Perfect colt? Sorry so long. - The Horse Forum

 
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-14-2009, 04:35 PM Thread Starter
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Perfect colt? Sorry so long.

Has anyone ever had a "perfect" colt? What I mean is everything I ask my two year old to do, even for the first time, he does. First time I went to lunge him, he did it perfect, first time I put a saddle on him, he literally didn't bat an eye or flick an ear.

Let me explain how I went about saddling him; I put him in the roundpen, did about two minutes of lunging and flopping the rope on him, threw (I mean THREW) the saddle pad on, threw the heavy western saddle with all the "stuff" on it on, tossed the girth, back girth and breastcollar over the side, reached under his belly and tightened the girth, than the back girth, than did up the breast collar. Than I proceeded to flop the stirrups as absolutely hard as I possibly could, I jerked the back girth up on his belly, wopped the seat of the saddle. He never raised his head, flicked an ear, flinched in anyway. I sent him off on the rope, hoping if he started trotting and feeling all of this he would have some sort of reaction but he never did. Eventually, he turned his head around and tried to nibble on the stirrup. That is it.

I have started a lot of well behaved colts, but all of them had some type of reaction to being saddled the first time, no matter how well prepared before hand. I have barely worked with this colt and nothing. I will say that with anyone else, he gets a tad nervous. So maybe he just trusts me so much he isn't worried. I don't know. The way I fiqure it is either someone snuck in and drugged my horse or I am Super Trainer. Just kidding.

Has this happened to anyone else before??

Don't squat with yer spurs on!
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post #2 of 9 Old 01-14-2009, 05:43 PM
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I've had it happen with other colts, but I'm not particularly fond of it. It usually means one of two things--the horse is dull, or the horse is going to explode at a later date. Usually colts with a bit of fight in them make the best mounts, because they're sensitive enough for high competition.

If he's destined to be a trail horse, though, they're usually the best kind.

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post #3 of 9 Old 01-14-2009, 06:20 PM
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My own colt was/is that way. I had him tied loosely to the barn side and tossed the saddle at him. He never flinched or budged and still doesn't. I love it, because even though he doesn't mind it, he's still a very attentive horse and is very willing. I think a lot of it is how the horse was raised. My colt has never known anything but love and affection and he takes everything in stride believing that it won't hurt him.

Horseshoe Loop Farm: Home of Gypsie (22 y/o TWH mare), Dakota (10 y/o TWH gelding) & Codie (18 y/o Walkaloosa gelding)
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post #4 of 9 Old 01-15-2009, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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Well, this colt is anything but dull. He has more personality than most horses and LOVES to move. I'm sure he has the potential to go far.

So maybe he'll explode later when I start riding him, or maybe he just has a good head on him. I don't know, I guess we will see. I'll be getting on him soon so wish me luck!

Don't squat with yer spurs on!
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post #5 of 9 Old 01-15-2009, 12:24 PM
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Good luck! Lol.

When I first got on my boy, I was worried he'd be like his dam had been to train... wanting to buck and all, but he never did... According to his sires owner, my boy is just like his sire... very level headed an all. Lol.

I hope your expectations are met when you get on your boy!

Horseshoe Loop Farm: Home of Gypsie (22 y/o TWH mare), Dakota (10 y/o TWH gelding) & Codie (18 y/o Walkaloosa gelding)
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post #6 of 9 Old 01-15-2009, 03:47 PM
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TC- this has nothing to do with your post, but your boy is too cute!!
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post #7 of 9 Old 01-15-2009, 05:16 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks! And he has a personality to match his looks.

Don't squat with yer spurs on!
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post #8 of 9 Old 01-16-2009, 12:41 AM
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My gelding was awesome to break. Perfect in fact. He had no adverse reaction to anything I threw at him, I figure this is because of the amount of time I took to introduce each new step. Even when I first got on him, no buck or anything. Lol, all that was just to fool me into thinking he would be a breeze throughout training. Now undersaddle he is a bit difficult.
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post #9 of 9 Old 01-19-2009, 03:17 PM
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This guy sounds like the gelding I had a few years ago. I was working for a backyard breeder who had about 35 horses all told. The year this colt was two, there were 8 two year olds and 3 three year old that I was working with, plus a full time job on the side. So when the time came to start getting them under saddle, I was a little bit rushed. We had had to move all the horses because the farm we were leasing was sold out from under us, so that particular year group had been a little short changed on their halter training to start out with. When I brought this colt and his buddy out of the big pasture into one of the smaller paddocks towards the front so I could work him, he would mostly lead when you tugged on the lead rope. In under two weeks, the little sucker would lead, lounge, tie, ground tie, didn't bat an eye when I saddled him the first time and I was able to out the first two rides on him. Since he had done so well, he kinda got put on the back burner while I worked some on the other youngsters. About two months later, a guy came to the farm looking to buy a young horse. He took a liking to the colt and asked me to ride him. I had not had a chance to do anything but feed this colt since the couple of rides two months prior. I pulled him out of the paddock, tacked him up, lounged him for about 15 min and hopped on. He never missed a beat. In fact, where the first two rides had only been walks, I was even able to trot him around without any fuss. Luck for me the guy decided not to buy him and I later was able to trade a pain in the butt filly for him.

He was not the sharpest horse I have ever ridden, but when I sold him, he was working second level dressage, started on reigning, had won ribbons in trail and WP and would jump 2ft.
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