then put her away. That is a huge reward. Do this 3 or 4 times a day, walking a little farther and putting her away. She's not long away from the others and it sets up a routine. When you turn her, always turn her away from you, not to the left. When you turn her away you are asserting your dominance over her. When you turn her toward you she is dominating you.
     
    06-25-2012, 01:00 PM
  #28
Yearling
Update on the filly's situation. I discussed what I thought was best for her, and once again I got shut down. They claim they're going to break her this fall. I'm waiting on a disaster to happen and for her to be sold anyway. But I did my best to better that horses life, and now I can't do anything. Because (for some reason unbeknownst to them, that they have no horse sense or skills) they are going to fix it and my SIL will be able to handle her again, even though she's terrified of this horse. So I will keep posted of what happens to this little horse.
*Seriously I can't do anything about it, because I don't want my inlaws to throw me and my husband out, and threaten to sell my herd, because I went against their laws I guess you could call it* I tried.... :(
     
    06-25-2012, 01:25 PM
  #29
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizabeth Bowers    
Update on the filly's situation. I discussed what I thought was best for her, and once again I got shut down. They claim they're going to break her this fall. I'm waiting on a disaster to happen and for her to be sold anyway. But I did my best to better that horses life, and now I can't do anything. Because (for some reason unbeknownst to them, that they have no horse sense or skills) they are going to fix it and my SIL will be able to handle her again, even though she's terrified of this horse. So I will keep posted of what happens to this little horse.
*Seriously I can't do anything about it, because I don't want my inlaws to throw me and my husband out, and threaten to sell my herd, because I went against their laws I guess you could call it* I tried.... :(
Too bad. All you can do is try. At least you are on record with your recommendation. So when someone gets hurt, hopefully they will then listen. Just hope they don't take it out on the horse.
Elizabeth Bowers likes this.
     
    06-25-2012, 01:32 PM
  #30
Yearling
Just hope they don't take it out on the horse.[/QUOTE]

Thanks, and me too.
     

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