Once again more trouble with SIL yearling filly - Page 4
 
 

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Once again more trouble with SIL yearling filly

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  • Clingy filly

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    06-25-2012, 01:33 PM
  #31
Super Moderator
difficult yearling

My old mare was a hand reared foal that I bought as a 3 year old to save her from being put down (my vet, also their vet, who had been asked to euthanise her asked me if I would give her a chance) She was a 15.2 monster because she'd never been taught boundaries and discipline, she had been allowed as a foal to 'jump up' like a dog and put her hooves on their shoulders - imagine a 15.2 that still thinks they can do that, they were shoving candies down her every 5 minutes to placate her which was like a reward for bad behaviour. She'd never been kept with other horses so first thing we did was to take her away from her human herd and put her in with a firm but safe old gelding who taught her in about 5 minutes that her behaviour wasn't going to be tolerated by him. Second thing I did was to hit her really hard and she knew from that moment on that I meant business and 'no more monster'
This filly is just going to get worse if she isn't leaned on really hard now.
Could she not be split from the herd she's so clingy too and kept with one sensible horse? Maybe kept in a stall situation with a daily turnout paddock where she has to rely on humans for her needs instead of relying on the herd.
You're not in a great situation here but a horse with this sort of attitude is not for the nervous and /or inexperienced owner. Someone stands to get seriously injured.
Elizabeth Bowers likes this.
     
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    06-25-2012, 01:52 PM
  #32
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
This filly is just going to get worse if she isn't leaned on really hard now.
Could she not be split from the herd she's so clingy too and kept with one sensible horse? Maybe kept in a stall situation with a daily turnout paddock where she has to rely on humans for her needs instead of relying on the herd.
You're not in a great situation here but a horse with this sort of attitude is not for the nervous and /or inexperienced owner. Someone stands to get seriously injured.

No, the barn isn't finished, the previous pasture is too rundown yet for it to hold a horse or two. Personally I don't think the barn will ever get finished. They don't have the proper facilities for horses at all, and sadly I have to make due with what they have. I tried to explain that to them (since her grandparents run everything for her, she really has no say) *really makes me mad, And they just refuse to listen that this could very well turn into a very bad/dangerous situation. I'm trying to reason so that they understand, and do what right for both of them not just the horse. They just don't want to hear it. And I just don't know what to do about it anymore.
     
    06-25-2012, 02:12 PM
  #33
Super Moderator
problem yearling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizabeth Bowers    
No, the barn isn't finished, the previous pasture is too rundown yet for it to hold a horse or two. Personally I don't think the barn will ever get finished. They don't have the proper facilities for horses at all, and sadly I have to make due with what they have. I tried to explain that to them (since her grandparents run everything for her, she really has no say) *really makes me mad, And they just refuse to listen that this could very well turn into a very bad/dangerous situation. I'm trying to reason so that they understand, and do what right for both of them not just the horse. They just don't want to hear it. And I just don't know what to do about it anymore.
If you can walk away from it then you should, their horse, their problem. Don't for one moment put your own well being at risk because they are too stubborn or stupid to admit that they are out of their depth
Good luck, I feel so sorry for you and for the horse but you have to put yourself first.
Elizabeth Bowers likes this.
     
    06-25-2012, 05:30 PM
  #34
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
If you can walk away from it then you should, their horse, their problem. Don't for one moment put your own well being at risk because they are too stubborn or stupid to admit that they are out of their depth
Good luck, I feel so sorry for you and for the horse but you have to put yourself first.
Thanks, and your right.
     

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