Paso fino riding question
 
 

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Paso fino riding question

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  • How to not let trot your paso fino
  • My paso trips a lot

 
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    02-10-2013, 11:03 AM
  #1
Foal
Paso fino riding question

So I have a three year old paso fino. He is green right now and not all that sure what to do with his feet in anything other than a walk. He trips ALOT. We ared starting to work more on his trot now that its starting to warm up a bit. My problem is this: I've never owned a paso fino and their trot isn't a trot. I have no desire to teach him to really gait. He will only be a trail horse. So. His "trot" is of course very fast paced. I can't really post on him because of this. If I sit it, it's uncomfortable for him and me. So I've just been trying to stay up and off his back. Any suggestions on how to hane this??? Try to post, sit, or stay up????
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    02-10-2013, 11:09 AM
  #2
Trained
Let him gait. It will be more comfortable for both of you and it's something he can keep up for hours on end, even through rough terrain. Their gait is more natural to them than the trot, which is why is trot is so awkward.
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    02-10-2013, 11:24 AM
  #3
Foal
Well his gait is awkward too. I let him just do whatever he wants, but its usually a jumbled mess. I'm thinking just practice will get him into what he's ultimately comfortable with. I just don't know how to be in the saddle
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    02-10-2013, 11:42 AM
  #4
Green Broke
If you want a trail horse that will jog trot for however long, is this Paso Fino the right horse for your needs, and you for him?
     
    02-10-2013, 12:16 PM
  #5
Weanling
I've ridden a few finished Paso Finos, and their gait was comfortable to sit, although very quick. Yours will probably become more comfortable as he develops balance and rhythm. I am under the impression that Pasos are one of the few breeds that naturally gait; so I wouldn't try to get him to trot. Hopefully, one of the gaited horse trainers will post to let you know if you should sit or stay off his back while he's learning.
     
    02-10-2013, 12:18 PM
  #6
Trained
Let him gait. When he's rough he may be confused or off balance. Drive him forward but let him gait.
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    03-15-2013, 01:35 AM
  #7
Foal
Wink The Paso Fino Smile

Ok! I'm not an expert. But I've been riding Paso Finos since I was 4.
First things first, put your butt into the seat of your saddle and sit, do not raise or "post," sit like you would on a carousel horse, relax. Your horse will not relax if you do not. That's maybe why you feel he is uncomfortable with you sitting.
Do not Post. Pasos are known for their 3 natural gaits: Corto, Largo, Fino. Fino is the hardest because it requires too much collection and is usually only for show horses. Largo is like a 4 beat canter, basically the same as a Corto only faster.
What you refer to as his "Trot" it's called a Corto. A 4 beat gait that requires one foot to hit the ground at a time and yes it seems very "fast" but it's so natural to him and his breed that its like you when you were first born, you cried. If you can train your horse to properly perform the Corto, you have a perfect smooth riding endurance trail horse. They are the best out there and have outdone Arabians in endurance races. I know I had one, and I beat 3 Arabians and 2 half Arabs with him and he Cortoed the whole time. It's actually quite easy to train them as long as you approach it with confidence and proper instruction. Pasos are very intelligent.
Start with a very mild, gentle spoon big. It'll help him collect his head properly, you will have to learn to hold the reins at the right tightness for that too. Next teach him to move according to pressure in your saddle so you won't have to move your hands much.
But most importantly, SIT relaxed in the deepest part of your saddle, apply pressure with your inner things. Basically ride him as if he were bareback. If it helps, take your stirrups away to teach yourself. I am learning and training my mare, Madam Rosatta, and she's very choppy. Every day I start on her feels like I'm being shaken to bits, but she eventually collects herself and smooths out well. Each day it gets better. This is how it will be for you. Your horse is 3, mine is 6. See the difference? Pasos at 3 years old is like having a Thoroughbred at 1 year old. Not as calm or collected yet.
All you have to do is practice and sit in that saddle like you aren't going anywhere even if he were to do a 360 degree turn on you. You need to work on looking motionless in your saddle and yet very relaxed, look up show Pasos, see how their riders sit. The more relaxed you become with your seat and with teaching him to collect, the smoother his ride will become and all your future trail rides will be a breeze... LIterally! Good luck!
     
    03-15-2013, 01:38 AM
  #8
Foal
* *start with a gentle and mild spoon BIT**
Snaffled and straight bits irritate new training Paso horses, once he's gaited properly, you can switch him to a straight bit.

Not big. Stupid auto correct.
     
    03-15-2013, 01:40 AM
  #9
Foal
** Put pressure on the saddle with your inner thighs**

UGH! I can't type!
     
    03-15-2013, 01:41 AM
  #10
Foal
BTW, try lunging him ALOT into a Corto and see how his gait looks from the ground at a steady pace. Work him from the ground up. I've always done that ALOT and it helps.
     

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