"Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on. - Page 18
   

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"Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on.

This is a discussion on "Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Horse ring sour no impulsion
  • How do you lunge a horse that hasn't got a clue

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    05-23-2012, 02:08 PM
  #171
Foal
A green horse for a green rider :/

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
I have owned and worked with horses for over 50 years now because at the age of 11 I knew when to give up. After learning and excelling on a real genuine pony my grandfather thought I was better than I was and bought me a very green bigger pony that took advantage on the ground and under saddle. He was mean spirited and had a tendency to bolt. Thank God my mother was wise enough to tell me that I wasn't a failure just over-horsed for the experience I had. My next pony was perfect - just challenging enough to take me to the next level and the one after that I broke myself when I was 14 and she became a wonderful ride. Since then I've had some really difficult horses that other people have given up with and turned them around but I've never lost sight of my limitations. Nowadays I know that my joints make me far less agile than I used to be and if I fall I'm probably going to break a lot easier so I know in my head that the horse I'm probably looking longingly at is not the one for me any more. Never lose sight of the fact that we are supposed to be doing this stuff for fun, to enjoy it. That problem horse you may be feeling guilty about isn't going to worry about hurting you badly or even killing you, there is no shame in giving up and moving on. There are lots of kind forgiving horses out there that won't take advantage of your mistakes and weaknesses.

Your post made me think of this saying:
"green on green, makes black and blue". I think this is one of my favorite quotes :) My husband likes to say it all the time lol. That's the first thing I think of when we go to a 4-h show and a parent has bought their green riding kid a green horse so they can "grow" together. It normally always ends in a disaster. I'm happy your parents knew what was "too much" for you and got you something you could learn on. That's a happy story :) Thanks for sharing..
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    05-23-2012, 04:11 PM
  #172
rob
Weanling
Before you send the horse home,give it a week off.then call the owner over to feed,brush,saddle and ride the horse to see how well they get along .
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    05-25-2012, 10:48 PM
  #173
Foal
Awesome. That is a great story, and gives hope to others.
It shows yet again that success/failure is a 2 sided coin.. It depends on which way you look at it..
Happy Training :)
     
    05-28-2012, 01:39 AM
  #174
Weanling
I have been debating Weather or not I should get rid of my 4 year old That I had to train myself & get a horse that I could be competeing on already.
My Horse doesnt have any big issues besides Not wanting to lunge & wanting to graze when he's ridden in grass besides that he's pretty good.
My parents say I need to stick with him.

Not Saying I Disagree with your post But Most Horseman I have talked to say they became good riders/trainers from the Horses that were too much for them.
     
    05-28-2012, 02:30 AM
  #175
Foal
... took a mare on trial from a dealer. She had many wins in western pleasure - not my thing at all, I'd never even done any western riding - but she was sweet and lovely, had wonderful extravagant paces and elevation on the lunge and I thought it could work - how wrong I was. Under saddle all she knew was how to go round and round the ring with her head almost on the floor, barely any contact with her mouth, to me no impulsion and worse still she had been taught to spur stop so sometimes my command for pick up speed would deliver an immediate stop from whatever pace we were at. She was essentially a robotised horse, if you took her away from the ring she hadn't a clue what to do, the ultimate one trick pony that could do her part piece to total perfection and if you asked anything else she would panic in confusion at thinking she was getting something wrong. .[/QUOTE]

I nearly cried reading this. My heart goes out to this poor mare, I can't help wondering what kind of 'training' she suffered to have become so 'robotised' and afraid to try new things.
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    05-29-2012, 02:38 PM
  #176
Super Moderator
unsuitable for rider

That is a really sad story because that mare is never going to be what the lady wants yet could be a wonderful horse for the right person, she may not even get the chance. From experience if they start out a bit on the smart but fizzy side they stay like it for a very long time, they just don't keep it up for so long!!! Maybe you can just hang around and pick up the pieces when she realises that its not the one for her. I know a woman who bought a stunning gelding who was super at his job but she was no way the rider that she sold herself to be - very nervous and loose in the saddle. The horse had a buck now and again - nothing bad just high spirits and every time it happened she fell off but instead of blaming her own weak riding blamed the horse and said it was dangerous and as she couldn't handle it no one else would be able too - tragic end - she had it shot. I give up with people sometimes.
However I am a very happy person today as my latest mare of one year now has just stood as good as gold to have her shots, tests and dental work done. A year ago when the same work was done a month after I got her she had a massive panic attack and tried to kill us all, today like a different horse and I've not had to chase her round the paddock or hit her or anything else like that to get her respect or desensitize her. Just day to day fair but firm handling to win her trust but in the wrong hands it would have been a very different story
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    05-30-2012, 09:13 AM
  #177
Super Moderator
stick or give up

Quote:
Originally Posted by SplashedOvero    
I have been debating Weather or not I should get rid of my 4 year old That I had to train myself & get a horse that I could be competeing on already.
My Horse doesnt have any big issues besides Not wanting to lunge & wanting to graze when he's ridden in grass besides that he's pretty good.
My parents say I need to stick with him.

Not Saying I Disagree with your post But Most Horseman I have talked to say they became good riders/trainers from the Horses that were too much for them.
You don't say how old you are or how much experience you have or what you aim to do so its hard to say. Generally speaking its not a good idea to have a green horse and a novice rider together - its what they describe as 'the blind the leading the blind' and you would get more confidence from a horse that already knew the job and then move on to one that needed training. Most of the top showjumpers start out on pricey hand picked schoolmasters and progress from there, same with dressage horses.
Your horse doesn't sound too challenging but he is already 'trying it on a bit with you, maybe you could spend some time and money with a good trainer to get you both through any teething troubles
At the end of the day its you that's going to be riding him not your parents and if you're not having fun then they need to realise that because all the time you're wasting struggling with a green horse you could be having a wonderful time with a well trained horse.
Its this saying 'what doesn't kill you makes you stronger' that these 'horsemen' are referring too and though that works for some people there are many many more that usually just give up because their confidence gets too knocked back. The word 'kill; might be a bit strong but I've seen some pretty horrific accidents over the years. There's a huge difference between a horse that's well trained but has to be ridden - rather than a ploddy old thing that does it all for you - and a totally green horse that hasn't got a clue, because if you haven't got a clue either how on earth are you going to educate him
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    05-30-2012, 06:07 PM
  #178
Foal
Green on green, makes black and blue...love that
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    06-04-2012, 12:10 AM
  #179
Weanling
I started Riding on a 25 year old mare who couldn't canter and had to be constantly rested, occasionally medicated, and kept on joint supplements to stay sound. I just peddled around the block and up and down the road on her, I had the time of my life. After 2 years of riding her I wanted to move up to something that could canter and could possibly show a little on. My mom bought me a 10 year old AQHA Registered show horse who needed a confident rider and was ring sour. He was the example of how not to buy a horse. The trainer we know and trust trained the horse when it was 5 and had not seen the horse for 5 years. When the horse came up for sale he said 'I remember this horse, he is really nice." and we bought him, never tried him, never even saw him until we went to pick him up. When we would ride in an empty arena we were fine, but take him on the trail or ride in an arena with more then 1 or 2 other horses and he bucked, reared, bolted, you name it he did it. After a week of training where we were doing great and went to a 4-H ride and he bolted 3 times, bucked me off twice, and then bucked me off and knocked me out for several minutes. We sold him, he went to a show home with an experienced rider who wanted to go to the top and he is doing great.
Then we went through a rescue and looked at several horses, the first turned out to have a stifle injury, the second turned out completely loco, the third turned out to have a hock injury.
We thought we had hit the jackpot with the fourth a white Appaloosa mare, she was beautiful, when I road her for the first couple months I knew she didn't like to stop but would with a little bit of coaxing, but as I kept riding her she started rearing and went over 3 times. She does fine with more confident riders but ever since what I have called the 'big, black show horse incedent' I have been terrified and when she started rearing I was scared to death to get back on her, which didn't help. We are probably selling her once her foal is weaned (when we adopted her she was apparently bred) unless she completely turns around and becomes a perfect horse and I plan on continuing to work with the foal and debate on whether or not to sell the foal once she is completely halter broke.
     
    06-06-2012, 11:13 AM
  #180
Super Moderator
getting the right horse

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eclipse295    
I started Riding on a 25 year old mare who couldn't canter and had to be constantly rested, occasionally medicated, and kept on joint supplements to stay sound. I just peddled around the block and up and down the road on her, I had the time of my life. After 2 years of riding her I wanted to move up to something that could canter and could possibly show a little on. My mom bought me a 10 year old AQHA Registered show horse who needed a confident rider and was ring sour. He was the example of how not to buy a horse. The trainer we know and trust trained the horse when it was 5 and had not seen the horse for 5 years. When the horse came up for sale he said 'I remember this horse, he is really nice." and we bought him, never tried him, never even saw him until we went to pick him up. When we would ride in an empty arena we were fine, but take him on the trail or ride in an arena with more then 1 or 2 other horses and he bucked, reared, bolted, you name it he did it. After a week of training where we were doing great and went to a 4-H ride and he bolted 3 times, bucked me off twice, and then bucked me off and knocked me out for several minutes. We sold him, he went to a show home with an experienced rider who wanted to go to the top and he is doing great.
Then we went through a rescue and looked at several horses, the first turned out to have a stifle injury, the second turned out completely loco, the third turned out to have a hock injury.
We thought we had hit the jackpot with the fourth a white Appaloosa mare, she was beautiful, when I road her for the first couple months I knew she didn't like to stop but would with a little bit of coaxing, but as I kept riding her she started rearing and went over 3 times. She does fine with more confident riders but ever since what I have called the 'big, black show horse incedent' I have been terrified and when she started rearing I was scared to death to get back on her, which didn't help. We are probably selling her once her foal is weaned (when we adopted her she was apparently bred) unless she completely turns around and becomes a perfect horse and I plan on continuing to work with the foal and debate on whether or not to sell the foal once she is completely halter broke.
I feel so sorry for you because you seem to be having a really tough time finding the right one for you. At least you have the good sense to know when to quit and move on.
I'm not going to tell you to keep this infoal mare because there are so many pitfalls in raising a foal and it can cost you so much money. They start out all cute and cuddly then all of a sudden they are like a toddler in the terrible 2 phase except that if you get it wrong it lasts forever or until some more experienced steps in to take over.
Rescue horses are most often in kill pens or sold cheap at auctions for a good reason - they have a serious unsoundness or a serious problem. Do you know a reputable dealer who would take the mare off you in part exchange for a solid reliable animal? Try to buy or even loan your next horse by finding one that is recommended to you by someone you trust and knows what your 'comfort zone' is. I do wish you luck but right now I'm not seeing a happy ending to your current situation.
     

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