Pulling when cantering
 
 

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Pulling when cantering

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  • Horse pulling when cantering
  • Horse pulling at the canter

 
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    11-29-2007, 05:53 PM
  #1
Foal
Pulling when cantering

Hi everyone.

My daughter recently received an otttb and he has a problem with pulling. He is great at a walk and trot except on his fiesty days but as soon as she gives him the cue to canter, he pulls his head down, puling her out of the saddle and getting faster and faster.

She's not very big or strong and he knows it so he just overpowers her, He was a perfect gentleman when we went to see him and now that he's been home he'sa brat!

With jumping... forget it. He gets way out of control and ends up galloping off after every jump.

What should we do???

Please help.
     
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    11-29-2007, 07:56 PM
  #2
Yearling
Lounge Longe Lounge! Lol Lounging allways helps.
Get him to respect you (or in this case your daughter) on the ground first by getting him to focus on her. Move his hip back him up and so on. And allways make sure that he respects her space. Have her streach her arm infront of her and he should be that far away. That just means he respects her space and he's out of 'the bubble'.
After the groundwork, and your ready for undersaddle work, make him give to bit pressure at the halt, walk, trot, then canter. Just pick up on the reins and hold it there till he tucks his head in (gives) the immeidiatly release. Do this alot till he gets that when she picks up on those reins he is to give to her. Then do it at the walk, trot, canter, and so on. That will make it easier to control him. Make sure he is lounged and he does these excersises every time she rides untill he gets easier to handle.
My filly had the same problem but she's improved alot since I've done that. When he pulls his head down like that it's becuase he is trying to avoid the bit contact and also makes it easier for him to buck.
Also if he gets a little faster than he should or bolts and she can't stop him, then turn him in a circle or pull his nose around the side.
Hope this helps! :)
     
    11-29-2007, 08:47 PM
  #3
Started
Eh...ottb's can be really hard for kids. I don't know how old your daughter is, but I'll tell the story anyway:P When I was about 12, my parents bought me an ottb. She was an amazing horse, but I didn't have the skill or the strength to retrain her. She would do to me exactly what you are describing. My parents actually ended up selling her to my trainer, who taught her to jump (she was an incredible jumper: did over 6') and sold her 2 years later for 25k when we bought her for 2k.

Now, I wish I could have that horse again, because now I have the knowledge and the extra size to work with her. Lunging is a good idea. Working in a small enclosed area is a good idea. The thing with ottbs at that stage is that you have to ride with a stong seat and good, independent balance; rein pressure just makes them go faster, you have to sit up tall and stong to make them slow down. You have to be able to control the pace with your seat and legs.

Concentrate on excercises in the walk and trot. Work canter on the lunge first until he listens very well to cues in that venue before you take it to the saddle. Instilling a good verbal "whoa" command is also important at all gaits.
     
    11-29-2007, 11:12 PM
  #4
Trained
Apart from what everyone else said, the harder you pull, the faster the horse will go. Its how they are trained :)
     
    11-30-2007, 08:00 PM
  #5
Foal
Thanks to everyone who posted! You all have been a really good help to me and my daughter.
     
    11-30-2007, 10:35 PM
  #6
Foal
Due to the fact that he was fine when you tried him, I'm going to guess that it's a case of him learning your daughter's weak points. I would recommend getting someone not necessarily bigger and stronger, but someone with more experience and "finesse" who can keep the horse in tune so he knows he can't get away with those problems. I'd also greatly suggest having this person give your daughter some lessons, so she can learn how to correct the problems as well. TBs on the track are trained to run with pressure on their mouths, so pulling directly back with both hands isn't going to help the situation in any way. It's a take and then a give, with any horse, but especially and OTTB.

Good luck!
     
    12-01-2007, 07:04 PM
  #7
Foal
Yeah that makes sense. I was actually making some calls to get some trainers out to help both the horse and my daughter. Thanks!
     

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