Peanut the pony
 
 

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Peanut the pony

This is a discussion on Peanut the pony within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Peanut das pony
  • Horse grabby for treats

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    11-10-2012, 12:51 AM
  #1
Foal
Peanut the pony

Hi everyone! I am training this little shetland pony named Peanut. He is coming along quite well but he still has some quirks. Does anyone have any ideas on how to fix any of the things in my list?
*Rearing when we back up*
*Freaking out with fly spray*
*Freaking out around dogs*
*Attemting to trample you when you lead him*
*Attacking you for treats*

If you have any ideas on any of these please let me know. I can use all the help I can get with this little guy. He has the sweetest personality ever he just is a trouble maker. He now trusts me so much that he will just follow me around without lead or anything. I think I must have done join up correctly. One day we were just walking around and all of a sudden this dog came running up and barking outside the arena and he backed ran forward and reared. I really want to fix this to make him safe for other people to ride him safely.

Thanks for you help!!
equinegirl26 likes this.
     
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    11-10-2012, 03:09 AM
  #2
Yearling
Downunder Horsemanship TV

Some technique's here that may help you with ground manners.
And if a horse gets too grabby with treats I will bump their mouth, wait til they stop being grabby, then give the treat. Fly spray I usually would spray, say good girl/boy them give a treat right away, I would do that several times and before you know it they can't wait to get sprayed... Or keep spraying untill they stand then you stop.
Pressure then release when you get what you want.
EmilyJoy likes this.
     
    11-10-2012, 12:10 PM
  #3
Yearling
Your training Him but don't know what to do?

Rearing I just let a horse meet the ground.
Fly spray, I'd get a bottle filled with water and spray him till he holds still.
Trample when you lead, get a whips and get him the heck off of you.
Attacks for treats? Don't give treats .
equinegirl26 likes this.
     
    11-11-2012, 01:11 AM
  #4
Foal
Thanks I thought about the bottle of water I just wasnt sure if it would work or not. Do you guys know how to cure a horse of waterphobia? He will not go anywhere near water puddles... Its bad he completely freaks when you bring him near them.
     
    11-11-2012, 01:18 AM
  #5
Yearling
For water puddles - overfill your water trough. He'll have to walk through to get a drink. I overfill my tanks and none of mine have ever had issues with mud puddles. Of course, I live in Colorado in a high desert, so we don't have many puddles around here :)
     
    11-11-2012, 11:01 AM
  #6
Yearling
If you bathe him he has to stand in his puddle
     
    11-11-2012, 11:06 AM
  #7
Yearling
Most of the time water puddles are so threatening because horses don't have depth perception. For all he knows that puddle could be the deepest body of water in the world. It will be a LOT easier if you can get another horse to go through it first so he can get a feel for how deep the puddle is. I have a mare who will not walk through puddles at home on the trail however she will follow my best friends mare into their pond to go swimming any day!
loosie and Wallaby like this.
     
    11-11-2012, 01:28 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Janna    
Your training Him but don't know what to do?

Rearing I just let a horse meet the ground.
Fly spray, I'd get a bottle filled with water and spray him till he holds still.
Trample when you lead, get a whips and get him the heck off of you.
Attacks for treats? Don't give treats .
i second this. It took me two hours and a drenched but my mare never moved again when I brought a spray bottle out. As for like a water hose. Start on his legs. Don't remove the water on his legs till he stands still. Gradually move your way up. If he moves keep the water on him. Teach him he can't run from it. Same with the fly spray . If he begs for treats or gets in your space then just fo away with them all together horses don't need treats. Nor do dogs or cats. As soon as he takes one step back relieve pressure IMMEDIATELY. If he still rears put some driving reins on him and try if from the ground. If he rears and meets the dirt so be it. Its a consequence to his action but make sure he knows how to back on the ground first. If he don't know how to back with you on the ground he won't know undersaddle
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    11-12-2012, 08:30 AM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by dressagegirl145    
*Rearing when we back up*
More information? Why is he rearing? Is he physically finding it difficult for some reason? Is he afraid of the pressure? Are you putting too much pressure on him &/or not releasing instantly for his 'good' attempts? Is he saying 'you & who's army'? Is he just confused with however you've 'trained' him? Assuming you're being clear & he's learned how to *yield* to pressure without fear, I'd just keep the pressure on & ignore the rearing until he tries a backward step. If the rearing doesn't work for him(make your pressure quit) and stepping back does, that's what you'll get.

I am assuming you're talking about rearing while you're on the ground, not while ridden. If he rears at rein pressure while ridden, I'd rule out physical probs like teeth, sore back, etc and especially as he doesn't lead well yet by the sounds, get him reliably yielding to pressure in all ways on the ground first in a halter, before doing same on his back, before using a bit.

Quote:
*Freaking out with fly spray*
*Freaking out around dogs*
I disagree *generally* with the 'flooding' approach - that is, force him to just put up with it until he quits being reactive. This can work, but it can also just cause a horse to 'shut down' mentally from too much pressure, as well as damaging any trust he may have in you. Instead get him trusting of you & your 'toys' with 'approach & retreat' tactics, so he learns you'll be considerate of his fears & look out for him. Start at whatever 'level' he can handle - eg. Get him confident spraying 1-2m away from him, before getting closer & 'whoops, I squirted you a bit but now it's gone... until he's confident with that before doing it more/longer, whatever. With dogs for eg. You could lead him past barking dogs at whatever distance that he was mildly worried, backwards & forwards, until he's blase about it, before repeating the exercise closer up.

Quote:
*Attemting to trample you when you lead him*
Again more info as to why, as if he's doing it in fear or confusion, I'd treat it a lot differently to if he were 'bullying' you.

Quote:
*Attacking you for treats*
Sounds like he needs some basic manners first. In the meantime, if you must give him treats, keep a fence between you to prevent his 'mugging' so you can *consistently & safely* reinforce him with a treat ONLY for 'good' behaviour & ensure the mugging etc NEVER EVER works. Be consistent.

Quote:
He now trusts me so much that he will just follow me around without lead or anything. I think I must have done join up correctly. One day we were just walking around and all of a sudden this dog came running up and barking outside the arena and he backed ran forward and reared.
With respect, following you around doesn't mean he trusts you and it sounds like he may not, sorry. I don't think 'join up' is an exercise that promotes trust particularly. Running forward & rearing at the dog also sounds like he wasn't frightened(tho the initial backup may have been due to him being startled), but sounds like he may have been challenging/threatening the dog - trying to run it off but there was a fence in the way.

I would suggest finding an experienced trainer to help teach you how to work with him more effectively.
PunksTank likes this.
     
    11-12-2012, 08:55 AM
  #10
Showing
By trample you I gather you mean he knocks you with his shoulder? In part he responds to you because you have treats. On the other hand he is not respecting your space. Take a 4' stick and draw a circle in the dirt with your arm held straight that encircles you. Take a good look. He is not allowed to put even his head in that space. This means you will have to consistently move him to keep him out. Use that stick or riding crop to tap him on the chest as you back him with the lead. The tapping isn't to hurt but just be unpleasant. He will get so you barely have to move it. Now when you offer a treat, you are to go in to his space so make him back away first, then you approach him but only when he'll remain standing. Be sure to stretch your arm so he has to turn his head away for the treat. He will learn that there are none to be had if he mugs you. Don't think when he mugs for treats that this is a sign of affection or love.
     

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