"Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on. - Page 23
 
 

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"Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on.

This is a discussion on "Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        06-13-2014, 12:37 PM
      #221
    Foal
    I grew up with horses and feel I know how to ride and handle them very well. I hate when people use the terms intermediate and such because each horse is different just like each type of riding is different.
    But I had to admit last fall that a horse was too much for me. I only had her a few months but I know that sometimes no matter how good and how much time you spend with horses there can always be that one horse that is beyond you.
         
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        06-21-2014, 05:46 PM
      #222
    Foal
    I have this Paso Mare, she was abused and I am working with her. I am already more than half in love with her but I've already told many... If I am unable to give her what she needs am able to help her I will not be greedy nor selfish... I will find someone who can. If they can't I will find someone who will allow her to live out the rest of her life as a girl of leisure if necessary. I would never hang onto a horse that I am unable to train properly and/or work appropriately. My soon to be son in law has a massive 3 year old registered paint gelding... green, spoiled and was raised as a pet. They want me to work him too. I've been balking on him because he is 15.5. When they mount him he starts to run off... dangerous. They want me to work him. I'm 49 and barely 5'6", I can't even get my foot in the stirrup when he is saddled and if I have trouble doing that I am not going to work this giant lap horse. I've told them they should sell him to someone who will turn him into the amazing horse he is capable of being... they are balking on that. Luckily, I have lots of horsey friends some possibly willing to train in exchange for leasing him. We'll see what happens.......
         
        06-22-2014, 08:56 PM
      #223
    Weanling
    I'm 16 and bought my first horse 6 months ago. She was drugged. Went crazy after we brought her to a barn closer to us. Bucking, rearing, bolting, kicking, bitting, attacking people, running through fences. Later found out she was untouched until she was 5 years old. Unprofessionally started, than ran on barrels with no training.

    I had several people try working with her, no improvement. I cried a lot because I felt trapped. Tried selling her but I could never sell her to anyone that was interested.

    So I sent her to a trainer highly recommended by several friends. Got her back 43 days later no different than she was before, 300 lbs underweight and sick. Its my $655 regret plus the $340 vet bill. :(

    Finally I found a trainer that comes out to my barn twice a week and teaches me how to work with her. She has only been out 3 times and the difference is amazing. So amazing that I even brought her to 4h horse camp this weekend!!!!

    Buying and keeping her was stupid and I could have been killed. But I don't regret it. That horse has taught me so much and has to made me a better rider.

    She still has a long ways to go. In 6 months I have already invested $1200 into her training. But im getting a lot out of it. And we have a strong bond because of it
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        07-23-2014, 06:17 AM
      #224
    Foal
    I got my first horse when I was 13 and she was a mess. She had a lot of problems and needed lots of care and attentions. We took her in because her owner was moving away and had completely neglected her and if she could not find a home, she would be left to waist away in a paddock full of cows for the rest of her life. Of course, for the first month it was impossible to get near her and it took a good half hour to catch her. She was so flighty on the lead and lunge line and panicy under saddle. We had her visited by a chyropractor twice (having her third and final in a few weeks) and a lot of her problems faded substantially. I continued to work with her and train her up. At one point, I found myself tearfully writing up a draft add for the local news paper but, as I'm sure a lot will say, I stupidly backed out. But I'm so glad that I carried on.
    Now, I'm 15 years old and my pony is as happy and healthy as she has ever been! No more chasing around the paddock and troublesome leading. She now either approaches me or waits calmly for me to easily pop the halter on, or even sling my jacket around her neck, and lead her on. Most if the time, I don't need to hold her, she just follows. She's the most well behaved and cooperative horse during ground work and does everything without hesitation. Under saddle, she is a calm, happy little girl. When I first got her, I wouldn't even ride her outside of the round yard. Now I can comfortably ride bareback in the open pasture.
    While, like any horse you come across, she has the odd buck or puts her ears back but she has never once bitten or kicked. While it took some time to get her cheeky riding habits under control, we managed to do it. Trial and error. I thought about what I was doing wrong and what I could change. Eventually, I worked out her buttons and we understand.
    I feel like there can be a lot of age discrimination when it comes to this. Not every teenager is hopeless and incapable. And yes, while I was reluctant to let her go when I felt it was time, I still managed to gain an amazing little pony and I only have 6 - 7 years of experience under my belt. But I feel it's for that reason that I can admit my wrong doings as my methods are not cemented into my routine. I don't know, just my opinion.

    If it weren't for Pippa, I wouldn't be half the horse person I am today. She taught me so much and it's been such a valuable experience. I wouldn't call her a bombproof beginners horse by any means but it shows what people can do when your mind is in the right place.
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