Pushiness will not be tolerated! any tips or advice? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 05:37 AM Thread Starter
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Pushiness will not be tolerated! any tips or advice?

So I'm buying my first horse! yay I've found the sweetest guy in the saddle and on the ground except for one thing which i need to start working on.
Hes always wanting pats, such a smoochy boy, but then he starts head butting/ kind of pushing you around and I dont tolerate stuff like that at all, especially since hes 16.1hh and only 6 years old.
But Im wondering how to go about this. I have a few ideas. When he tries to push me over, should i give him a bit of a whack? I did that today but then i wanted to give him more pats coz i was about to leave, but should I keep trying to pat him and discipline him everytime he tried to push me with his nose? I've heard someone say its cruel to hit a horse but I dont hit horses hard or cruely, I tend to give thema bit of a hit that shows that what they did was very naughty and that I do not appreciate it and will not be tolerated. I also want to get him to try and understand i love smoochies and giving pats and that I dont want him to stop being affectionate, I just want him to stop pushing/headbutting.
I'd rather work on this pushiness now since hes 6, I am just buying him and if I dont get a handle on this it could escalate into something very painful or dangerous.
But in no way is he viscious at all, he is a quiet horse so friendly and beautiful to ride he has only this one little habit.
So does anyone have any tips on ways to encourage him to stop it, what you would do/have done in the past :)
Thankyou

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post #2 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 07:41 AM
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Do you want a pet and a 'Buddy? If you do, get a dog. Horses make really lousy pets.

OR -- do you want a respectful pleasant and safe horse?

What really jumps out at me is your complete inconsistency. Your horse is never going to be a mind reader. If you scold him one time and let him rub on you the next, you are only confusing him.

I'll repeat my favorite saying that my students hear until they 'get it'.

The worst behavior you allow is the very best behavior you have any right to expect.

So, next time you want to hug and kiss him, hug and kiss your dog and then give him a good grooming instead and remember what I said.

Horses only operate well with a healthy respect for their handler / rider. Pets make really lousy riding horses and soon take over an entire relationship, calling all of the shots and running the show. They make really lousy bosses. Get a handle on his manners now and learn to be 100% consistent. Make him behave the same every minute of ever day.
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post #3 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 08:06 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie View Post
Do you want a pet and a 'Buddy? If you do, get a dog. Horses make really lousy pets.

OR -- do you want a respectful pleasant and safe horse?

What really jumps out at me is your complete inconsistency. Your horse is never going to be a mind reader. If you scold him one time and let him rub on you the next, you are only confusing him.

I'll repeat my favorite saying that my students hear until they 'get it'.

The worst behavior you allow is the very best behavior you have any right to expect.

So, next time you want to hug and kiss him, hug and kiss your dog and then give him a good grooming instead and remember what I said.

Horses only operate well with a healthy respect for their handler / rider. Pets make really lousy riding horses and soon take over an entire relationship, calling all of the shots and running the show. They make really lousy bosses. Get a handle on his manners now and learn to be 100% consistent. Make him behave the same every minute of ever day.

This is slightly rude as I am asking advice of ways that I SHOULD teach him out of this habit. Some people agree to shoving a horse away, others dont. I dont want a 'pet' and this is why I made this thread asking for advice on how i should teach him NO. He is my first horse and so I dont want to do anything wrong in teaching him so I was asking advice of more knowledgable people. I didnt want a lecture saying I'm treating him like a pet, because I'm not. So far I've always pushed him away, even gave a bit of a hit today. But I dont want to hit him unless its absolutely necessary and was wondering if theres any other way people do it, like some type of way to show its not tolerated without hitting him, like pushing his face away all the time if he gets to close? I feel quite dissapointed as you ignored the whole reason of this thread and made me out to be a kid whos got a pony they are treating like a puppy.
Yes I like giving horses pats and 'smoochies', when they deserve it and are being good and I'm sure tonnes of people show their animals affection. And I'm trying to find the best way of teaching him no.

when I said " but should I keep trying to pat him and discipline him everytime he tried to push me with his nose?" I was asking if I should do that tomorrow and keep on telling him no when he does push me. hmmmm perhaps I shouldn't bother asking :(

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Last edited by Tayz; 09-17-2011 at 08:09 AM.
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post #4 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 08:11 AM Thread Starter
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I'm sorry if I sounded rude Its just you ignored what I fully said and have made me out to sound like I'm not trying to fix this at all, which is what this thread is all about =[

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post #5 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 08:38 AM
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When you are leading your horse, first place your hand about 3' down the lead, not under his chin. As you walk, suddenly flap your right elbow, like the chicken dance. You've warned him altho the first time he might not take heed as he hasn't made the connection. Keep doing this but randomly, not like every 4 strides. One time he will run into your elbow. With the longer lead he'll be able to move farther away, out of your space. This won't make him headshy. Another exercise is to use your riding crop or a 4' stick and stand in front of him. Ask verbally to back, the wave your crop in front of his chest, then use the halter or bit to back him. Do it in this sequence as one reinforces the other allowing about 2 second intervals between each phase. Again, many repetitions. By backing, he has to back up far enough that both hind hooves move backward. Many horses will just move the fronts back but that doesn't count, you have to move the hind ones.BTW, when leading him do lots of turns away from you. This makes you the more dominant in his eyes as you are moving him away from you.
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post #6 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 08:45 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag View Post
When you are leading your horse, first place your hand about 3' down the lead, not under his chin. As you walk, suddenly flap your right elbow, like the chicken dance. You've warned him altho the first time he might not take heed as he hasn't made the connection. Keep doing this but randomly, not like every 4 strides. One time he will run into your elbow. With the longer lead he'll be able to move farther away, out of your space. This won't make him headshy. Another exercise is to use your riding crop or a 4' stick and stand in front of him. Ask verbally to back, the wave your crop in front of his chest, then use the halter or bit to back him. Do it in this sequence as one reinforces the other allowing about 2 second intervals between each phase. Again, many repetitions. By backing, he has to back up far enough that both hind hooves move backward. Many horses will just move the fronts back but that doesn't count, you have to move the hind ones.BTW, when leading him do lots of turns away from you. This makes you the more dominant in his eyes as you are moving him away from you.
Saddlebag- Thankyou so much, I will defiently be giving these a try. What exactly are the turns, as in like a full cricle or hindquarters over or just turning him away? Thanks :)

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post #7 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 09:00 AM
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You could try 'kicking'. If one of my horses gets a little rough I pretend kick, you don't have to make contact, just fling your leg up and stomp it on the ground. Sometimes this works sometimes it doesn't with certain horses. Be careful to watch him so he doesn't get the idea you don't want to play.

Or just swat his nose. Don't be to gentle or he wont get the message.

Horses are scared of two things... Things that move and things that don't.
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post #8 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 09:03 AM
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i kind of had the same issue with my boy when i got him. he's a lovely boy, very patient, quick learner and loves everyone (espeshally dogs lol). but he was very mouthy and pushy and had a low attencian span lol i mean he was only 6 at the time but these issues are learned habbits and that was our problem.
my instructor pointed it out to me and told me how to handle it. we tried to stand and talk for 5 minuits and he kept nibbling on my sleeve, and rubbing his head againt me, and trying to walk away etcetc. she didnt say anything untilk after we finished talking, and then called me on it. basicly what someone said up there. did i enjoy letting him walk all over me? did i want him as a pet. if yes then i should just leave him be. but if i wanted a respectful horse then she'd show me what to do. i miss admit i LOVE my horse to bits. but it was really irritating.
i was always taught by my instructor that if a horse deserves to be hit. hit them. how hard you hit depends on what the reason your hitting them is, what the point your trying to get across is. but you never beat up on them.ever. one hit, get in, get out. if you stand and watch horses in the feild alone thats how they react to eachother when one "crosses the line". so as long as your not taking it to far. no i dont think its cruel. but thats the way i was raised since the day i started around horses with my instructor. and all her horses are amazing animals, all well cared for, none nervice or head shy or anything that comes with animals who have been abused. (that wasnt aimed at you that was aimed at someone who might read this and think that hitting a horse once when its needed is cruel)
anyways, sorry i got off track there lol. with my horse we did alot of respect excersises on the ground. and i did alot of "join ups" with him alone. and i found those helped alot. but i wont get into those because it isnt really what you asked. when it came to my horse nudging me or nibbling on me i was told to give him a smack on the nose. not hard. just enough to say "no. your not supposed to do this" and then just go on doing what you were doing. if he tries to walk away like my boy did. imediatly put him back to where you had him standing originally. he'll get the hint eventually. my boy didnt take long at all, but he's a quick learner. sometimes i wonder if he's smarter them i am! haha. i'm not sure if you have any issues with bridling? i know i did. i would be trying to bridle my boy and he's constently be moveing his head around, trying to sniffthings, looking around etc etc. i was told just to hold his head inplace to bridle him. and keep doing it until he keeps his head still on his own. literally just take it on and off and on and off and on and off until he stands patiently. then reward him.
anyways, that what i did. i was consistent with it. and now he's good. he's still mouthy and lovey dovey at times, and still wants to know what everything is and go over and check it out. but he knows that when im holding him, or riding him or working with him in any way. its work time. afterwords when im giving him treats or if we go out from and i let him graze. he knows he can come say hi, and ask for treats and pets. but he never does in a disrespectful mannor. so what im saying is aslong as your consistent with it.and you dont cross the line when it comes to hitting. you wont have a problem i dont think. you'll gain his respect and when you gain his respect and his trust then you have a chance of getting all the other gooey feelings you want :)

sorry this is soo long. i kinda went off track a few times. i just woke up so im rambling haha. hope it all makes sence :)

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post #9 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 09:05 AM
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Tayz - as you take him for a walk, how much you turn him away is up to you. It's good if you mix it up. Right now your focus will be on turning his head away. Over the next few days back him up so many times that you will need to only ask him to back and he will. By interchanging the two exercises you are keeping his feet busy and telling them where to go.
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post #10 of 23 Old 09-17-2011, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag View Post
Tayz - as you take him for a walk, how much you turn him away is up to you. It's good if you mix it up. Right now your focus will be on turning his head away. Over the next few days back him up so many times that you will need to only ask him to back and he will. By interchanging the two exercises you are keeping his feet busy and telling them where to go.
i agree with this. alot of the exercized i did with my instructor involves controling where he moves his body. but when it comes to asking him to back up from the ground pay attencion to your body laungage. you want to position your belly button so that its pointing beside him. if that makes sence. i always thought you had to point it at there chest but i was wrong.

if you work on this alot you can do to other things without touching him. i can back my boy up and have him do a turn on the haunches without even touching him. its really fun and theres so much more you can do aswell that will help.

Beauty is not diminished by those who refuse to see, hear,feel or in any way sense it. If you refuse to see beauty its you who is weakened.
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