plastic bags - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

plastic bags

This is a discussion on plastic bags within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        03-05-2009, 12:57 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    Depends On How a Horse Sees It : Horse Science News

    Nifty article by Horse Science News, on this matter.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        03-05-2009, 01:35 PM
      #12
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shmurmer4    
    Depends On How a Horse Sees It : Horse Science News

    Nifty article by Horse Science News, on this matter.
    For my guy - it's not sight - it's the sound.

    No matter what though - not every horse responds the same to any training method. One thing might work well for one horse but the same procedure make cause another horse to come unglued. I will also add it does not mean the horse was 'abused' because it will be nervous or upset about something.

    It's very important to take an individual approach to horses and not try to put them in a mold.
         
        03-05-2009, 01:46 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    For my guy - it's not sight - it's the sound.

    No matter what though - not every horse responds the same to any training method. One thing might work well for one horse but the same procedure make cause another horse to come unglued. I will also add it does not mean the horse was 'abused' because it will be nervous or upset about something.

    It's very important to take an individual approach to horses and not try to put them in a mold.
    That is so true!! I've worked with horses that are terrified of the sound of a plastic bag. I find it is more the sound than the sight. And, yes, horses are so different. What works for one sometimes won't work at all for another. It is very important to find out what works best for the particular horse you have or are working with.
         
        03-05-2009, 02:03 PM
      #14
    Trained
    In an effort to desensitize to plastic bags and other things I used a plastic, push in the ground type fence post. Like this:



    And tied new things to it for the horses to investigate. I put the post in the middle of the pen and attached the "new things" to the post, the horse could then investigate it at their own pace.

    I tied plastic bags that would blow in the wind, black garbage bags, sleigh bells, a piece of an old tarp, a hula hoop with the rattle beads, milk jugs, 2 ltr pop bottles, even some pop cans. Anything you want them to get familiar with that won't hurt them.

    I would leave the "New item" on my "introduction stick" for a few days and let the horses get used to it. The items couldn't chase them, the horses had plenty of room to get away from it, and more than anything, it gave them something to think about. The more items I put on the post the faster they got used to them...the stick turned from the scary post to the discovery stick. I LOVE letting a horse figure out anything that they can possibly learn on their own...( I mean if they can learn to be ok with it on their own that's better IMO than forcing something on them, not all principles apply here)

    Once they were OK with the object, I'd rub it on them, by the time we got to that step they didn't care much anymore.
         
        03-05-2009, 03:43 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Maybe you're not doing it correctly. :)
         
        03-05-2009, 05:58 PM
      #16
    Showing
    I really like Dumas' approach. That way you are not forcing the scary object on the horse. However, that is not how I do things. At the risk of being critisized, I am one of the types of people who "sack out" a horse, but not in the traditional way. If they jump when I throw the saddle pad on their back, I take it off and throw it back up there over and over until they stand still and don't flinch. That is just how I do my training, but I have been around horses enough and trained enough of them that I understand what they can take and what they cannot. There is a very fine line between spooked and terrorized that, sadly, most people cannot distinguish. With the air of friendly debate, Spirithorse, sacking out teaches a horse more than "tolerance" of a scary object. Done properly, it is a quick and easy way to teach them that the scary object will not hurt them and they have nothing to fear from it. Teaching them confidence in themselves and in you.

    As for the OP, I would also advise that you don't do that again. Even contained in a round pen, she could slip and hurt herself or charge and hurt you. Above all, I believe you must never allow the horse to run loose under saddle at any time during the training process. If they get scared or start to buck, you have absolutely no control over what they do. I would just take the bag into a pen with me and have her unsaddled with a halter and lead. Keep the bag in your hand where she can see it and just let her trot circles around you until she stops. Work your way closer to her every time she stops and let her sniff the bag if she is willing. Sometimes this will take a bit of time but just stay consistent.
         
        03-05-2009, 09:01 PM
      #17
    Trained
    SMrobs, I completely agree with you about the tack (saddle pad). You have to be able to read a horses' tolerance level. I don't use the fence post for tack or blankets, just the fun weird stuff.

    You'll receive no criticism from me.
         

    Tags
    plastic bag, round pen

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    The Plastic Bag and Free Lunging BurningAmber520 Horse Videos 1 01-31-2009 11:28 PM
    Water Tanks - Metal or Plastic mnprairieman Horse Tack and Equipment 9 01-15-2009 07:17 PM
    Saddle bags -- likes and dislikes NorthernMama Horse Tack and Equipment 10 08-18-2008 02:10 PM
    Tail bags made easy!!! imaREINER Tack and Equipment Classifieds 0 06-25-2008 07:57 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:01 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0