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Pulls when asked to canter on lunge

This is a discussion on Pulls when asked to canter on lunge within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to learn canta with your horse on lunge lead

 
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    02-23-2008, 10:56 PM
  #11
Yearling
Here is an idea as soon as she squares up with you ask for teh canter again and start jogging after her with a whip, and swing it at her, tap her rump if you have to just keep her going. Every time you let her stop and stare at you when you ask her to canter, SHE WINS. So do whatever it takes to keep her moving, be prepared for her to stop and anticipate it, then react IMMEDIATELY by getting after her, charge at her like you are the lead horse and mean business as soon as she starts to move away from you be it a walk trot or canter, stop moving soften up and return to middle. She will learn that stopping is UNACCEPTABLE and fast.
     
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    02-23-2008, 11:14 PM
  #12
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abby
here is an idea as soon as she squares up with you ask for teh canter again and start jogging after her with a whip, and swing it at her, tap her rump if you have to just keep her going. Every time you let her stop and stare at you when you ask her to canter, SHE WINS. So do whatever it takes to keep her moving, be prepared for her to stop and anticipate it, then react IMMEDIATELY by getting after her, charge at her like you are the lead horse and mean business as soon as she starts to move away from you be it a walk trot or canter, stop moving soften up and return to middle. She will learn that stopping is UNACCEPTABLE and fast.
I agree 100% with Abby. Charge at her...yell at her, do whatever it takes to keep her moving and possibly into a canter...if you stop, she wins and it will be even harder to break this.
     
    02-23-2008, 11:32 PM
  #13
Showing
Which is what I do sometimes, but she pulls back even harder and just flips out more... so frusterating. I've never had this much trouble.
     
    02-24-2008, 12:21 AM
  #14
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
Which is what I do sometimes, but she pulls back even harder and just flips out more... so frusterating. I've never had this much trouble.
you'll always get a horse that will give you trouble...there's no escaping a trouble maker
Another thing to do, is if you have two people, is to have someone just hold the line, while the other holds the whip. That way if you need to correct her, you can do it while still having someone hold the line so she doesn't keep pulling back and pulling back
     
    02-24-2008, 01:49 AM
  #15
Yearling
I know you probally already be doing this...but is your position right, are you behind her shoulder. When you ask her to canta, make sure you do step a fraction behind her and push her up.
The coming and facing you means confusion, because she is young the commands are difficult for her to comprehend. She sounds like she is trying hard to please, but when somthing gets too much she woses out and faces you.

I agree with running at her, as long as you keep her moving. Don't let her stop, don't care wether she picks up the wrong lead, or she is disunighted...

Praise is very important in young horses, more you praise the more they will try to impress you (which sounds like this mare)

Ok why am I telling you this lol... but yeh that's my part
But yeh tell me how it goes.. :)
     
    02-24-2008, 11:29 AM
  #16
Started
Well I have a different take on this From the sound of it, her behavior is out of unconfidence, not snotty behavior. I don't believe she is testing you. If a horse pulls back, it's usually out of fear. And running at her?? Sorry, that just makes no sense to me at all, of course she will pull back harder, a predator is running at her.

I was going to suggest free lunging her to ask her to canter but you've already done that, so it has to be something you are doing with the lunge line on. You want to act as if you don't have a line on at all.

How long is your lunge line? If it's not long enough it may be hard for her to canter and then she gets scared when more pressure is added.

How aggressive are you when asking for the canter? It may be too much which is what it sounds like to me. See how little it takes to get her to canter and you don't have to be aggressive about it. Ge aware of your energy and how much you are presenting to her. If she pulls and faces you DON'T GET AFTER HER. Obviously when you do that she gets more upset so that isn't working. Just go with her and when she stops drive the front end away and ask her to go out again. Act as if nothing happened. You want to be persistant with her.
     
    02-24-2008, 05:16 PM
  #17
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spirithorse
Well I have a different take on this From the sound of it, her behavior is out of unconfidence, not snotty behavior. I don't believe she is testing you. If a horse pulls back, it's usually out of fear. And running at her?? Sorry, that just makes no sense to me at all, of course she will pull back harder, a predator is running at her.

I was going to suggest free lunging her to ask her to canter but you've already done that, so it has to be something you are doing with the lunge line on. You want to act as if you don't have a line on at all.

How long is your lunge line? If it's not long enough it may be hard for her to canter and then she gets scared when more pressure is added.

How aggressive are you when asking for the canter? It may be too much which is what it sounds like to me. See how little it takes to get her to canter and you don't have to be aggressive about it. Ge aware of your energy and how much you are presenting to her. If she pulls and faces you DON'T GET AFTER HER. Obviously when you do that she gets more upset so that isn't working. Just go with her and when she stops drive the front end away and ask her to go out again. Act as if nothing happened. You want to be persistant with her.
yelling and chasing at her would be the result if she is testing you...but if she's actually afraid of you, no that would not be the good thing to do.

I have to disagree though on the don't get after her part. Yes, it could be that she's afraid of you, but even a horse that afraid of you will take advantage of you if you back down. That's the worse thing for you to do.
     
    02-24-2008, 07:05 PM
  #18
Weanling
I've had a couple of young horses do very similar things when I am just starting them on the lunge line. This is what I do, and it has worked for me so far. Some of this you probably already know, though. With the ones learning I use a big area that is free of obstacles - I have a large roping arena and have been know to use the entire thing, end to end at the beginning. Anyways, I always make sure with the youngsters that I am looking at their flank, a good driving place. When I think they may try to stop and square up to me, I take my leading arm (if circling to the left, the left arm holding the lunge line) and extend it out to my side as far as possible, "leading" them forward and encouraging them to keep going. Then I point/swing my lunge whip with the right hand out behind, not at, but behind the hind end.

Now for why I like such a large area to work in. If she is circling to the left, you ask to canter using the exaggerated signals, and she stops and square up to you and pulls, I am automatically going to my right, trying to stay in that driving position, always exaggerating my arms as I described above. I may end up doing circles around them if they try to keep square to me, but eventually they will move out and away for you. As soon as they are moving back onto the circle, reward them, even if it's not at a canter. The main point is that they can't stop and square up. Eventually, she will canter or more often run off onto the circle. If so, I just let them keep going until they either break down into a trot on their own or they are doing a nice, easy canter and I ask them to break down. If they happen to stop and square, repeat the process.

I hope that helps a bit and makes sense. Feel free to ask any questions if it is confusing. Keep us updated on how it goes!

Edited to add: It takes some coordination to keep running to their side to stay in the driving position and not let yourself or her trip over the lunge line. Trust me, I've done it before Also, as long as you don't think she will kick you, you don't have to be at the end of the lunge line when you are correcting her - just stay back and to the side, leading her with your arm.
     
    02-24-2008, 07:13 PM
  #19
Started
SonnyWimps, even if the horse is testing I still do not think yelling and chasing the horse is very productive. That is not something a horse will respect, at least the way I think if respect. Respect is earned, not given and certainly not demanded. I think yelling is very, very counter-productive.

If a horse is scared of you, why in the world would you get after it?? You need to retreat and re-approach, not just keep pushing and pushing and pushing. The object is to help the horse GAIN CONFIDENCE, NOT to get the horse to do the task at hand. If the horse is confident in you, he will offer you the world. But if he's scared and you get after it, why in the world would he trust you?
     
    02-25-2008, 09:44 PM
  #20
Deb
Foal
[Which is what I do sometimes, but she pulls back even harder and just flips out more... so frusterating. I've never had this much trouble.]

Let me tell you an interesting story about the little mare that "didn't want to..." I had her in the barn and saddling had gone well. Slipped the bit into her mouth, no big deal, pulled the bridle up around the ears, did up all the usual buckles up and took a step back and in the next moment she was throwing her head around and crashing against the walls like she was having some sort of seizure.

So I'm trying not to get crushed or stepped on and trying to calm her enough so that I can take the bridle off. Finally slip it off and instant calm, like nothing had happened. Ok, so we try it again and same thing. This time, before I pull if off, I got her calmed down enough to stand quietly while I inspect the bridle. Nothing is pinched or pulling, what the heck. I just can't figure this out.

So the next time, I took her outside so that there is nothing to smash her head against. Put the bridle on and this time it doesn't start until I get on her. Jumped off, she stops thrashing, I check, slip the bridle off , etc. And each time, there is nothing wrong with anything. So I put the bridle on one more time, she is trembling slightly, I get on and give her a squeeze and she moves off. Couple steps and it starts again, but this time I didn't give in. I just kept pushing her forward despite the shaking and thrashing her head around, and after about 50 feet, it simply stops, and she just gets back to work like nothing had ever happened. So tell me, at what point should I have backed off and given in to her. Horses can be fearful and that is how they stay alive. But they can also be a lot smarter than we give them credit for and they will try all kinds of tricks to get out of doing what we want.

My mare also turns in at me, even after all these years (I've had her for 11 or 12 years) and in effect, she is saying "make me". So I do. Maybe your horse is daring you too. And maybe you are standing too far forward and blocking her from moving forward when you are asking for the canter. I'm not quite sure what you mean by pulling on you. Is she just stopping and staring as she tries to back up, or do you mean as she's circling you, it's like her weight/movement is pulling outwards?
     

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