Putting An End To Rearing - Page 4
 
 

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Putting An End To Rearing

This is a discussion on Putting An End To Rearing within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Habitual rearing

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    03-04-2013, 06:18 PM
  #31
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by palogal    
Have this horses teeth been checked? Is the bit whacking a wolf tooth? Try jacking yourself in the molar with a tuning fork. No bueno.
Yes they have. The rearing started before they needed to be done.
     
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    03-04-2013, 06:20 PM
  #32
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by BornToRun    
Let me just say it one more time, before anyone feels the need to suggest it again. I am getting into an apprenticeship with a certified trainer. I'm quite aware that there is no shame in admitting there is something I can't do on my own, I wouldn't be here, or seeking help from another person if that was not the case.
Sorry I had not seen that buried beneath all these walls of texts.
     
    03-04-2013, 06:21 PM
  #33
Yearling
Punish the thought with work. Circles are great. As soon as you feel her shift off of her front end, work her. Once she's up, its too late.
     
    03-04-2013, 07:42 PM
  #34
Started
Circles are fine, but I rode on a trail with a horse that was circled for bad behavior. It just led to the horse behaving poorly and then circling himself. Which was a hazard on some of the trails we rode on. The circles did not stop the behavior they were just a toll the horse payed to misbehave. The best step is prevention. Which means figuring out the cues/triggers. I think its good you have a trainer coming out. Out of curiosity how long has this behavior been going on?
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    03-04-2013, 08:54 PM
  #35
Showing
You are moving the wrong end. In order to rear and horse has to position it's back legs, rock back, bunch it's abdominal muscles and lift. All of this can happen in a span of a few seconds. The moment you feel a change in her body, bring her head around so you can see her eye and make her move her hindquarters. When she's moving her hips laterally, even if forward movement is involved, one leg is stepping under her belly. This is like a table with three legs. You may be circling but your goal is to have the hind end make the larger circle. Because moving in a straight line is easiet on the horse, bending and moving the hindquarters laterally is tiring. Practise this first on the ground. Hold her halter with your hand about two feet away from the clip. Bend her head a little and use a lunge whip to tap her hip over. Your body will be toward her shoulder and about 3' out from it. She will move forward so allow that to happen but as she does keep moving her hip so it makes the largest circle around you.Watch her inside hind and see how it steps underneath. Pretty hard to rear with that going on.
     
    03-04-2013, 10:17 PM
  #36
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by rookie    
Out of curiosity how long has this behavior been going on?
The first time I've ever seen her rear was two summers ago when a less than adequate trainer tried to make her do more than she knew. The next time was this past fall, I think it was after Thanksgiving, I wouldn't let her run to catch up to my parents who had ridden ahead of us. She threw me off and that was the end of it until these past couple weeks, when she's started to do it more often.
     
    03-04-2013, 11:55 PM
  #37
Started
Horse Manners : Rearing Under Saddle - Causes and Solutions : Kinsey Horsemanship

Hope this helps!
     
    03-05-2013, 09:12 AM
  #38
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoebox    
What would you suggest, if one couldn't get professional help?

I'm serious, not trying to be an ass. I don't have a horse that rears, and I've never had to deal with rearing. My horse seems to lazy to rear (LOL). But I absolutely don't have the money for a trainer, or for lessons. So if she started up, I would be the one to deal with it. We've been able to fix any issues she's had thus far, so I think I could do it.... If I knew the right way.

Honestly, I know NOTHING about how to fix rearing. To me some of these suggestions sounded logical... Until you pointed out fallacy, and now I'm back to square 1. So for someone with a rearer, who does not have access to a trainer what would you propose to do? And please don't say 'if you don't have a trainer sell the horse' type things. As well as it would be to have a trainer we can't ALL have one... And I would do anything before I would sell Clementine, even if she reared up on me. I would definitely give it a go, but it'd be nice to learn the proper way to deal with it.

Again - my horse doesn't rear. She never has. I'm just curious.
I am sorry, this is the answer you do not want to hear. If you cannot get professional help, SELL THE HORSE.

YOUR life is more important than ANY horse. There will be another horse. There will not be another YOU.

Yes. That is why I do not get on "rearing horse" threads with advice. Rearing is a deadly habit and you can die, be paralyzed etc. I am not talking about the rare situation where a horse rears out of sudden fear etc... I am talking about habitual issues. Lean forward or bail.. give the horse free rein.. if your horse rears. That is a riding skill. FIXING rearing is a training skill. Those two things are different.

The internet is not the place to get advice for habitual rearing.
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    03-05-2013, 10:55 AM
  #39
Green Broke
Egg works, so does flat handed smack between ears.

Done best when first goes up however.

And anyone that has ever tried to load a horse in a trailer knows? Let that horse bump itself one time on trailer roof? Battle from then on out. They do associate being bumped between ears with "keep that head down."

This is a spoiled horse, that has learned it can do this and get out of riding.

And unless you change way you handle/ride? All the training in the world will not fix this, you are the problem here, in that horse is in charge.
     
    03-05-2013, 11:26 AM
  #40
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
I am sorry, this is the answer you do not want to hear. If you cannot get professional help, SELL THE HORSE.

YOUR life is more important than ANY horse. There will be another horse. There will not be another YOU.

Yes. That is why I do not get on "rearing horse" threads with advice. Rearing is a deadly habit and you can die, be paralyzed etc. I am not talking about the rare situation where a horse rears out of sudden fear etc... I am talking about habitual issues. Lean forward or bail.. give the horse free rein.. if your horse rears. That is a riding skill. FIXING rearing is a training skill. Those two things are different.

The internet is not the place to get advice for habitual rearing.
As much as this will sound like one of those immature responses but she's not getting sold unless some majorly hefty circumstances were happening. I don't see any reason that someone who does know how to deal with it (like a trainer, or something) couldn't tell me the best way to go about it instead of immediately "sell your horse." That doesn't ALWAYS have to be the answer. I mean, how does a trainer learn to deal with rearing? By having someone tell them how.

I guess it really depends on the situation to make an individual decision. In some - maybe even many - situations, yes, a trainer would be best, even selling your animal. Heck, a trainer will ALWAYS be best. "Trainer or sell the horse" should not be the answer for every single person who has a horse that might rear, though. An experienced rider might have the ability to fix it themselves, and just need some pointers on the correct way to do so.

I'm having a hard time getting across what I'm trying to say here. That's like saying if your dog snaps at you, either hire a dog trainer or sell it. Yes, dog aggression is hard to fix, and it could even be a danger to yourself. But many people fix it on their own. But if they ask the best way to fix it and everybody says "I won't tell you, sell your dog," well, they're going to get hurt trying to fix it the wrong way.

Maybe that's just me. I'm glad she's a good horse who keeps her feet planted. If you hate the threads offering advice on how to fix it, you shouldn't post about how everyone else is wrong and why, and then not offer something yourself. Even a trainer starts somewhere - if everyone told them to sell the horse or bring it to a pro they wouldn't ever be able to become trainers, then, would they?

I do see what you're saying. Rearing IS dangerous, and I would highly advise anyone who has a rearer to get professional help. But sometimes they can't, and I see no reason to refuse to help because of that so long as the rider is experienced and knows what he/she's getting into. (And I'm really not trying to come off as an ass here, I promise).

And onto the topic - OP, have you tried anything? How is it going?
BornToRun and SnowCowgirl like this.
     

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