Pulley rein for bolting horse - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 45 Old 03-13-2010, 12:36 PM Thread Starter
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Pulley rein for bolting horse

I see there are several threads on stopping a horse that is bolting for the barn or just out of control. I advocate the emergency one rein stop most of the time. Many times you don't have the space or the balance needed to do this maneuver.
I saw this video several months ago and started practicing it with my horse. Its a fabulous tool to have in your horse toolbox, so I'm posting the video again.
It doesn't start until about 3:20 into the vid so be patient


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post #2 of 45 Old 03-13-2010, 12:55 PM
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This video has been posted before. What it is trying to say is how to gain more leverage for the weak rider. The same thing can be accomplished with a simple cur bit. A weak rider with a snaffle can have a problem stopping a horse, just like the older lady that owns that horse.
Put a simple tom thumb curb bit and you instantly have the extra leverage without resorting to a one rein type stop.
People are so worried about hurting the horse's mouth with a curb and they actually have to use the snaffle much more aggressively to gain control where a simple curb used gentley would actually allow them to have more control and at the same time use thier hands much more gently.

Those reining horses we all admire and do everything so effortless all have had hard lessons with curbs to produce the light animals they became.

You do not get a soft horse by being soft all the time.
Do yourself and the horse a favor and use a curb
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post #3 of 45 Old 03-13-2010, 01:13 PM
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Thanks for posting I enjoyed the info on the video
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post #4 of 45 Old 03-13-2010, 09:02 PM Thread Starter
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Do yourself and the horse a favor and use a curb
I do use a curb bit. I re-posted the video because after seeing it here on the forum, I have been practicing it. I found it a very good maneuver.


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Last edited by Vidaloco; 03-13-2010 at 09:05 PM.
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post #5 of 45 Old 03-13-2010, 11:55 PM
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Rio's Dad- I will not put a harsher bit in my horse's mouth and why? Because I am learning to ride and don't have the hands or the finesse to ride with it. Harsh bits are for experienced riders with skills necessary to avoid banging the crap out of their horse's mouths not for those of us who don't have the ability to use the bit when it is needed and ignore it when it is not.

And I don't think being inexperienced is a crime- the only way to get better and experienced is to ride. You can't learn it all in a day. That being said, I had an experience last week where I was **** sure glad I had practiced a one rein stop- I lost a stirrup while cantering and the stirrup banging against my horse's side spooked him and he ran (not bolted exactly but I was definitely not in control) my instructor yelled "one rein stop" as I was clearly kind of scared, and having practiced it I pulled him right up and we went on happily with the rest of the lesson.

I think you DO have a point but there is not one rider with one level of experience out there. For us beginners who have no business "bitting up" this tool is a good one to have on hand for experiences like I described.
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post #6 of 45 Old 03-14-2010, 01:11 PM
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I liked that video. :] My horse likes to have the last word, and can occasionally turn into a bit of a bully undersaddle. The thing he'll most commonly do when he gets tired of something we're doing or wants to avoid working, is fling his head up in the air, almost invert his neck and ignore every single aid. When he gets like that there is NOTHING that will stop him but a one rein stop. He's getting better and better and I see this behavior less and less but he does still have it in his "i don't wanna work" toolbelt and will try to take advantage of you with it. I actually had to use this in my lesson yesterday when Zeus thought he knew the pattern better than me and tanked off in anticipation of the upward transition into the canter. I do exhaust all other aids and methods before doing this though, but sometimes you really just need to shut him down or he'll walk all over you.

Good informative video.

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post #7 of 45 Old 03-14-2010, 02:38 PM
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It's an interesting video. The only problem I see (I may be wrong though), what if the horse has a tendency to rear? It looks like this maneuver will encourage the rear on horse (especially if the horse is overexcited).
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post #8 of 45 Old 03-14-2010, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by kitten_Val View Post
It's an interesting video. The only problem I see (I may be wrong though), what if the horse has a tendency to rear? It looks like this maneuver will encourage the rear on horse (especially if the horse is overexcited).
I think this is something you would do on a bolting horse. I've never seen a horse bolt and rear at the same time. I think if you don't release after the stop it could be a possibility.
I haven't tried it at a stand still, only at a canter and gallop.


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post #9 of 45 Old 03-14-2010, 03:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosDad View Post
This video has been posted before. What it is trying to say is how to gain more leverage for the weak rider. The same thing can be accomplished with a simple cur bit. A weak rider with a snaffle can have a problem stopping a horse, just like the older lady that owns that horse.
Put a simple tom thumb curb bit and you instantly have the extra leverage without resorting to a one rein type stop.
People are so worried about hurting the horse's mouth with a curb and they actually have to use the snaffle much more aggressively to gain control where a simple curb used gentley would actually allow them to have more control and at the same time use thier hands much more gently.

Those reining horses we all admire and do everything so effortless all have had hard lessons with curbs to produce the light animals they became.

You do not get a soft horse by being soft all the time.
Do yourself and the horse a favor and use a curb

Some of our disciplines don't allow the use of these bits. And, IMO, Tom Thumb bits are a terrible design. I dislike any jointed curb.
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post #10 of 45 Old 03-14-2010, 04:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val View Post
It's an interesting video. The only problem I see (I may be wrong though), what if the horse has a tendency to rear? It looks like this maneuver will encourage the rear on horse (especially if the horse is overexcited).
In order to rear the horse has to stop so you at least won't be in a runaway.

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