Pasture or round pen for a mustang? - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
 19Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #31 of 37 Old 06-28-2013, 01:18 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 106
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by natisha View Post
In that case maybe it would be beneficial to take him into the pasture on a lunge line. See how he behaves, if he gets too excited or anything like that. Let the line out, let him graze & practice walking up to him or softly bringing him to you. That may give you an idea of his response & get him used to you approaching him in a larger area.
You'll need to keep the other horses away somehow though. Maybe another person could do that.
I've hand grazed him in the herd and he's done great, and Im currently trying to find a new lunge line after I lost my old one a few months back. I will do that with him as well. It's not something I've usually done, but a good precaution.
Posted via Mobile Device
MustangGirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of 37 Old 06-28-2013, 03:35 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 807
• Horses: 2
My boy was also in the wild until he was over 6 yrs old (he's 11 now) and after I had him about a year I put him in a small 5 acre pasture and quickly discovered he had no respect for fences. He saw some mares a couple of pastures over and he sailed fences like a deer. Luckily we had done so much round pen work in that first year that he knew it was time to come home when I approached. SO... he spent several months in a larger paddock with my husbands Belgian. They bonded as a herd pair and now when they go out to pasture with each other he no longer feels the strong call of the wild. It does get a little dicey when a large herd of deer or elk come through, but so far he just puts his head up, sniffs the wind for danger and does that awesome blowing sound that can be heard across the valley! A little anxious trotting but having the Belgian as a danger barometer has been very valuable. He's since learned that if the other horses are calm, everything is fine. (Although the smoke from our forest fires makes him understandably nervous)

In the end, there's no real way to know until you try! Good luck and let us know how it goes!
Boo Walker is offline  
post #33 of 37 Old 06-28-2013, 04:11 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 106
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boo Walker View Post
My boy was also in the wild until he was over 6 yrs old (he's 11 now) and after I had him about a year I put him in a small 5 acre pasture and quickly discovered he had no respect for fences. He saw some mares a couple of pastures over and he sailed fences like a deer. Luckily we had done so much round pen work in that first year that he knew it was time to come home when I approached. SO... he spent several months in a larger paddock with my husbands Belgian. They bonded as a herd pair and now when they go out to pasture with each other he no longer feels the strong call of the wild. It does get a little dicey when a large herd of deer or elk come through, but so far he just puts his head up, sniffs the wind for danger and does that awesome blowing sound that can be heard across the valley! A little anxious trotting but having the Belgian as a danger barometer has been very valuable. He's since learned that if the other horses are calm, everything is fine. (Although the smoke from our forest fires makes him understandably nervous)

In the end, there's no real way to know until you try! Good luck and let us know how it goes!
How did the training with your mustang go? Has he turned out to be a nice horse? I'm interested to hear others experiences with the 'Stangs.
Posted via Mobile Device
MustangGirl is offline  
post #34 of 37 Old 06-28-2013, 09:20 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 5,787
• Horses: 0
In the eight or nine weeks my kids had theirs, they all turned into decent little riding horses. Neck rein. Stop nicely. Go well at all gaits. Back up. They didn't do any roping on them, though they did move cattle when we needed to and had ropes swung off them.

A couple of them preferred not to go real close to cedar trees, but would with outside leg.

They all got bathed. Swam with the kids. Had ribbons put in their hair. Went on picnics. Learned to stand hobbled. Stood tied to the yard rail fence while "their" girls did yard work or painted or washed windows or cars. Went to town to the park and got tied to swing sets or slides.

They got treated like pets because the kids knew that was the market for these little guys.
boots is offline  
post #35 of 37 Old 06-28-2013, 09:52 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,188
• Horses: 24
Hmm, actually, my biggest concern would be just the putting him out with other horses with no real introduction first. Before I turn mine out I like them to share a fenceline with their potential herd-mates so that there is a safe exit in case one of them gets a little too aggressive. My 'stang is a very dominant horse and he will whip the crap out of any horse that tries to act like a big boss around him.

I didn't have the experience of them "reverting" the first time I turned either of mine out (or the feral filly I got this spring either), and they were captured at 2 and 3...left wild until 3 and 5. I just make sure that they are comfortable with me walking right up to them and, while I normally don't approve of hand feeding treats to horses, I do treat mine when they approach me in the pasture...just to solidify being easy to catch.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
post #36 of 37 Old 06-28-2013, 10:19 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 106
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
Hmm, actually, my biggest concern would be just the putting him out with other horses with no real introduction first. Before I turn mine out I like them to share a fenceline with their potential herd-mates so that there is a safe exit in case one of them gets a little too aggressive. My 'stang is a very dominant horse and he will whip the crap out of any horse that tries to act like a big boss around him.

I didn't have the experience of them "reverting" the first time I turned either of mine out (or the feral filly I got this spring either), and they were captured at 2 and 3...left wild until 3 and 5. I just make sure that they are comfortable with me walking right up to them and, while I normally don't approve of hand feeding treats to horses, I do treat mine when they approach me in the pasture...just to solidify being easy to catch.
What do you do as a real introduction? Usually the other horses hanging out by the round pen and hand grazing with the herd seems to work fine.

I should not that my round pen is in the middle of the field..my horses can walk right up to V whenever they want, sniff noses, and kick each other (thankfully the bars keep everyone safe)

The first few days that V was in there, him and my head gelding had some major "fights" but nobody was hurt and they've calmed down.
Posted via Mobile Device
smrobs likes this.
MustangGirl is offline  
post #37 of 37 Old 06-28-2013, 10:28 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,188
• Horses: 24
I generally don't keep them on a lead when I finally decide to turn them out. IMHO, too much risk of them getting into it and me getting caught with an hoof aimed for another horse. I keep a halter on the horse I'm turning out (something that will break/come off in an emergency like leather) and just let them go. There is bound to be some fighting and chasing at first but I just stick close and watch. They will either eventually calm down or it will escalate to real violence. If anyone starts getting really aggressive, I will intervene immediately. I will also sometimes leave the new horse and remove the aggressor from the pasture for a few days.

When I first turned my Taz out into the big pasture, Rafe was being really aggressive and trying to run him through the fence, so I took Rafe and kept him penned in the barn for 3-4 days while Taz got acclimated to the pasture. Then I turned Rafe back out and all was well.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Round pen help gamingirl22 Horse Training 1 04-19-2013 05:13 PM
Looking for Round Pen lasso Tack and Equipment Classifieds 0 02-27-2013 08:44 PM
Round Pen... what's that all about then? Shropshirerosie Horse Training 18 05-17-2012 12:10 PM
Round pen is on its way! goldilockz Barn Maintenance 1 07-02-2011 07:18 PM
How does he look in the round pen? CopperHorse Horse Training 6 03-18-2011 10:55 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome