Personal Bubble?!
 
 

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Personal Bubble?!

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  • My horse keeps pushing me with his head
  • Horse pushes me with head

 
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    03-14-2010, 10:01 PM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation Personal Bubble?!

My horse doesnt know what a personal bubble is usually its not to bad but sometimes she pushes me and its in a "joking" way (not mean grr way) but I never just let her do it and she just keeps doing and after every ride she uses me as a "scratching post" and wont stop rubbing her head on me also she wont stand still when she is tied up I personally don't mind but it scares a lot of other people in the barn I know its just her getting bored and ansy oh and she paws the ground when I make her stand still for a few minutes but I don't know how to stop these things can anyone help also what are some good ways to "scold" bad behavior (that she knows is wrong)
     
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    03-14-2010, 11:24 PM
  #2
Weanling
My horse had pushy problems really bad. What I do is (if you have cross ties) leave a lead rope attached to their halter, if they move, reajust them in the cross ties. If they scratch or push on you, push back harder. Their testing their boundaries with you when they do that. Its what they do with the other horses to see how far they can push them. Just strict enough so they learn boundaries, but not violent. My barn also switched my horses fields so he is one of the bottom horses in the food chain to correct this...I hope I helped.

Edit: Oh yeah, and for pawing just tell them to knock it off in a raised voice. They will most likley catch on.
     
    03-15-2010, 01:31 PM
  #3
Trained
Annie is really pushy too. She's actually shoved me over before and I landed in some blackberry thorns...ouch :(

Anyways, what I did to correct her is if I'm just walking her by the lead rope and she tries to push me I will swat her with the end of it, and shake the lead rope to ask her to back up. Once she does, I reward her by petting her neck and then we carry on. She soon figured out that she shouldn't be pushing me around.

Do some personal space excersizes. Practice shaking the lead rope to get the horse backing up. Start with just a little jiggle, then gradually get strogner and by the time your trashing the rope around and she doesn't move, take a step forward like "Back up NOW" and eventually they will realize that to avoid getting Mom mad they should just step back when you jiggle it lightly.

Maybe do some practice moving the hips and forehand away with the rope as well/ Just twirl it around the haunches or forehand and as soon as they pivot away reward them :)
     
    03-15-2010, 02:25 PM
  #4
Foal
Ahh.. sounds just like my old 3 year old gelding.
How old is your horse? If she is really young she might not have a lot of patience when standing tied. My 3 year old gelding had ALL the same issues. With the standing still while tied issue, I would tie him to our trailer, tack area, fence, or wherever & just left him there while I went to work my other horses or muck pastures. This really helped him to accept being tied & that there is no use moving around for nothing... he eventually learned to be patient & that I wont forget about him.
Now, for the whole scratching post thing, if you really don't like that, give her a nice push & back her up a couple steps. If she does it again, repeat. When my gelding did it I didn't mind too much because he wasn't doing it with an attitude or anything.. he was just being silly.
If she is one of those horses who are always crowding into you constantly, I have a good technique you can use. Go buy a long crop, training stick, dressage whip, or something that is a good extension of your arm. Fix your horse up in the halter & lead, grab your whip, & go for a long walk. During your walk, stop your horse. Say whoa & stop in your tracks. If she doesnt stop with you, add halter pressure. Next, reach your arm out with the whip & imagine drawing a huge circle around you the distance of your arm & whip together. That is YOUR bubble. Your horse should not be in that space. If she is, push her out of it. Don't use the halter, use the whip. With rhythm, smack her chest until she moves out of your bubble. If she is not responding increase the pressure of the smacks every four hits until she moves back. Keep repeating: Walk, stop, back her out of your bubble (If she is in it) & repeat. Eventually, when you stop she should stop immediatly with you & out of your personal space. Some horses take to this pretty fast.
Take your time, be patient, & consistant.
     
    03-15-2010, 02:40 PM
  #5
Banned
I correct a horse that won't stand still in cross ties with a swift knee in the rib cage. I get a horse that paws I step into the horse, a sharp lift of the knee in the rib cage and say STand UP.
It fixes them in short order.
That said I watch boarders all the time with older horse stand there with a whip threatening and for the minute it might do some good but before long the horse is back to pawing and being a pain.
I never allow the horse to rub his head on me, never. If he tied a quick elbow in the chops keeps him in his space.
I know is sounds rough but I don't spend time threatening the horse, dealing with crap and they learn right off to stand still and keep to their space. I don't threaten, I do.

Any animal is better off if it knows is boundaries , what it can and can not cross. We are both happier because of it.
     
    03-15-2010, 02:42 PM
  #6
Yearling
My horse was never pushy or anything like that, but what really bugged me was that when I walked away from her and she followed me, she would be right up my back and I could feel her whiskers on me. I learned this from the Stacy Westfall clinic I went to...what she did when her horse got right up on her was kick her elbows back and she backed up to basically show that she can "kick" too. I find it works really good.
     
    03-16-2010, 12:37 PM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosDad    
I correct a horse that won't stand still in cross ties with a swift knee in the rib cage. I get a horse that paws I step into the horse, a sharp lift of the knee in the rib cage and say STand UP.
It fixes them in short order.
That said I watch boarders all the time with older horse stand there with a whip threatening and for the minute it might do some good but before long the horse is back to pawing and being a pain.
I never allow the horse to rub his head on me, never. If he tied a quick elbow in the chops keeps him in his space.
I know is sounds rough but I don't spend time threatening the horse, dealing with crap and they learn right off to stand still and keep to their space. I don't threaten, I do.

Any animal is better off if it knows is boundaries , what it can and can not cross. We are both happier because of it.

You're a very harsh person, aren't you? I don't mean offense or anything, but there are better ways to do it. Yeah punish them when they do it but the ribcage is a very sensitive part of the horse. I wouldn't ever knee a horse there. That's a good way to get yourself thrown against the barn wall when he kicks. You can do it in a gentle manner that still shows you are the boss and you will have your way. And they're a lot safer too.
     
    03-16-2010, 04:29 PM
  #8
Trained
I fail to see how a knee to the ribs would get you thrown against the barn wall. I alos disagree with the ribcage being any more sensitive than most other parts of the body. I would guess that it is considerably less sensitive since there is alot of muscle and bones that are designed to flex. If any human can hurt a horse by kneeing it in the ribs then I will walk softly and call him/her 'sir'. I have seen horses get kicked by another horse with both feet in the ribs and it didn't seem to hurt them at all so I am sure that however harsh RD is that he is only causing very temporary discomfort of a type that the horse is acustomed to.
     
    03-16-2010, 04:42 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by PechosGoldenChance    
My horse was never pushy or anything like that, but what really bugged me was that when I walked away from her and she followed me, she would be right up my back and I could feel her whiskers on me. I learned this from the Stacy Westfall clinic I went to...what she did when her horse got right up on her was kick her elbows back and she backed up to basically show that she can "kick" too. I find it works really good.
I saw that clip, too, and used it for my older QH. Worked like a charm after one 'bop'. My 4 yr old does the same thing, follows too close. So I walk with the lunge whip under my arm, the handle end sticking out behind me. If she gets too close, she hits the whip handle. She has great respect for the lunge whip, apparently, and she backs right off! I have heard people kick straight back when their horse gets too close, too. But the flailing elbow works really well!
     
    03-16-2010, 04:47 PM
  #10
Yearling
Gold: Yea I love it! She rarely does it now, but every now and again, she will and I just have to remind her and she backs off. Glad you liked it too!
     

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