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Pulley rein for bolting horse

This is a discussion on Pulley rein for bolting horse within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • "pulley stop" + "horse"
  • Pulley reins what do you use them for

 
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    03-14-2010, 05:24 PM
  #11
Yearling
I have used this maneuver with varying success. I'm not sure why, but Thunder did not respond to it the same way Razz does. Razz will stop, dead in his tracks. I do the same with Thunder, he just transitions down. Nice, but not what is desired from an emergency stop.

As for bits, Razz is ridden in an eggbutt(tom thumb while doing western events since he's picking up the neck rein), Thunder a full cheek. We currently do not have any curb bit small enough to fit Thunder(he has a teeny, odd-shaped head compared to his body). I might be able to find a tender-touch bit for him.. he's mouthy.
     
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    03-14-2010, 06:20 PM
  #12
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vidaloco    
I think this is something you would do on a bolting horse.
Oh yes, you and Kevin are right, silly me. I just didn't think about it, since Julie was doing it on not-a-bolting horse.
     
    03-14-2010, 06:43 PM
  #13
Showing
That doesn't seem like a bad idea. I guess a person would get quicker with the response with more practice but it sure seems to take a long time to get set up to use that method.

And RD, I think this is one of the few times that we have disagreed. I honestly don't believe that bitting up a horse is the proper way to handle that situation. Yes, it does give you more bite, but that defeats the whole purpose of using the curb bit. The curb is supposed to be for finesse, not control by force. Many people don't have the hands (or knowledge) to properly utilize a curb. If you know how and when to use that bite that comes with it, it can make a horse more responsive, but if you don't the horse will simply get harder and harder and the same old problems that a person had with the snaffle will show up with the curb and by that time, they are 100 times harder to train out of the horse. And usually, the rider will continue to step to a harsher bit in order to keep control.
     
    03-14-2010, 08:03 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Agreed^^
     
    03-14-2010, 10:43 PM
  #15
Trained
The thing with both the one rein stop and the pulley rein is that, if the rider practices it so much that it become second nature, it creates an instantaneous reaction that shuts down the horse's bolt, spook or whatever before it has time to get ugly. They do have to first be practiced in a controlled environment, but once they're automatic reactions, they're very effective in any situation.
     
    03-15-2010, 08:50 AM
  #16
Banned
The horse is a 17.1 hand TB with attitude. It decides what speed it wants to go. The rider lacks Confidence and lunges first to work up courage to ride the uncontrolled canter???

Have many of you ever stood beside a 17.1 hand horse. It's sheer size is intimidating.
I still don't agree that this lady should not bite up the horse more to her advantage. What are curb bits and their mechanical advantage usefull for anyway if not to give advantage to the rider???
I'll bet that 50% of the riders on this forum ride in curbs, alot of novices included.
The reining horses, that are so well trained ride in curbs much harsher then the majority of rider use and yet their horses are so well trained and they have loads of experience.

No a timid lady on a big big horse with attitude needs more then a snaffle, even adding a running martingale double the effective use of the snaffle if required.

Can you imagine that horse on a windy day, getting excited over something and deciding to run??? I would want more then a simple snaffle and I bet the mouthpiece on that snaffle would be big and thick to save the mouth

I also feel it is a mismatch of horse to rider. A non confident lady and a big big horse. You get far more enjoyment from a horse if the horse is better proportioned to the rider. The rider should also feel in total control of EVERY situation, no matter what comes up.
You should never feel fear when riding.
     
    03-15-2010, 03:31 PM
  #17
Yearling
I do agree with you on the rider mismatch- if you're afraid of a runaway or bolt on a regular basis there is a very basic problem, but let's not get carried away tacking up our horses to the hilt when it isn't generally necessary.

My horse is a big boy-16.3 and I am small 5'4", 5'5" on a good day. He is a TB with 'tude. I tried a harsher bit on him and he about blew up fighting the thing. I decided my hands are not educated enough for a harsher bit. 99.99% of the time we have no problem, but horses are horses and I do what I can to avoid disaster. Having a pulley rein stop in my tool box as well as an emergency dismount have given me control over the last .001% of the equation. No need to bang the crap out his mouth for the one day out of several hundred he might get a bit flighty on me.
     
    03-15-2010, 03:49 PM
  #18
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by tealamutt    
I do agree with you on the rider mismatch- if you're afraid of a runaway or bolt on a regular basis there is a very basic problem, but let's not get carried away tacking up our horses to the hilt when it isn't generally necessary.

My horse is a big boy-16.3 and I am small 5'4", 5'5" on a good day. He is a TB with 'tude. I tried a harsher bit on him and he about blew up fighting the thing. I decided my hands are not educated enough for a harsher bit. 99.99% of the time we have no problem, but horses are horses and I do what I can to avoid disaster. Having a pulley rein stop in my tool box as well as an emergency dismount have given me control over the last .001% of the equation. No need to bang the crap out his mouth for the one day out of several hundred he might get a bit flighty on me.
That's the point of the post. I didn't want a critique of the horse and rider or their suitability.
I believe everyone should have the knowledge of what to do in emergency situations. Its not something you will do on a regular basis but something that you need to know how to do. No different than knowing how to pull a shoe or treat a wound. You don't want to wait till the emergency is on you and then stand around saying "what do I do?"
     
    03-15-2010, 04:49 PM
  #19
Banned
Can we go over the steps for this pulley stop??
You are riding along and suddenly the horse bolts or is picking up speed and you can't slow him down??
You take a short grip on the left rein?? How do I do this. My normal riding length is too long so I slide my left hand down the rein. The rein is a wet noddle, it is not rigid so to slid it down the rein I must either release it and grab it shorter or I must use my other hand, my right hand to support the rein and then I can slide it down the rein for my shorter grip??
Do I have the left rein right??
Now I trap the left rein between my hand and the mane. This helps lock the rein?

Now for the right rein. I take a shorter grip?? Again how do I slide my hand along a wet noddle without grabbing by releasing and taking a quick grab for shorter handful?? I don't have a left hand to support the rein to slide it along? So somehow I get a shorter hold and hope I don't drop either rein in my attempt to get a shorter hold.
Then I pull pack with my right while the left is trapping the left rein to the neck.

Do I have this right?
I had better hope that I don't drop a rein while manuvering my hands for a better grip.
While all this is happening how far has the horse run, how scared am I all this time fiddling with the rein length?
     
    03-15-2010, 05:17 PM
  #20
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by tealamutt    
I. No need to bang the crap out his mouth for the one day out of several hundred he might get a bit flighty on me.
I beleive you are a very novice rider?? Why do you feel that anyone that rides in a curb is ""Banging the crap out of his mouth""

I see people riding with snaffles with a death grip on the reins, people taking dessage lessons. They complain about their sore arms and hands after a lesson?? I ride their horses and find them a bunch of hard mouth animals.

I also see alot of people riding in curbs with loose reins. These people ride this no contact. Which is easier on the horse?? Which bit gives the rider a feeling of confidence?? People need to get over this snaffle is good curbs are bad attitude.
Again 50% of the people on here ride with curbs. Are they abussive??
     

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