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Putting An End To Rearing

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    03-03-2013, 08:24 PM
  #11
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
in that case, just let her turn and go back to the barn, then as soon as she gets their get off, put her on a lunge line and run her till her tounge is hanging out.
Get back on and ride away from the barn, she fights you much go ahead turn around, go to barn and repeat. Eventually she will figure out it is much easier to walk away from the barn than it is to run laps around it.

Punishment has to be immediate. If you get the horse back to the barn, take time to put a lunge line on, etc.... the horse is then being punished for waiting patiently for the lunge line to be put on. They won't associate being run in circles at the barn as being punishment for being nasty on the trail.

Rearing is very dangerous. If the horse feels trapped and that it can't go forwards, it will go up. I would suggest that you get professional help. In the mean time, when the horse goes to rear, get FORWARD MOTION right away. Pull the horse's nose to your knee and beat it's sorry ass around in a circle. Then walk on calmly, and praise that.
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    03-03-2013, 08:26 PM
  #12
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
Rearing is very dangerous. If the horse feels trapped and that it can't go forwards, it will go up. I would suggest that you get professional help. In the mean time, when the horse goes to rear, get FORWARD MOTION right away. Pull the horse's nose to your knee and beat it's sorry ass around in a circle. Then walk on calmly, and praise that.
I am getting into an apprenticeship with a certified trainer.
     
    03-04-2013, 06:07 AM
  #13
Foal
Rearing is a sign of a malfunctioning go button. You cue go, you get rear. To fix rearing the go button has to be fixed first. If you can find a place to ride where you don't get the rearing, work on getting her go super light, so she can quickly and calmly go from halt to trot with a strong squeeze and from halt to walk from a light squeeze. The bigger the squeeze (cue) the bigger the reaction should be. Whip taps (not smacks) behind the girth can be used to fortify the go cue. When the horse is reliably giving a smart trot transition from halt then you have the go trained well enough to start over-ride the rearing response in situations where she tries to do it.

As other posters have noted, for punishment to work is has to start while the unwanted response is happening and stop as soon as the unwanted response stops. That way the horse is able to tell the exact behaviour that is resulting in the unpleasant consequence. Any punishing stimulus or action applied 5 seconds or longer after the behaviour being punished will not be associated with that behaviour and the horse will not have learned not to perform that behaviour.

As to the suggestions that you break something over the horse's head, this supposes that horses have an understanding of their physiology and know that when they get cut, they bleed and that's bad for their health. Highly unlikely. This idea may work because the horse gets a fright/pain from the object being broken on their head at the moment they are rearing (meeting the test of immediacy), however it has the potential to be extremely dangerous to the rider as well as causing the horse to then run/bolt, which only makes the situation worse.

The limitation with punishing any behaviour is that all it does is teach the horse what not to do. It does not teach it what it should do instead. Specifically training the appropriate response (go) very deeply is more productive because the horse is being taught what it should do. In my experience, rearing problems often disappear once the go button works like clockwork because the response becomes automatic and any time they stall (which usually always happens before they rear), the get cued for go and are so busy going they don't bother with trying a rear. Good luck with your mare.
     
    03-04-2013, 08:00 AM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by corymbia    
Rearing is a sign of a malfunctioning go button. You cue go, you get rear.
Except she's rearing when I ask for a halt
     
    03-04-2013, 08:32 AM
  #15
Green Broke
I totally disagree, many a barn sour horse has been fixed by simply letting them go back to the barn, then lunging or round penning heck out of them, get back on ride away. You don't let them stand around an patiently wait for the lunge line, soon as you dismount you make im hussle, HARD, for about 5 to 10 minutes. Get back on and ride out. They will make the connection.
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    03-04-2013, 08:35 AM
  #16
Yearling
^ I had a coach who used to do that.
     
    03-04-2013, 09:37 AM
  #17
Yearling
I disagree Corymbia, there are plenty of other reasons for a horse to rear than not wanting to move forward, I've hardly had a horse rear when asked to move forward. Its usually when they are barn sour, asked to stop, or spooked. In all my years of fixing a horse with an egg, I have never had one bolt and never made the situation worse. And if a herd sour horse is taught to go when he rears, you will soon have a horse that runs away from you back home and when you try and stop him, rears. Do not fix this by asking the horse to go..
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    03-04-2013, 09:40 AM
  #18
Yearling
I just had a thought. My mare is already slightly head shy, would breaking something over her head make that worse?
     
    03-04-2013, 09:43 AM
  #19
Yearling
No, because she will think she hurt herself by rearing, not that a human did it to her.
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    03-04-2013, 10:10 AM
  #20
Weanling
The egg or balloon only works occasionally, not very reliable, and can make things worse. If it doesn't work the first time, DON'T try it again. And if at all possible try it in a round pen, so if she should bolt and run, you can regain control. I've use the trick a few times. I always used a warm water balloon. It only worked on a couple of horses.

Buddy sour-Barn sour, is cured thru training and absence. Training until the horse does nothing until asked by the handler. Absence, kept them away from the buddy 100% of the time until the training is complete. And stay at the barn until the training is complete.

I'd suggest, go back to ground school 101. Teach the horse a true freeze whoa. Teach the horse side pass, half pass, back, and any thing else you can think of from the ground. And have her respond instantly, every time, before ever riding her. During training session, she should do nothing that the handler does not ask for, nothing.

It is impossible for a well trained horse to be buddy sour or barn sour, or rear. That means until the horse knows it well, the handler must always be in control. No relaxing and letting the horse do it's thing.

And let's not forget, the horse was not this way in the beginning, it was taught this by humans. Probably not intentional, but taught, none the less. The job now is to undo the wrong training.
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