"Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on. - Page 3
 
 

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"Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on.

This is a discussion on "Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Is a just broken pony suitable for a child

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    03-21-2010, 12:26 PM
  #21
Weanling
Excellent article!

Great Article!

Everyone who owns a horse should read this. Maybe it will make a few people ask themselves if their horse is actually right for them.

My trainer has worked with many of these horses that inexperienced people have ruined. Currently I am helping her re-train a 13 year old horse that doesn't respond to leg pressure and rein aids because of a teen that wasn't experienced enough to ride her and just totally ruined her.

These children that get horses that are way to green or problematic are not the only people at fault for ruining their horse. It is also the child's parents that need to be blamed. Just because the child had lessons on push-button ponies for a year or two, doesn't mean they are ready to break in a young horse or ride a top-notch dressage horse.
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    03-21-2010, 07:20 PM
  #22
Trained
Okay, back at a computer again :]

Often, if a person is way-over horsed, people telling them that can make the situation worse. We all know how people like to prove others wrong! They get into the ‘I’ll show them’ mentality – Which as said, is when people start getting hurt.

I think a big point to make is that you should be training for the horse. Anytime you are training for a different motivation is when things go pear shaped. Training to prove something to others, or to yourself, is one of the worst.

I think that being over horsed is one of the biggest reasons people lose interest in riding. I have a friend who never had that pony to learn and have fun on. She had a cranky, pushy, dominant horse, and then a highly strung, injury prone TB. She slowly stopped riding when he was always injured, and when he passed away, she never really took it up again. I used to bring her out and put her on Wildey, and she had such fun just hooning around! It was something she had never experienced – Just having fun on a horse you don’t have to worry about. So many young people out there are so focussed on competeing, or training, or improving, or ‘being’ someone, that they lose the pure and simple joy of just riding and enjoying the country with your horse. I feel that every kid should have at least one well-broke pony who they just take out on trails.

Ego is such a big player in the problem. It’s a rare person who can admit that they aren’t good enough, without feeling de-valued even in the smallest way. It feels like failure. And none of us like failure. It’s a mentality that needs to be changed. All those books and movies (Black Beauty, Black Stallion, My Friend Flicka, Thunderhead, etc.) have a lot to answer for! We need to teach our kids the value in realizing you are over horsed and admitting it. We need to teach the parents, too – How many times have I seen a kid who just wants a pony to love, perched on a huge, spirited horse that is terrifying them while their parents scream instructions from the sidelines? There is nothing noble in struggling with a horse that is too much for you.

I think a part that most overlook is that it is doing the horse NO GOOD. If you are scared, confused, or worried, then the horse knows it. It’s like Riosdad days – He rides the horses he does and does things the way he does because he knows that he can control the horse in any situation that may arise. It really is the key. If you don’t have the tools, knowledge and confidence to control and manage any situation that may come up with a particular horse, or a quick and easy avenue to get it, then you have NO business riding that horse.

I am one of those people who hates to see a good horse go to waste. I know that said horse is probably perfectly happy in their life of laziness, but I just start to fume when I see a horse with such potential being wasted because the owner is to scared or doesn’t have the knowledge to bring it out, but they are too stubborn to let it go. There are two horses like this at the local agistment centre – A gorgeous, beautifully conformed 16h palomino ASH gelding and an adorable, lightning quick paint welsh mountain pony mare. The gelding does nothing because the owner doesn’t like him and he is apparently a ‘terror’ – I have ridden him and he didn’t put a foot wrong except for being lazy! The mare is too much for her owner (A typical quick, smart pony mare, the type I love!) and is sitting in the paddock almost foundering every year. Every time I see them I just pine for them – I have said to both owners that I would love to take them but they are too stubborn.

I feel more pity for the horse in these situations, than the owner. The horse has no say in who buys it and who attempts to train it – The people do.
     
    03-21-2010, 07:20 PM
  #23
Banned
I'm going to play devil's advocate here a bit...not that I disagree with the OP.

As the superior species *cough gag*, it behooves us to actually do the research before delving into horse ownership (among other things), get a mentor, talk to more experienced people (like more than just your neighbor who never actually rides his horse) et al...

If people did that BEFORE buying, the chances of getting in over their head goes down exponentially.

Behavior issues in horses are almost always human created, and the behavior in and of itself is the horse's only way to say, "HEY! I'm in pain here. HEY! I don't have a clue what you want from me. HEY! Quit giving me mixed signals. HEY! Why are you reprimanding me for behaving like a horse?" HEY! Why are you getting on me and making me work for 4 hours when you haven't been on me in 6 months? HEY! Don't you get that what you're feeding me is crap and upsetting my stomach?" And the like...

As often as people are bamboozled and taken for a ride by dishonest sellers, there are as many people who simply don't make the commitment that is required for horse ownership, and there is in fact absolutely nothing wrong with that horse that just bit them.
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    03-21-2010, 07:28 PM
  #24
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercedes    
I'm going to play devil's advocate here a bit...not that I disagree with the OP.

As the superior species *cough gag*, it behooves us to actually do the research before delving into horse ownership (among other things), get a mentor, talk to more experienced people (like more than just your neighbor who never actually rides his horse) et al...

If people did that BEFORE buying, the chances of getting in over their head goes down exponentially.

Behavior issues in horses are almost always human created, and the behavior in and of itself is the horse's only way to say, "HEY! I'm in pain here. HEY! I don't have a clue what you want from me. HEY! Quit giving me mixed signals. HEY! Why are you reprimanding me for behaving like a horse?" HEY! Why are you getting on me and making me work for 4 hours when you haven't been on me in 6 months? HEY! Don't you get that what you're feeding me is crap and upsetting my stomach?" And the like...

As often as people are bamboozled and taken for a ride by dishonest sellers, there are as many people who simply don't make the commitment that is required for horse ownership, and there is in fact absolutely nothing wrong with that horse that just bit them.
Excellent point. I don't think there's anything wrong with rising to the occasion of owning a certain horse, and definitely nothing wrong with educationg yourself. However, I think the OP was, as stated somewhere else in this topic, referring especially to the "tweenies" who barely know how to sit on a horse, and then going out and buy something that it would take them years to learn how to successfully ride, and only 6 months or so to ruin.
     
    03-21-2010, 08:43 PM
  #25
Showing
Thank you for your input, WS.

Mercedes, you bring up a valid point, and one that's very oft ignored. The point of my OP, though, was for those people that are already in the situation -- I could write another huge long article about what not to do about getting into the situation in the first place, but thank you for bringing it up :)

Justsam - I'm really gearing this thread to anyone in over their heads, I hate to aim it at only one age group.
     
    03-21-2010, 09:28 PM
  #26
Trained
It's more than just teenages that are in over their head. I know of alot of adults that are also in way over their head!!
     
    03-21-2010, 09:47 PM
  #27
Banned
What a novel! I only read the first part, but wow. That is a great post! And I am one of those people who have/had a choice like that. I chose to get the pride out of the window and chose my safety. We never had a "bond" anyway. BTW- rearing is a scary thing, and going over backward it something I won't soon forget. I hope Chingaz posts here/reads this.
EDIT
It's not that I'm in over my head THAT far. With the trainer working with us, I could ride him fine, but I can't do gymkhana for at LEAST a year because(in the words of the trainer)" I'd be asking to get hurt". I don't trust him, and he will sense that and then you know what will probably happen.......... So in a sense, I am a bit over my head.
And I'm NOT asking to get hurt.
     
    03-21-2010, 10:15 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by FehrGroundRanch    
It's more than just teenages that are in over their head. I know of alot of adults that are also in way over their head!!
It's DEFINITELY more then just teenagers that get in over their heads! There's a older and experienced dressage lady at my barn who bought a nice laid back (FANCY) WB as a 3 year old from a fantastic breeder. She lessons regularly with a great trainer, very sweet, but tiny and somewhat timid. This sweet 3 y/o grew to be a giant and LAZY 17.3 elephant who learned very quickly how to throw his weight around. While it's not a horribly dangerous situation it's not great. There are a lot of days when she does not ride him, days when she does not enjoy riding him, and a lot of people who have tried to talk to her about selling him and getting something more suitable. But for some reason she has some crazy 'commitment' to this horse. He has the breeding and potential to be VERY successful in the show ring (which she has no desire to do). It just seems like a waste for her to not always enjoy her horse, and for him to not to be used to his potential. But she will own him til the day he dies. WHY?!

When people get a puppy and have no follow through (gives it away when it's not cute anymore, gives it away b/c heaven forbid it chewed something up) it pisses me off. Commit to the training and welfare of your puppy and keep it, it's not a library book. But while an unruly puppy pees on your floor, an unruly horse can kill you. I admit, I often judge people who get dogs and then give them to shelters b/c they don't wnat to take care of it anymore. I COMMEND people who realize the horse isn't right for them and find it a good home.

Thanks JDI, great article!
     
    03-21-2010, 10:26 PM
  #29
Started
I was like that. I was a green rider, I learned on my pony that has been there done that. I trust him with my life along with all my friends and family. Well, when I was 12 my cousin's best friend's dad told me that I needed a big horse and that he had the one for me. Oh boy! I didn't sell my pony(thank god!), never will. I tested this horse, he was a 12yo appy. He was a dream to ride! I walked, troted, cantered, stopped, and backed with ease for our first few months together. I felt I had found my perfect horse. We had a great bond and I trusted him. Then gymkhana season started up... He was previously a western/english pleasure horse and couldn't stand the idea of going fast in an arena. Every single gymkhana he bucked me at least once. Funny thing was it was only in the show arena he was great in my backyard arena and would go without problems down the trail. His name, Tater(Bucking Tater on youtube) yes I was the inexperienced little girl getting bucked and reared with, I know it looked like I was causing it but I wasnt he is really just a bucker. I finally listed him for sale when he bucked me ten+ times in one event! I stayed on everytime(except when I hit my head but I managed to wait it out then slide off) and I truely loved this horse. I had a few people come look at him but almost everyone was put off that he was a bucker.
The first lady that liked him traded me his very energetic morgan, he was totally different, fast choppy gait, high head, lotsa energy and to tell the truth I knew it was going to take a long time to get use to and I didnt know if I was comfortable with him. Luckily the lady gave Tater back before she could trade him(we think she was a horsetrader) and the day he came back I was seriously thinking I might just give up gymkhana and keep him for trails. He was perfect riding in a halter and lead rope. The lady said he was horrible for her and when she told him he was going home he jumped in the trailer. I don't doubt that.
The second lady that took interest was lovely. She was so nice and happy. I knew they would be good and she bought him. I knew she was good for him the day she came to pick him up. He was having loading issues and decided not to get in the trailer. She sat there for almost an hour slowly coaxing him in because she knew if she rushed him or got upset that he wouldn't like the trailer. She also doesnt mind his bucking. She says he starts off every trail ride with his signature buck but she has learned to hang on and that now it routine.
I still really miss him and sometimes regret selling him, my new horse also needed work and he still does but I know it will take another year or so before I can get him to be calm like Tater or Bart on trails.
I have only seen Tater once since I sold him a year ago. It was from a distance but I really want to go and ask if I can ride him again. She would say yes.

Sorry for my novel its just I have been thinking about my decision to sell him lately(weather it was good or bad)...
     
    03-21-2010, 11:05 PM
  #30
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
I'm NOT arguing here, but just wondering. If you get say wild horse (btw, I don't see anything romantic about getting wild horse, but only problems unless you have tons of experience to deal with one) or horse with problems (for example, seller lied or you took one out of pity (YES, it's NOT the way to go, but things happen)), and horse is too much for you AND noone is interested even in taking it for free. Now what should you do? Put it down? Sell it to the meat plant?
that's what REALLY chaps my butt about the shutting down of kill houses in the states. There ARE some horses out there that are just plain truly useless. If they had not shut them down, then those who are in over their heads and know it would have an out that would be able to even come out with a buck or two in hand instead of absolutely nothing.
     

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