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Problem Horse - Rearing

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  • Horse reared and fell on me

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    05-31-2013, 04:16 PM
  #31
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaphyJaphy    
I'm curious to know: in your experience, do horses that flip tend to only do it once (because they've scared themselves, etc.), or is a horse that has flipped over just as likely to continue rearing the same as before? Or does it just depend on the individual?
I have had all sorts!
One big Irish TB that came in for breaking prior to going into jump training was a so and so.
I said from the moment I started working him (he was 4 years) that he had been tried. The sales catalogue said 'Lunged and long reined until the time of the sales'
He was a nappy dog and his favourite trick was to get to the side of the road, stand vertical and instead of going over would go down to the side so he never hurt himself.

I have had the odd youngster do something and go up not knowing what they are doing over balance and flip. Once and it frightens them others will find it a good excuse to do it again.

Anther confirmed rearer we flipped him over into a river. He swam for about 1/2 mile before he could gain the bank and I got straight on him and he immediately flipped again!

I busted my back in three places when a young filly had a hissy fit and went up. I bailed out and was stood by her side holding the reins when she teetered trying not to go over, she slipped and fell to the side. I slipped as I tried to get out the way but she landed on me. She never reared again.

As for the horse I mentioned earlier, he was a 'character' and of all the horses I have ridden before and since, he would be the one I would want to clone. He never gave up trying all sorts of things on, he never won but he still tried! He knew when I was cross with him and would take it whereas when he first came he would fight back if you corrected him. As he was 16.2 heavyweight hunter and knew his strength it was vital that he respected me.
He was hogged (roached) and to do so meant twitching him and being quick to run the clippers down either side of his mane - if you weren't he would just throw you around on the end of the twitch. After the first few weeks of coming to an agreement, I would leave him loose, stand on a stool, he would put his head right down. I would step down and his head would go up. This would go on for a few minutes and then I would poke him in the neck and tell him to stop messing and he was as good as gold to do. T was a matter of coming to an agreement with him rather than telling him.

Heck, I loved that horse like no other.
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    05-31-2013, 04:17 PM
  #32
Cat
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by toto    
And I never grab the neck on a rearer because the few times I had I found it made them take those wobbly steps backwards- either jump off or lean forward as far as you can with your chest pressed against the neck but never grab ahold of the neck for ballancing yourself- theres 1000 pounds of meat that's bein ballanced by two toothpicks and yes- your body weight can and will make them go over backwards! It should never ever get to this point though!!!
Jump off? Seriously? Quickest way in the world for the horse to learn rearing = bailing rider and a quick way to get out of work. That will just lead to reinforcing the behavior.
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    05-31-2013, 04:20 PM
  #33
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat    
Jump off? Seriously? Quickest way in the world for the horse to learn rearing = bailing rider and a quick way to get out of work. That will just lead to reinforcing the behavior.
If a horse gets to the teetering then bailing out is the safest thing. Sod being on a horse when it does go right over.
Look at the video I posted.
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    05-31-2013, 05:44 PM
  #34
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat    
Jump off? Seriously? Quickest way in the world for the horse to learn rearing = bailing rider and a quick way to get out of work. That will just lead to reinforcing the behavior.

Equestrian 101- bein able to judge if you needa bail off or ride it out.
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    05-31-2013, 05:59 PM
  #35
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
If a horse gets to the teetering then bailing out is the safest thing. Sod being on a horse when it does go right over.
Look at the video I posted.

This behavior should have been stopped long before this point.
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    05-31-2013, 06:04 PM
  #36
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by palogal    
This behavior should have been stopped long before this point.

That's the point-- it wasnt stopped and bailing off is safer than throwing your horse off ballance by grabbin his neck.. if the rider don't know how to stop the behavior before it gets to this point- they need a professional obviously- in the mean time if it does happen- bail! Do not try to be a cowboy/girl and hang on!
     
    05-31-2013, 06:44 PM
  #37
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by palogal    
This behavior should have been stopped long before this point.
I cannot disagree with you. However some horses do learn to rear and then are sent to people like Paul to sort out.

This occurred in Japan where horsemanship is not at its strongest. Also many TB colts, stuffed with hard feed and feeling very coltish will go up just because it is their nature to do so. Lack of know how often leads to many problems.
     
    05-31-2013, 08:59 PM
  #38
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
I cannot disagree with you. However some horses do learn to rear and then are sent to people like Paul to sort out.

This occurred in Japan where horsemanship is not at its strongest. Also many TB colts, stuffed with hard feed and feeling very coltish will go up just because it is their nature to do so. Lack of know how often leads to many problems.
You are all over the map. Babies rear because they're babies and that is easily corrected. Coltish or not and it's not specific to TB's either. And I have no idea what 'stuffed with hard feet' means.

This horse has a behavior problem and it needs to be firmly and quickly corrected. Jumping off of this horse gives him what he wants. The problem has to be fixed before the front feet leave the ground with a redirection of energy and motion.
     
    05-31-2013, 09:00 PM
  #39
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaphyJaphy    
I'm curious to know: in your experience, do horses that flip tend to only do it once (because they've scared themselves, etc.), or is a horse that has flipped over just as likely to continue rearing the same as before? Or does it just depend on the individual?
Good question...I have the same thought.
     
    06-01-2013, 01:34 AM
  #40
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by palogal    
You are all over the map. Babies rear because they're babies and that is easily corrected. Coltish or not and it's not specific to TB's either. And I have no idea what 'stuffed with hard feet' means.

This horse has a behavior problem and it needs to be firmly and quickly corrected. Jumping off of this horse gives him what he wants. The problem has to be fixed before the front feet leave the ground with a redirection of energy and motion.
no- babies rear for the same reason mature horses do- they feel traped and do it as a last resort- its a horses way of getting bigger- intimidation when they can't run away from a situation.

If this horse rears up to the point there tilting backwards or takin those backwards steps on the hind legs you should have bailed a long time ago because this means you have no clue what you're doin- and you need a professional trainer!

grabbin a horses neck tryin to ballance yourself will get you smashed! Have you ever had a 1000+ pound animal land on top of you? It don't feel too good I can tell you that!

Know when to judge a situation you can't handle and bail off before you get hurt- that's horse ridin 101! If you aint been in a situation where you had to bail off a horse you probably aint been ridin long at all.
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