Problems getting my mare out of the field.
   

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Problems getting my mare out of the field.

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  • How to get your horse out of a feild
  • My horse cuts across in front of me when i lead

 
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    10-22-2011, 04:39 AM
  #1
Foal
Problems getting my mare out of the field.

I've had my mare for just over three months now. The first few weeks she was absolutely brilliant, couldnt fault her on anything. Then I started to have trouble catching her, she'd trot/canter round me in a circle not letting me near her but would eventually give up after 5 minutes or so then I could take her out the field & do whatever I had planned to do with no problems.

Then she started getting a little worse, it would take me about 20 minutes to catch her, or she'd let me catch her straight away but wouldnt let me lead her across the field, she will walk next to me for a few steps then leap into a trot, cut across in front of me and round me in a circle then she'd stop and walk again and do the exact same thing over and over again until we got to the gate. On one occasion when we got to the gate she reared, pulled back and bolted off across the field with headcoller and leadrope still attached.

Now she's even worse to the point that she trampled me in the field the other day, not even when I was trying to get her out. I was putting her back in the field! She will now let me catch her straight away but we have the same problems with leading her across the field. On a few occasions she has actually reared and turned towards me and almost caught me. She's getting dangerous now and it needs to be sorted out, I just don't know how to sort it. I've tried leading her in with a bridle on and she's still exactly the same if not worse. She doesnt get ridden every time she is taken out of the field. She gets hay & occasionally treats whilst she's out of the field so its not like she's having a bad time. She's an absolute angel to ride/groom/handle out of the field...i don't get what her problem is. Help? >.<
     
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    10-22-2011, 07:33 AM
  #2
Super Moderator
She is a well-trained mare that you gradually let get more and more in control of your relationship. Instead of you being the lead horse in your herd of two (you and her), you are waaaay down the pecking order -- you are at the bottom of it -- as far down as you can go.

The very first time she showed any tiniest bit of disrespect, she found out there were no consequences. So, she 'pushed' a little harder -- and you backed off. So she pushed a little harder -- and you backed off completely. Now, you are just trying to stay alive in her presence -- where she is completely in charge.

There is no mystery in it. She is just being a horse and you have faild as a herd leader. Have you ever seen a horse at the bottom of the pecking order in a herd of horses? They have bite mark and chunks missing all over. They are driven from the feed. They are driven from the middle of the herd and are barely allowed to exist on the fringe edge of the herd. That is where you are. If you do not learn how to gain respect and re-gain your rightful place as the leader. She will get increasingly mean and will, indeed, become dangerous.

If you do not know these things and do not understand how to interact with a horse to become the leader of the herd, you need to find a trainer or a mentor that can help you. At this point you do not know what you do not know.

If you want to try to explore DVDs, Clinton Anderson has a very good set of them on 'respect'. That would be a good place to start. Without a horse's complete and total respect, they can be a big and very dangerous animal to be around. Some horses are quite 'timid ' and subordinate by nature. Others are very dominant and need to be kept in their proper place in every relationship. Yours is a dominant horse by nature and you are the perfect subordination herd member.

And, by the way, what you feed and how your care and treat your horse does not have any effect on your relationship with your horse. It is totally determined by how you interact with her, what behavior you accept and what behavior you correct her for and do not accept.
     
    10-22-2011, 08:08 AM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
She is a well-trained mare that you gradually let get more and more in control of your relationship. Instead of you being the lead horse in your herd of two (you and her), you are waaaay down the pecking order -- you are at the bottom of it -- as far down as you can go.

The very first time she showed any tiniest bit of disrespect, she found out there were no consequences. So, she 'pushed' a little harder -- and you backed off. So she pushed a little harder -- and you backed off completely. Now, you are just trying to stay alive in her presence -- where she is completely in charge.

There is no mystery in it. She is just being a horse and you have faild as a herd leader. Have you ever seen a horse at the bottom of the pecking order in a herd of horses? They have bite mark and chunks missing all over. They are driven from the feed. They are driven from the middle of the herd and are barely allowed to exist on the fringe edge of the herd. That is where you are. If you do not learn how to gain respect and re-gain your rightful place as the leader. She will get increasingly mean and will, indeed, become dangerous.

If you do not know these things and do not understand how to interact with a horse to become the leader of the herd, you need to find a trainer or a mentor that can help you. At this point you do not know what you do not know.

If you want to try to explore DVDs, Clinton Anderson has a very good set of them on 'respect'. That would be a good place to start. Without a horse's complete and total respect, they can be a big and very dangerous animal to be around. Some horses are quite 'timid ' and subordinate by nature. Others are very dominant and need to be kept in their proper place in every relationship. Yours is a dominant horse by nature and you are the perfect subordination herd member.

And, by the way, what you feed and how your care and treat your horse does not have any effect on your relationship with your horse. It is totally determined by how you interact with her, what behavior you accept and what behavior you correct her for and do not accept.
Well said.
Just watch some DVD's and learn learn learn. For your safety, you do NOT want her to be the "leader of your pack"
     

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