one rein stop AND half halts
 
 

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one rein stop AND half halts

This is a discussion on one rein stop AND half halts within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        03-28-2014, 12:27 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Question one rein stop AND half halts

    Do you guys feel that you can use both on trail rides OR do you feel that the half halt will dull the one rein stop?
    I have a friend that will not use a half halt when her horse gets rushy but will one rein stop him every single time.
    I use a one rein stop if I feel like we are truly out of control and use the half halts for just rushing or do some zig zagging.
         
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        03-28-2014, 12:51 PM
      #2
    Super Moderator
    Why would you go all the way to a ORS if a slight hold with rein and seat will do the trick? THAT will dull your horse out. The purpose of the one rein stop is to say something like, "hey! You didn't listen to my asking you to slow with just a little rein and seat, so now you need to get out of the barging forward mentality and lets start over and see if you can do it right the next time". And the next time , you try to ask lightly. How else would you ever improve your horse's "brakes"? Continually Stomping on them will not make them more sensitive.
         
        03-28-2014, 12:58 PM
      #3
    Foal
    That was what I was thinking.... why start HIGH to begin with? Unless you have no choice like in a runaway.
         
        03-28-2014, 09:39 PM
      #4
    Trained
    Do as little as possible, but as much as necessary.
    Lcarolyn likes this.
         
        03-28-2014, 09:48 PM
      #5
    Trained
    They're not the same maneuver so HH will not affect ORS. If someone is jumping right to an ORS I would guess a lot of it is due to fear on the rider's part and the horse not knowing how to respond to a HH.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    bsms likes this.
         
        03-29-2014, 02:28 AM
      #6
    Foal
    A half halt is very important when you want to slow down, speed up or remind your horse who is in control. A well executed half halt could be the difference between jumping a fence and knocking the top bar because your horse wasn't concentrating.

    One of the body parts we need to control is the horses neck. During the Foundation of Ground Training we teach the horse Lateral Flexion. Lateral flexion disengages the hindquarters, teaches the horse to give to pressure from one direct rein, warms the muscles, is calming before more difficult exercises and prepares the horse mentally before asking for a more advanced exercise.

    The lateral flexion is used by some riders as the one rein stop that has proven to be a very dangerous method of stopping a horse! If the horses gait is faster than a walk; horse and rider have tumbled to the ground resulting in serious injuries.

    If a horse does not stop from your cues; seat, verbal whoa and/or reins it is not trained and/or the rider is not educated!
         
        03-29-2014, 02:58 AM
      #7
    Yearling
    Cultivate the ability to do both. You may find an occasion to use either method, someday. As a rule though, I'm generally in agreement with you. Better to use the more subtle technique as much as possible.
         
        03-29-2014, 10:46 AM
      #8
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mobilenaturaltrainer    
    ...The lateral flexion is used by some riders as the one rein stop that has proven to be a very dangerous method of stopping a horse! If the horses gait is faster than a walk; horse and rider have tumbled to the ground resulting in serious injuries.

    If a horse does not stop from your cues; seat, verbal whoa and/or reins it is not trained and/or the rider is not educated!
    First, a ORS is not dangerous. A trained ORS involves pulling back a little on one rein as a cue to stop. It is simply a CUE. A variation is spiraling to slow a horse down and stop it, which works very well when there is room. A violent yank on one rein is NOT the definition of a ORS...although it is possible for a horse to gallop with its nose at your knee. A ORS is no more likely to result in a crash than any other stop, but ANY bolt can result in a wreck.

    It is best to have several techniques in your bag of clues, so you can use the one that makes the most sense for that case.

    Second, a horse who stops great in an arena may not stop if spooked on a trail. Or it may fight stopping if doing a canter or gallop with another horse in the open. Many of us are imperfect riders with imperfect horses.

    Third, a half halt should have no impact on a horse obeying a ORS cue. I'm not a big fan of the ORS, but the horse will have no trouble distinguishing between a half-halt and a ORS.
         
        03-29-2014, 10:51 AM
      #9
    Green Broke
    As My said, there is a fine balance of too much and too little, and it takes some practice to find it.

    That said, I don't really understand why your friend thinks a half halt would dull her horse, as a half halt and one reined stop are different cues used for different purposes.
         
        03-29-2014, 11:04 AM
      #10
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    First, a ORS is not dangerous. A trained ORS involves pulling back a little on one rein as a cue to stop. It is simply a CUE. A variation is spiraling to slow a horse down and stop it, which works very well when there is room. A violent yank on one rein is NOT the definition of a ORS...although it is possible for a horse to gallop with its nose at your knee. A ORS is no more likely to result in a crash than any other stop, but ANY bolt can result in a wreck.

    It is best to have several techniques in your bag of clues, so you can use the one that makes the most sense for that case.

    Second, a horse who stops great in an arena may not stop if spooked on a trail. Or it may fight stopping if doing a canter or gallop with another horse in the open. Many of us are imperfect riders with imperfect horses.

    Third, a half halt should have no impact on a horse obeying a ORS cue. I'm not a big fan of the ORS, but the horse will have no trouble distinguishing between a half-halt and a ORS.
    The reason people say ORS is dangerous because generally speaking, by the way it's taught, its dangerous. Forget what it's supposed to be, look at how it's actually carried out.

    People are taught to ORS by yanking their horse's nose to their boot, and in horses that are NH trained this may also cause the horse to disengage its hindquarters. Both can cause a horse to lose balance and tumble, taking the rider with them. It's also incredibly easy for someone fearful to do it on accident. That's why I went from advising people to learn the ORS and advise pulley rein instead.
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