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Problem Horse - Rearing

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  • Horse flipped over backwards

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    05-31-2013, 09:52 AM
  #21
Trained
Eggsactly Foxhunter.
     
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    05-31-2013, 10:08 AM
  #22
Super Moderator
Cowboy Bob - I like the way Paul deals with the horses. He is quiet, never flustered and a darn good rider.

I have had many rearers, most do it to frighten the rider - generally that works.

I have had them flip over though the wisest confirmed rearers will go up and smash onto their sides.

I had one horse that was one of the nappiest ever! He would go so far, stop dead go up a foot or so, if the ground was not slippery (this was often on the roads) he would go right up. If he felt it was slippery then he would continue to a place where it wasn't and resume his antics.
He would go vertical, I could hang onto a rein and haul and he would still turn the opposite way and charge from whence he had come! I would pull him up and take him back, at the same spot he would repeat.

I tried everything I knew to no avail. The beggar never won nor did I ever dismount, there was no pain or any other excuse other than he knew exactly how to get out of work. (His previous groom had always taken him back when he switched off)
In the end he napped in the middle of the village at the X roads. I could have gone anyway bar straight on So, I sat him out. 3 hours we stood there. 3 hours vehicles had to weave past him. 3 hours of children and old ladies saying "Isn't he lovely! Can he have a sweetie?"
I smiled down at them and said through gritted teeth "No he is not lovely and he certainly cannot have a sweetie!"

That 3 hours was one of the best I have ever spent on a horse. It stopped his antics most of the time and when he did decided it was a no go day, I could get him to go with only minor tussles.
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    05-31-2013, 10:33 AM
  #23
Trained
Endopink rocks! I bought pink breeches in honor of him! Whenever I see those vids, still gives me a sick feeling that I will never shake.
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    05-31-2013, 11:02 AM
  #24
Foal
ReiningGirl I can relate to your situation. I just recently sold my 6 yo mare that started rearing because she didn't want to work, side pass (which she has always done flawlessly), or to even stand still and she would precede into a rearing fit. The full straight up and she also flipped over four different times as well. A couple were on the side while the other two were straight back.

I soon learned that anything I tried didn't work she would just shut down after a while. The funny thing was would be that she would be fine for two weeks then do it all over again! I ended up taking her to a professional trainer. He tried every trick in the book, even put the tarp over her while hobled. Nothing worked.....

I ended up selling her at an auction and I let the people know about her issue but they felt confident they could fix her. About three weeks later I saw her for sale. I believe for her she was past the point on fixing it. What was crazy is that she was so respectful on the ground.

I sincerely hope you can find something to fix her problem!
Fyi : we did check for pain issues and nothing was causing pain.
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    05-31-2013, 11:53 AM
  #25
Green Broke
I hate to say this.. but after a few years more than I care to count around horses... I learned the following is very true.

Never a horse that couldn't be rode.
Never a cowboy that couldn't be throwed.

Some horses get the best of everything and are still jerks. Fortunately they are few in number.

More people get the best of everything and are still jerks and there are more of them than jerk horses.
     
    05-31-2013, 12:51 PM
  #26
Trained
I haven't read through all the post, however, the one thing I will not "do" is random rearing. IMO, it is the single most dangerous "habit" a horse can have. A trusted horse that might, for justifiable reason, go up and you can give them their head and go forward is "expected"...one that just does it out of the blue...no thanks, you never know if they have sense enough not to do it in a precarious situation or have overestimated their own "athletic" ability w a rider on their back. If it were me, I would find a well respected trainer that had a lot of success with overcoming the problem in the past.
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    05-31-2013, 01:35 PM
  #27
Banned
I think there's a useful distinctions to be made here. There are different types of rearers, IMO and IME -

First, a lot of horses at some point in their training will try a small rear as a resistance, a "No, I don't want to and you can't make me." or as part of a spook. I don't mind dealing with this; driving them forward and/or keeping them from planting their hinds works very well. If it's not a successful resistance, that is, they aren't able to avoid work by doing it, time and training pretty much make a non-issue.

Second type is a "confirmed" rearer, a horse that has been mishandled and allowed to be successful at rearing to avoid work and will rear at anytime they're faced with something they don't want to do. IMO, these are VERY different problem and very hard to fix. When I was younger, fitter and stupider I did work with a couple and work throught it, but they were never horses that could be trusted with a tentative rider. Foxhunter's story about standing in the cross roads for 3 hours sounds like a confirmed rearer.

Worst of all is a confirmed rearer that has flipped over and still rears. This, IMO, is a dangerous horse, one that cares more about resisting that its own safety. This horses should not be ridden and should probably be put down. (It's dangerous even for a handler on the ground, I had one flip over in a narrow barn aisle right next to me once
     
    05-31-2013, 01:49 PM
  #28
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    

Worst of all is a confirmed rearer that has flipped over and still rears. This, IMO, is a dangerous horse, one that cares more about resisting that its own safety. This horses should not be ridden and should probably be put down. (It's dangerous even for a handler on the ground, I had one flip over in a narrow barn aisle right next to me once
I'm curious to know: in your experience, do horses that flip tend to only do it once (because they've scared themselves, etc.), or is a horse that has flipped over just as likely to continue rearing the same as before? Or does it just depend on the individual?
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    05-31-2013, 02:08 PM
  #29
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaphyJaphy    
I'm curious to know: in your experience, do horses that flip tend to only do it once (because they've scared themselves, etc.), or is a horse that has flipped over just as likely to continue rearing the same as before? Or does it just depend on the individual?
I think it really depends on the individual. Because that mare I brought up earlier flipped over four times and kept doing it.

But I did have a 4 yo gelding that reared and he flipped over once and never thought about rearing ever again.

But I may be wrong, but this is from my own experiences.
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    05-31-2013, 03:06 PM
  #30
Banned
I know trainin a horse to rear aint the same as a horse that's jumpin up on two feet straight up in the air or that's steppin backwards about to flip - but the point in the (as golden puts it) 'old egg trick' is to smash it before the horse goes up that high- soon as that horses front end gets light and those feet come off the ground- smash the egg! Do not wait for them to go up as high as they can! That's only for the very start of the rear to stop it in its tracks.

And I never grab the neck on a rearer because the few times I had I found it made them take those wobbly steps backwards- either jump off or lean forward as far as you can with your chest pressed against the neck but never grab ahold of the neck for ballancing yourself- theres 1000 pounds of meat that's bein ballanced by two toothpicks and yes- your body weight can and will make them go over backwards! It should never ever get to this point though!!!
     

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