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Please Help! 3yr old backing

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        12-12-2011, 04:36 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Skyseternalangel - I wasn't sure how to describe what was happening, it all happened so fast!
         
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        12-12-2011, 04:37 PM
      #12
    Showing
    I'm glad you're okay :) but I think she needs a slower more solid start before you bring in lunge lines, whips (yikes!), really short reins. She definitely looks overwhelmed.

    Slow things down :) When you get a trainer, then it'd be more consistent and her training would progress more. But only once she understands the basics of respect, space, and release!
    KinlaraSerenMai likes this.
         
        12-12-2011, 04:40 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    What is going on in the picture though.... I see the horse is upset but there are a lot of things that the poster said that aren't happening or things that they didn't mention that are happening..
    I know I haven't explained it very well, I was trying to upload the photo to show what was happening, but the lunge whip wasn't being used to punish, which is what it looks like. Her stirrups were tied below her belly (which again is stupid, mum's idea) She was alwaso wearing a neck strap but when I grasped on to that it got worse (yet another silly thing to do), I have no experience so it was my first reaction, thankyou :)
         
        12-12-2011, 04:42 PM
      #14
    Foal
    You've over faced that horse. Reins and a bit with signals from you, cavesson and side reins and signals from the person on the ground and her young brain has gone into meltdown.

    Obviously a picture is only a snapshot in time and not a great indication of what happened, but I would question the person lunging...Why is their body language blocking the horse? (right shoulder into the horse) I'm guessing the horse has turned around as the person lunging has the lunge line and whip in the wrong hands. The side reins are twisted and too tight (even tying to evade and buck she still has her head pulled in). Well done on wearing a body protector and hat although I can't see that the stirrups are tied under? It seems your feet are in them.

    Stop and go back to basics otherwise you are going to have a serious issue on your hands. It takes no time at all to turn a good horse bad when they are young. Try not to be too upset though, you're doing the right thing by asking questions and it's clear you're trying to do the best for your horse.
         
        12-12-2011, 04:51 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Pyrrhic    
    You've over faced that horse. Reins and a bit with signals from you, cavesson and side reins and signals from the person on the ground and her young brain has gone into meltdown.

    Obviously a picture is only a snapshot in time and not a great indication of what happened, but I would question the person lunging...Why is their body language blocking the horse? (right shoulder into the horse) I'm guessing the horse has turned around as the person lunging has the lunge line and whip in the wrong hands. The side reins are twisted and too tight (even tying to evade and buck she still has her head pulled in). Well done on wearing a body protector and hat although I can't see that the stirrups are tied under? It seems your feet are in them.

    Stop and go back to basics otherwise you are going to have a serious issue on your hands. It takes no time at all to turn a good horse bad when they are young. Try not to be too upset though, you're doing the right thing by asking questions and it's clear you're trying to do the best for your horse.
    Thankyou for your help, they were definitely tied underneath, I don't even know how I got my feet in, but I know I would have probably broken my foot/ankle if I was trapped. First reaction again I think, I know I'm not ready but I never expected this all to happen..
         
        12-12-2011, 05:23 PM
      #16
    Teen Forum Moderator
    How were they tied, exactly? I'm also seeing them at a normal length with your feet in them...

    You've been given some good advice. Slow down, take it one tiny step at a time. Three year old horses are still immature and over-stimulation is the main cause of disasters with young horses all across the world. Adding side-reins, a cavesson, a saddle, a lunge line, a rider, and a whip to an extremely green horse is like tossing a fifth grader into algebra. They can pretend to understand, but within a very short time- they're overwhelmed and they blow up. In this filly's case- I mean blow up quite literally.

    Go back to the beginning. No tack, no lunge line, no side reins, just a halter and lead rope. Baby steps. Does she know how to back on the ground, respond to voice cues, and yield to pressure? If not- start here. You cannot ride a horse that does not understand that pressure is the cue to move, and that movement is the only way to stop the pressure. Teach her to yield to you at the shoulders, at the poll, at the neck, the hindquarters, and at the girth-where your feet will eventually be resting. She should move the moment you touch her after a while, no pressure needed. She knows what to expect and why. She should respond to the verbal 'woah, back, walk, and trot' instantly and obediently. Only then should you move on to something besides leadline work. I teach all of my weanlings and yearlings this from the start, making it fun and rewarding. After all, they're still babies.

    Once she has mastered this, move on to just wearing the saddle. Repeat all previouse lessons with the saddle, asking her to yield to pressure. Lunge her at only a walk and trot on a 20-25 ft line, and teach her to change directions as soon as you ask. Make sure she is absolutely comfortable. Desensatize her to the saddle and your lunge line as soon as you're done.

    always keep sessions less than 25 minutes long, and reward her with praise, a good scratching, or perhaps a carrot. Lunging should only be 5-10 minutes long.

    Next, move on to the bridle. Do not lunge her in the bridle yet. Simply work on leading, giving to pressure on both sides of the mouth, and flexation. Once she is comfortable with this (I'd give it atleast three sessions) and not mouthing at all or showing wariness or hesitation, you can lunge her at a walk and trot with the bridle but no side reins. Draw up your stirrups- do not tie them in any way or form. Do not have both a bridle and a cavesson on at the same time. Pick one and use it. Do not interchange.

    Babies thrive on short, meaningful, consistant sessions. Three ten minute sessions will teach her ten times faster than one thirty minute lesson.

    I would not attempt to back her at all until you get a trainer, and even then- do it in a safe, enclosed area with few distractions. It'd be best for your trainer to do it the first few times, and please don't do it while she's on a lunge line! The last thing you need is for her to bowl someone over or trip on the line, or get whacked in the face like she did in the picture. No whip should ever be used on a green horse.

    Otherwise...I don't really know what to say. Don't make rash decisions, alawys have an experienced handler with you, and don't overestimate your filly's maturity. She may just need another 6 months or a year of being a baby. Horses mature at different ages, just like people. You can't mature a horse by throwing stuff at it. It just comes with time.
    Tianimalz, QHriderKE and Pyrrhic like this.
         
        12-12-2011, 06:17 PM
      #17
    Foal
    The key is definentIy working from the ground up Iike aII these heIpfuI peopIe have been saying.
         
        12-12-2011, 06:33 PM
      #18
    Started
    So, is sending this horse to a trainer an option? Cause if I couldn't handle what that horse is doing, i'd let someone more experienced have a shot.

    I'm 16 too, but I believe I've had more experience with buckers and brats. Heck, I got hired to train problem horses and horses with bucking and other kinds of bad habits. My 3 year old was a bucker, but I learned that if I worked her at a trot and got her to be round and soft for a few minutes, I could ask her to do whatever I wanted. Maybe you just have to find what makes your horse work for you. For both of you.

    What these people have been saying is all good advice.
         
        12-12-2011, 06:38 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    I'm going to tell you, from first hand experience, get a trainer.

    I have a coming four year old who I've also had for two years. I took her training as far as I could with my own knowledge, but it got to the point where I didn't know what I was doing anymore, which it sounds like that's where you are, too.

    So, I swallowed my pride and called in a trainer.

    It was by far the most well spent dollar I've ever spent on my horse.

    I could only afford 30 days, but this got me a solid, and SAFE, walk/trot.

    A professional's help is invaluable.

    And I'm 18, so we're not far in age, either.
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        12-12-2011, 09:57 PM
      #20
    Foal
    That is a huge buck. I agree with sky manners is key to a good foundation. I have a 1 1/2 year old gelding who can be a lil tinker at times but I only have to raise my voice and pull the headcollar before he calms down and respects that im incharge. Their only going to get bigger so you need to take it slow and work on trust.
    Hopes this works :)
         

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