"Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on. - Page 5
 
 

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"Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on.

This is a discussion on "Playing the Hero" -- when to 'stick with it' & when to realize it's time to move on. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        04-12-2010, 10:17 PM
      #41
    Showing
    I believe now is an appropriate time for a BUMP.
         
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        04-12-2010, 10:37 PM
      #42
    Trained
    Amen!

    ****
         
        04-13-2010, 01:22 AM
      #43
    Super Moderator
    For sure! Preach it sista'! Lol
         
        04-14-2010, 10:28 AM
      #44
    Banned
    ...I love the excuse "we just don't have the money"

    I guess you should have done your homework before buying a horse... becuase horses do cost a lot of money be it vet bills, feed costs, tack, or training.

    If you don't 'have the money' for training then sell the horse and a) save up and buy somthing you can enjoy and ride or b) get out of horses until you do have the money.
         
        04-14-2010, 10:40 AM
      #45
    Green Broke
    Absolutely brilliant post, JDI. You ought to have this published. Seriously. This article needs read by every member of the horse community, especially the beginners, and I can think of quite a few non-beginners that would benefit from this read as well.

    Thank you for writing this.
         
        04-14-2010, 11:19 AM
      #46
    Green Broke
    JDI, wonderful post. It immediately brought me back to that "one" horse. Many years ago, I leased a couple of horses. One was a very well trained morgan cross, the other a gorgeous appy.

    Well, that appy put me through everything imaginable. Basically in a nut shell the horse didn't concern himself with his own safety, so mine was not even on the radar. Needless to say, did not renew the lease. But it left me feeling like I failed somehow.

    Off to lessons I went. There , my instructor evalualted me and after a short time, had me riding all the "new' horses. She liked how I handled each one, and felt I had the skills and temperment (calm and steady) to "size" each one up and give her "feed back" about them. She helped me gain my confindence back.

    When I finally spoke to her about the appy, she said something that struck home to me. First, was that a horse that doen't concern itself with it's own safety is a danger to everyone around it, including itself. Second, she told me that my instincts where correct that something was wrong with the horse, it wasn't my riding ability. My riding ability/instincts is what kept me safe, knowing when to push and when to back off.

    Long story short, I have never forgotten that horse. I know that if I ever run into another like it and get that feeling (horse not stable), I will dismount faster than a rocket! That is probably why a horses temperment/mind is so important to me.

    There is no shame in admitting that a particular horse is more (for whatever reason) then you can/want to handle at this point in your life. I am at an age now that I do not walk away from a fall. There will be an injury, and I have too many financial responsibilities to risk it.

    So, I leave "playing the hero" to the characters in the movies. I ride because it's my hobby and relaxation. Can't do that if the horse is way too much to handle, for whatever reason.
         
        04-14-2010, 10:07 PM
      #47
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Walkamile    
    JDI, wonderful post. It immediately brought me back to that "one" horse. Many years ago, I leased a couple of horses. One was a very well trained morgan cross, the other a gorgeous appy.

    Well, that appy put me through everything imaginable. Basically in a nut shell the horse didn't concern himself with his own safety, so mine was not even on the radar. Needless to say, did not renew the lease. But it left me feeling like I failed somehow.

    Off to lessons I went. There , my instructor evalualted me and after a short time, had me riding all the "new' horses. She liked how I handled each one, and felt I had the skills and temperment (calm and steady) to "size" each one up and give her "feed back" about them. She helped me gain my confindence back.

    When I finally spoke to her about the appy, she said something that struck home to me. First, was that a horse that doen't concern itself with it's own safety is a danger to everyone around it, including itself. Second, she told me that my instincts where correct that something was wrong with the horse, it wasn't my riding ability. My riding ability/instincts is what kept me safe, knowing when to push and when to back off.

    Long story short, I have never forgotten that horse. I know that if I ever run into another like it and get that feeling (horse not stable), I will dismount faster than a rocket! That is probably why a horses temperment/mind is so important to me.

    There is no shame in admitting that a particular horse is more (for whatever reason) then you can/want to handle at this point in your life. I am at an age now that I do not walk away from a fall. There will be an injury, and I have too many financial responsibilities to risk it.

    So, I leave "playing the hero" to the characters in the movies. I ride because it's my hobby and relaxation. Can't do that if the horse is way too much to handle, for whatever reason.

    Walkamile, that is almost exactly my own experience, with the one "bad egg" I had as well! Only she was a friesian/walker cross mare, she would be lathered before I even tightened the cinch. She frequently fell down on me trying to sidepass the entire 2.5 mile trail course I rode on (she's just sidepass when I would keep her from bolting). Those are almost the exact words I was told - "she doesn't care about her own safety so she certainly doesn't give a **** about her rider". The third trainer I brought in to work with her just told me flat out, she's just not meant to be a riding horse. She never will be.

    But in a weird way, while giving her up was certainly the right choice, I'm kinda glad I had her, too. It's good to be confronted with your limits from time to time, lest you come to think you have none.
         
        04-15-2010, 12:46 AM
      #48
    Foal
    I find it is a lot easier to fall truly in LOVE with a horse you feel comfortable and confident riding, than one that scares the crap out of you. Otherwise It's like an abusive relationship.
         
        04-15-2010, 02:29 AM
      #49
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
    I'm NOT arguing here, but just wondering. If you get say wild horse (btw, I don't see anything romantic about getting wild horse, but only problems unless you have tons of experience to deal with one) or horse with problems (for example, seller lied or you took one out of pity (YES, it's NOT the way to go, but things happen)), and horse is too much for you AND noone is interested even in taking it for free. Now what should you do? Put it down? Sell it to the meat plant?
    My last horse (the one I lost last May) was sold to me as being ready to ride...I soon found out the contrary, that he was no where near being ready to ride, and was in fact fearful of everything and anything to do with human beings. Well...fortunately for me, that didn't matter a whole lot, as I had wanted a project horse anyway. I hadn't bargained for having to totally retrain him, but that's what I did...I went back and trained him like as if no one had ever touched him before, and I did it slowly; I figured, it had taken them 5 years to get him this fearful, there was no way I was going to undo it in just a few weeks...well, okay, I could have, but why bother? I had his whole life to spend enjoying him, so why rush things? So I spent the next 10 months reintroducing him to everything, and finally after owning him for 11 months, I finally presumed him to be ready, mentally, to ride...we never looked back, he was the best trail horse I have owned. So to answer your question, if I wind up with a horse with issues that I may not have been told, I try my best to slowly work through them...if I win, like I did with Pride, fabulous...if I don't, then I would look at finding another person who may have more experience than me in dealing with that particular issue or behavior in a horse and sell, or place the horse with full disclosure.

    Now, I've never experienced a horse that is 'unfixable' quite yet, but I guess if I ever did, the most humane thing I could think of would be to put it down...I couldn't, personally, place a horse with issues that could get someone killed no matter if they knew about them or not; if the horse is so damaged on the inside that there's no hope for him to come around, I would rather know what happened to him than to place him with someone else, and potentially start a cycle of him being handed from person to person, possibly being abused and neglected in the process. I know some people are opposed to putting an animal to sleep that is 'healthy' physically but I think an animal that is unstable mentally is unhealthy as well, and if it is so bad to the extent that is impunes that animal's quality of life, I think it's up to us to decide what's best for him.
    sweetpea likes this.
         
        02-18-2011, 09:43 PM
      #50
    Showing
    Time for a big ol' bump.
         

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