Opinions on an OTTB - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Opinions on an OTTB

This is a discussion on Opinions on an OTTB within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    Like Tree13Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        01-13-2013, 09:04 AM
      #21
    Started
    As much as I like re-purposing OTTBs, if I was looking for a pleasure horse, even one for lower level showing, they would not be my choice.

    I haven't had the problems some describe (pulling back makes them go faster, they won't walk in a relaxed manner), but they are built for speed and endurance. When I'm riding one, I darn sure feel mounted and definitely pay attention to how I'm cuing and how the horse is receiving and responding to the message.

    My favorites for pleasure owning are still the been there done that horses in their teens. Usually know the basics well. Can be retrained to a large extent. Are usually quite forgiving of inconsistent riding/cuing. Have many good years left.
    Tessa7707 likes this.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        01-22-2013, 12:00 AM
      #22
    Weanling
    Just wanted to share my experience after meeting this OTTB. These guys definitely someone experienced in retraining them, they do require substantial retraining. I feel like I was misled by not on,y the barn owner but the girl showing him as well. They have been told to 'go! Go! Go!' And all of a sudden you're asking for slow, and its confusing for them. Even 'exceptions', as this kid was supposed to be, need retraining. When the person went to mount, he shied away, she was halfway on, he side-jumped 5 feet and bolted forward another 10 feet before bucking twice and successfully tossing her over his head. To anyone reading this, Golden Horse and the others are right. These guys need extensive retraining by someone experienced with track horses.
    Golden Horse and FaydesMom like this.
         
        01-25-2013, 01:19 AM
      #23
    Foal
    Oh dear, the misinformation!

    As with any breed, you can NOT lump all OTTB's into one category. It all depends on the individual horse. 2 of my 4 OTTB's I got straight off the track wouldn't run away with you if you tried to make them! Neither of them ever did a thing wrong and after some downtime and minimal re riding, one went to a 6 year old boy and the other went to an adult beginner and were perfect for them.

    Time to dispel some myths....
    There is no such thing as a "cold blooded" TB. I don't know where you've heard that.

    Their feet are not trimmed "very short", they are kept up with. A TB generally gets new shoes every 4 weeks. You do have to pay attention because often track shoeing means the horse is given low heels and long toes. This can almost always be corrected with proper shoeing (nothing fancy or therapeautic, just a few cycles of good work). Their feet are not bruised, but they are also used to being on cushy, well manicured surfaces and rock/dirt free. TB's feet are usually cleaned at least twice a day. They can have thin soles and be prone to bruises but many TB's do just fine barefoot once they have adjusted.

    Racehorses get EXCELLENT nutrition. They are pumped full of vitamins. However many of them will "crash" once they come off the track because they are no longer recieving the amount and quality of feed and care they are used to, as well as sometimes medications. For a couple months, they might just be hard to keep weight on, they are going to loose a lot of muscle and just might not look all that great. They will get over this once their body adjusts.

    TB's can make GREAT pleasure and trail mounts. Time spent on the track and number of races has so many variables, I would never count a horse out because it's had too many starts or not enough. Some horses who have run forever are totally mellow because they have been there, done that. Some are very used to the way things are and harder to retrain. People seem to like horses that haven't run much because they think they will be sounder, but unless the horse didn't run because it was just slow, it might not have been sound enough to hold up to racing.

    Track trainers are very unlikely to drug up a horse to make it calm to get rid of it.

    If you are moving to Kentucky, I would wait to get a horse because you are going to spend a fortune to move it from Colorado, and there are BAJILLIONS of amazing OTTBs right there in Kentucky. You will have many more options to choose from.

    Also keep in mind that often pictures off CANTER do NOT do the horse a bit of justice. They do great work, but the horses are rarely set up well and camera angles can be deceiving. It's worth it to go look at the horse in person before passing any judgement on them. They are often muscled very differently than what you expect to see in a show horse.

    Also keep in mind that any horse straight off the track is going to do best having some downtime for a few months. They need to unwind, clear their system and their brains, and relearn what it means to just be a horse again. No riding, no serious work, just a little vacation.
         
        01-25-2013, 05:43 AM
      #24
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mstar    
    Track trainers are very unlikely to drug up a horse to make it calm to get rid of it.
    I got that information straight from a dentist who does work with a lot of race barns. There ARE trainers only in it for the money. Horses are expensive to continually keep and feed, and I'm sure people with the motivation of money loss, will do such a thing, since there are people that do that.
         
        01-25-2013, 07:16 AM
      #25
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KylieHuitema    
    I got that information straight from a dentist who does work with a lot of race barns. There ARE trainers only in it for the money. Horses are expensive to continually keep and feed, and I'm sure people with the motivation of money loss, will do such a thing, since there are people that do that.
    Maybe they drug them up for the dental work? I have to agree that where I am from the trainers are pretty honest in representing their horses and rarely drug them to sell them.

    I can only speak from my own experience. I have had ONE ottb, who was lovely. His ground manners were impeccable, and I am of the opinion that the grooms don't take any crap, so they are made to behave. I found that they can be more sensitive to grooming-ie the curry.......and ticklish. My guy carried my daughter when she was 7-8 yrs old and was a trustworthy mount. Only thing I found, which made me laugh, was that he was difficult in the show ring. He kept going faster and faster and seemingly could not figure out why he kept passing the same horses! Granted I didn't show much, and, like I said, it just made me smile. He would also react when the barn phone rang.......lol
    I will say that he was from the Northern Dancer Line, and had HORRIBLE feet. I have heard from others who have TB's from similar lines that they also had bad feet. I spent more on shoes for this guy than my entire family. His feet were so bad, that when I researched him at a local racing library, I found that he had ben sent to New Bolton, in Pa and actually had had his hoof walls replaced with acrylic at one point, which absolutely horrified me. I got him as a rescue......and like I said-he was lovely.
         
        01-25-2013, 03:51 PM
      #26
    Weanling
    OTTBs are great, I love mine, but he was an easy one. Not all of them are easy to re-school. I worked for New Vocations (2 years after I had already gotten my OTTB) and learned a lot, and it made me understand why my own horses didn't fully understand some of the things I was asking him to do. But he turned out to be an awesome horse.

    I am a UK student, hope you enjoy it. I will be graduating in December and I have had some of the best experiences of my life here. But, when you say you can keep him at the school's barn, what do you mean? The only farm the University owns (where they keep horses) is the research farm (Main Chance) and they don't board horses there...and it is probably a 20 minute drive from campus.

    I would recommend getting yourself settled into school, then looking for a horse. There are a lot to pick from here, especially if you are interested in getting one off the track.
         
        01-25-2013, 03:54 PM
      #27
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by boots    
    As much as I like re-purposing OTTBs, if I was looking for a pleasure horse, even one for lower level showing, they would not be my choice.

    I haven't had the problems some describe (pulling back makes them go faster, they won't walk in a relaxed manner), but they are built for speed and endurance. When I'm riding one, I darn sure feel mounted and definitely pay attention to how I'm cuing and how the horse is receiving and responding to the message.

    My favorites for pleasure owning are still the been there done that horses in their teens. Usually know the basics well. Can be retrained to a large extent. Are usually quite forgiving of inconsistent riding/cuing. Have many good years left.
    My OTTB spent 2 years on the track...he is the most laid back horse I know and has been very successful in the show ring. Even more so than my retired paint gelding. And Thoroughbreds used to be the most common horse in the show ring and hunt fields until Warmbloods started to show up. They make excellent horses, no matter what you want them to do, you just have to find the one that suits your needs.
    Mstar likes this.
         
        01-25-2013, 04:04 PM
      #28
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustWingIt    
    Just wanted to share this. This website is a large OTTB rescue, I believe they take them straight from the track and bring them to one of their locations (Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky) and being retraining process. I found this specific page "Thoroughbred Tips" funny and informative Thoroughbred Tips | New Vocations
    For example, it explains how most OTTBs have never been on cross-ties, they are normally just tied to a wall. And how for racing thoroughbreds, grooming isn't a gentle process.
    I worked for New Vocations KY (I know most of the horses in those pictures and my boss, well, old boss, wrote that all up). They do a really great job. All of their horses come directly from the track or out of rehab from an injury. They don't turn down horses, but there is a waiting list for the facilities and as soon as a spot opens up, a new one ships in. I learned a lot in my time there.
         
        01-25-2013, 04:16 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    Although I'm not an expert at all on OTTBs nor training horses, I did have an OTTB. She raced for seven years, and was used as a broodmare but was brought back into work by her previous owner.. although there were many holes in the gap. My instructor told me from the start to not get an OTTB, but that was the type of horse I wanted, so I searched and searched.

    When I tried Indie out, the first ride wasn't great in the slightest but it wasn't horrible. There was lots of half halting and a bit of head tossing and trying to trot off. Fast forward to my second visit, she went like a dream! So, we got a vet check and had her trailered down to the barn a week later.

    Our first ride when she arrived was interesting. You could even read my progress journal if you wanted. We spent a good week (about 5 to 6 rides) just trying to walk a circle without trotting off. Many good job pats later, she got it down and before she died, she was coming along incredibly fast. Of course, I rode her five to six times a week, twice in a lesson... but from what I've learned, dedication and patience are key components to being successful with an OTTB.

    My experience with OTTBs is limited to Indie, but she was the most kind-hearted, willing horse I ever had the pleasure of meeting. OTTBs aren't an ideal horse for everyone, especially not a first-time owner (although I had been leasing and riding for quite awhile) but I'm glad I made that "mistake". My next horse will be another OTTB although by that time, I hope to have found a dressage trainer and someone especially experienced in OTTBs but until then, I have plenty of fun researching and keeping up with my riding.
         
        01-25-2013, 04:23 PM
      #30
    Foal
    I just saw a comment that you are moving from Colorado to Kentucky. If you decide to go with an OTTB I would wait until you move. In my experience, the OTTBs in Colorado are over priced and do not have as good a confirmation as a horse from CA or KY.
    boots and Tryst like this.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Your OTTB - what do you do? SeamusCrimin Horse Training 3 10-14-2012 07:55 PM
    opinions on possible purchase of this ottb for lower level eventing Tabbi Kat Horse Riding Critique 25 04-04-2011 02:28 PM
    Please give opinions of this gelding (OTTB) Starlite Horse Riding Critique 13 02-23-2011 08:11 PM
    Opinions on progress of OTTB One year off the track hiwaythreetwenty Eventing 6 01-09-2011 08:33 PM
    Which bit for my OTTB? txhorsejumper Horse Training 15 12-25-2010 07:46 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:13 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0