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Problems lounging (Horse kicks at my head)

This is a discussion on Problems lounging (Horse kicks at my head) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        01-26-2011, 06:12 PM
      #61
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ray MacDonald    
    Don't just give him a TAP!! I find this very annoying when people say they don't want to hurt their little ponys.. sometimes you have to give them some pain to stop the bad behavior! Don't be so worried!
    I heavily agree.I don't by any means think you should beat the tar out of them.I always try every other option in correction before resorting to more sever punishment.
    And I don't think a good solid slap on the backside would even cause a horse that much pain,Just enough to snap that bugger out of his train of thought,which in this case is kicking.

    All I can really say is IMO,I think the poster should stick with her current trainer,sounds like he/she has a good head on their shoulders and knows what they are doing and feels confident enough to handle your horse.(from what I have read at least)
    Until that trainer can control your horse with no issues,I wouldn't suggest you do any longeing,But I also wouldn't suggest you stop spending time with him.If you say he's fine doing basic ground work,then do it.Just be on your toes,you can't ever drop your guard around a horse like this.I also agree with the idea he has very little respect for you.I would ask your trainer if they could possibly work with both you and your horse with building his respect and confidence in you.I'm sure they would be happy to do so.
         
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        01-26-2011, 06:31 PM
      #62
    Started
    I don't think that you should be spending any more time with horse alone, trying to fix things up. Why? Because you don't know how to fix it. Internet advice will always be conflicting & therefore confusing.

    I suggest that you look up that "horse whisperer" & see if he can help, & if not, keep looking for the skilled horseman who will be able to, & show you how it's done.

    It's time for the real deal: someone who's spent years learning to feel of & for the horse, & who can help you build a foundation of good feeling/respect between you & your horse.

    Finding that person may take time, but "take the time it takes, so it will take less time".

    Good Luck to you & your horse!
         
        01-26-2011, 09:21 PM
      #63
    Foal
    I have already posted my expierience but I absolutely agree about Respect, you have to have that from him hands down. I am a newbie owner of more "forward" horse. I have learned confidence and the respect factor of horse ownership well. My step back came from him running away with me and after that to the trainer I went and she started me from ground zero. This woman is as tiny as they come but she is fierce, she's not mean and nasty but you can bet your life that the horses she works with know who she is and what behavior she expects from them. I am so happy that Brown did run away with and that she was coincedentally there to help or I maybe wouldnt have gotten back in the saddle. Brown and I have work to do but I already see the changes in his behavior and attitude. He used to barely flick an ear back and it had me nerous and backing out of the stall(he charged me a few times). Now he doesn't even try to intimidate me. I am his 5th owner in his young life of 8 and mostly he's been put to pature for his attitude. Keep working with your trainer and be safe. You are a brave girl, the kicking thing freaks me out.
         
        01-26-2011, 09:56 PM
      #64
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Infinity    
    We are making a lot of progress with the farrier, but we're still not there yet. He's fine with the vet, and he leads and ties well. By just "living in my pasture", I meant not riding him, BUT I don't want that. I bought him as a dressage horse (he has great movement), and I'm really striving to get better at this, both for him and myself.

    Most of the posts on here have been quite encouraging. I know this can be fixed, and I know it's probably my fault it even started in the first place. I really want to help him through this, and correct whatever fault I have with this.

    I will go out an purchase a cavesson as soon as I get to the tack store. To be honest, I have never even tried this on him. I will also start to notice every movement he makes before hand, especially the dropping of the shoulder. I'm not afraid to get mean with him. I think I need to before he kicks, when he shows his first signs. Am I right?
    I give you a lot of credit for still responding to this post. After people start arguing with me about MY horse, I repeat MY horse, I just delete what I originally posted and then I'm done. You ask for peoples opinions, and then they feel the need to argue with you about a horse they do not know.

    Once again, good luck with the horse! I hope he does mature and stops with the dangerous attitude, but if he doesn't, then stick him in a pasture. That's really nobody elses problem but your own.

    Kudos(:
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        01-27-2011, 12:51 PM
      #65
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Northern    
    I don't think that you should be spending any more time with horse alone, trying to fix things up. Why? Because you don't know how to fix it. Internet advice will always be conflicting & therefore confusing.

    I suggest that you look up that "horse whisperer" & see if he can help, & if not, keep looking for the skilled horseman who will be able to, & show you how it's done.

    It's time for the real deal: someone who's spent years learning to feel of & for the horse, & who can help you build a foundation of good feeling/respect between you & your horse.

    Finding that person may take time, but "take the time it takes, so it will take less time".

    Good Luck to you & your horse!
    She has a trainer working with her horse, she isn't trying to do it by herself.
    She just wanted ideas and peoples opinions on what to do.
         
        01-27-2011, 04:18 PM
      #66
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Infinity    
    I do understand what you're saying, but there is no way I am feeding his habit on this. I haven't lunged him in months. He has been working with three professional trainers. The first one dropped him because she got kicked. The second one I dropped because he refused to try working with him (heard stories from the first trainer), and he does the same thing with the trainer I have now.
    Right, so I stand by my suggestion to find the trainer who'll fix it & show Infinity how to fix it.
         

    Tags
    afraid of my horse, aggression, kicking, lounging, lunging

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